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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.foodanddrinktechnology.com

The food and drink industry often has to reiterate that a ‘joined up approach’ is more beneficial than the demonisation of sugar, for example, or the food industry as a whole, when tackling the childhood obesity issue. As director general of the UK’s Food and Drink Federation Ian Wright has previously said, “Obesity will only be beaten by a national partnership involving government, the NHS and health professionals, schools, retailers, restaurants and food and drink manufacturers.” In light of this, last week’s launch by the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) of a professional development nutrition platform for primary school teachers is a welcome contribution to the desired collaborative approach. The launch comes in response to the results of research which shows that teachers are getting little training in the area of nutrition; yet poor nutrition and an unhealthy lifestyle are considered detrimental to academic performance as well as health. Roy Ballam, managing director and head of education at the BNF, says, “It is critical that teachers lay the foundations for children to make good dietary and lifestyle choices now and as adults. But most primary teachers have received virtually no formal training in food, nutrition and physical activity. It is because of this that the BNF believes that there is an urgent need to support these teachers during their training and when they are practicing.”


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.4-01 | Award Amount: 1.12M | Year: 2011

The objective is to further integrate/refine the EuroFIR Food Platform (EFP), to improve/support the ways research is undertaken into relationships between food, diets and health in Europe. Our focus is on extending application and exploitation of validated food data and tools for pan-European nutrition studies and networked usage, implementation of standards and best practice. This together forms the basis of long-term sustainability through the newly established legal entity EuroFIR AISBL). Six Work Packages are included: Quality standards & certification; Systems integration & operational support; Integration & business development; Training; Dissemination & Management. The revised consortium has 35 existing EuroFIR partners (18 as 3rd parties/EuroFIR AISBL members). The already achieved high-level institutional commitment will be further strengthened. The new General Assembly consists of executive representatives of all beneficiaries (who are also AISBL Members), thus real and durable integration is achievable. The Executive Board will work closely with EuroFIR AISBL to provide an integrated approach to joint activities and stakeholder engagements. A high-level External Advisory Board of key users/stakeholders from Europe and internationally will ensure that food data, other products and services are fine-tuned to stakeholders needs, keeping Europe at the forefront of leadership and innovation in this area. Outputs are consistent with the ETP `Food for Life and will further support Theme 2 (FP7) in food and nutrition research contributing to the structuring of the European Research Area and world-class scientific/technological excellence. Additionally, the outputs bring the EFP in alignment with the current European CEN Standard on Food Data and its application.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2012

The main objective of the BACCHUS project is to develop tools and resources that will facilitate the generation of robust and exploitable scientific evidence that can be used to support claims of a cause and effect relationship between consumption of bioactive peptides and polyphenols, and beneficial physiological effects related to cardiovascular health in humans. To achieve this, the BACCHUS consortium has assembled 12 leading Research & Technological centres and 16 SMEs (with ca 30% of the EC requested contribution allocated to the SMEs). BACCHUS thus contains SMEs directly involved in developing food products and pursuing health claims, experts in health claims legislation and the EFSA review process, and academic and industry partners who provide high quality food and health research that can underpin health claims. Existing SME-developed products that have clear potential for obtaining favourable opinions for health claims have been selected as test cases for study. These have been aligned with a series of work-packages each of which addresses key aspects of the EFSA health claim evaluation process (legislation and dossiers; product/bioactive characterisation; habitual intakes; bioavailability; mechanisms and biomarkers; clinical trials evidence of health benefit) that will deliver tools, processes and high quality original science. Scientific results and best practice guidelines will be made publically available and thus support future claims for industry. The scope and completeness of the existing bioactive database (eBASIS) that includes both compositional and biological effects data will be extended and developed as a sustainable tool with various training materials. All outcomes will be disseminated broadly by direct engagement with SMEs via an existing European SME association, with stakeholders via seminars, newsletters and press releases, as well as through traditional scientific routes (high quality publications, and conference presentations).


O'Connor A.,British Nutrition Foundation
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2012

Despite being a staple food in the UK for centuries, bread consumption has fallen steadily over the last few decades. Average consumption now equates to only around 2-3 slices of bread a day. As well as providing energy, mainly in the form of starch, bread contains dietary fibre and a range of vitamins and minerals. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) of adults suggests that it still contributes more than 10% of our daily intake of protein, thiamine, niacin, folate, iron, zinc, copper and magnesium; one-fifth of our fibre and calcium intakes; and more than one-quarter of our manganese intake. Therefore, eating bread can help consumers to meet their daily requirements for many nutrients, including micronutrients for which there is evidence of low intake in some groups in the UK, such as zinc and calcium. This paper gives an overview of the role of bread in the UK diet, its contribution to nutrient intakes and current consumption patterns in different population groups. © 2012 British Nutrition Foundation.


Buttriss J.L.,British Nutrition Foundation
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society | Year: 2013

The role of the food industry (retailers, manufacturers and food service) in helping consumers eat healthily and sustainably has been receiving considerable attention in recent years. This paper focuses on the challenges facing the food industry and the role of food reformulation in meeting these challenges, through the lens of a public health nutritionist. Attention has been heightened by the Government's Responsibility Deal, launched in early 2011 by the Department of Health (England), by the UK's engagement with the global food security and food supply sustainability agendas and by the Government Office of Science's Foresight report. The Responsibility Deal's food network has to date focused on reduction of trans fatty acids, salt and calories and out-of-home calorie labelling (in food service settings). New pledges are expected soon on increasing fruit and vegetable intakes. Reformulation is a major feature of the Responsibility Deal's approach, and along with other approaches such as portion control, choice editing and information provision, there is potential to increase the breadth of healthier choices available to the public. With the exception of fruit and vegetables, the emphasis has been almost exclusively on aspects of the diet that are in excess for many of the population (e.g. energy and salt). Evidence of low consumption of some key micronutrients by some groups of the population, particularly adolescents and young adults, often alongside excess energy intake compared with expenditure, is all too often overlooked. This paper summarises the progress made to date, the challenges faced and the opportunities that exist, with particular focus on reformulation. One of the biggest challenges is the relatively poor understanding of how to effect positive and long-term dietary behaviour change. The paper concludes that, in isolation, reformulation is unlikely to provide a complete solution to the challenge of improving eating patterns and nutrient provision, although it is a contributor. Copyright © 2012 The Author.


Buttriss J.L.,British Nutrition Foundation
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2011

The report from the UK government's Foresight team, The Future of Food and Farming: Challenges and Choices for Global sustainability, published in January 2011, explores the pressures on the global food system between now and 2050, and identifies the decisions that policy makers need to take today and in the years ahead in order to ensure that the future global population can be fed sustainably, and underlines the need for the public health and food supply sustainability agendas to be harnessed together. The global population is now 6.8 billion and is estimated to reach over 9 billion by 2050. Not only is the world's population expanding but it is also undergoing rapid development, and with this comes increasing demand for protein rich foods, especially meat and dairy products. As economies strengthen, the so-called diseases of affluence are often found alongside chronic malnutrition, in India for example, making the public health challenges particularly complex. The Foresight report concludes that, without change, food production will continue to degrade the environment and compromise the world's capacity to produce sufficient food in a sustainable way, as well as contributing to climate change and destruction of biodiversity. The report also emphasises that the use of new technologies as a partial solution, such as genetic modification and livestock cloning, should not be excluded a priori on ethical and moral grounds. But the question remains 'what should be done in terms of dietary advice?' This paper considers some of the issues. © 2011 The Author. Journal compilation © 2011 British Nutrition Foundation.


Buttriss J.L.,British Nutrition Foundation
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2015

The European Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation ensures that any claims on European Union food labels are substantiated by robust scientific evidence; is this promoting innovation in the food industry and enabling consumers to make meaningful food choices? This paper provides an overview of the Regulation and some of the issues that have arisen since its implementation in 2007, with examples. It also discusses several European Commission-funded projects that are underway, in particular BACCHUS (FP7/2007-2013; 312090: www.bacchus-fp7.eu) that is providing support to small- and medium-sized enterprises that are considering whether to use or apply for health claims. © 2015 British Nutrition Foundation.


Buttriss J.L.,British Nutrition Foundation
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2015

One in five people in the UK is known to have a low serum vitamin D level (25-hydroxy vitamin D below 25 nmol/l) according to the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. The Summer of 2015 saw publication of a draft report from the government's Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), which proposes introduction of dietary reference values (DRVs) for all age groups (not just those considered as vulnerable). The health outcome identified as the basis for setting DRVs for vitamin D was musculoskeletal health (based on rickets, osteomalacia, falls, risk of falling and muscle strength). The data were not sufficient to establish a distribution of serum 25(OH)D concentrations or a clear threshold serum 25(OH)D concentration to support musculoskeletal health outcomes, but the evidence overall suggests that the risk of poor musculoskeletal health is increased at serum 25(OH)D concentrations below 25 nmol/l. Therefore, SACN selected a serum 25(OH)D concentration of 25 nmol/l, on a precautionary basis, as the target concentration to protect all individuals from poor musculoskeletal health. This concentration was considered to be a 'population protective level' (i.e. the concentration that 97.5% of individuals in the UK should be above, throughout the year, in order to protect musculoskeletal health). After establishing the health outcomes linked with low vitamin D status, the next step in estimating DRVs for vitamin D was translation of the serum 25(OH)D concentration of 25 nmol/l into a dietary intake value that represents the reference nutrient intake (RNI) for vitamin D [i.e. the average daily vitamin D intake that would be sufficient to maintain a serum 25(OH)D concentration of at least 25 nmol/l in 97.5% of individuals in the UK]. The average vitamin D intake refers to the mean or average intake over the long-term and takes account of day-to-day variations in vitamin D intake. It was not possible to quantify the sunlight exposure required in the summer months to maintain a winter serum 25(OH)D concentration of at least 25 nmol/l because of the number of factors that affect endogenous vitamin D synthesis, storage and utilisation. Instead, use was made of a series of three randomised controlled trials, conducted in the winter months, to estimate directly the amount of vitamin D required daily to achieve a serum threshold of 25 nmol/l throughout the year. The RNI proposed by SACN for all people aged 4 and above is 10 μg/day. For younger children, a Safe Intake of 8.5-10 μg/day (depending on age) is proposed. These recommendations bring alignment with many other countries of the world. As dietary intakes from food are typically well below the 10 μg/day proposed by SACN for most age groups, media reports speculated on how this advice might be achieved in practice. Nutrition Bulletin © 2015 British Nutrition Foundation.


Buttriss J.L.,British Nutrition Foundation
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2016

This article provides a brief history about UK food-based dietary guidelines as a prelude to discussion about new the Eatwell Guide and changes to 5 A DAY messaging launched in March 2016. Included is a summary of the main changes made and the methodology used to steer the development of the new Eatwell Guide (linear programming). Brief reference is also made to the principal differences between the new UK guide and food-based guidelines used in other parts of the world. © 2016 British Nutrition Foundation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2011.4-03 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2012

The effective communication of research results of EC funded research projects to end users is hampered by a number of factors including Lack of confidence and communication skills within the scientific community Inherent difficulties in effectively reaching out to the media and other multipliers with research results Poor dissemination of research results significantly reduces the potential project impact on European competitiveness and the quality of life of EU citizens. CommFABnet addresses these challenges in the FP6 Food Quality and Safety and FP7 KBBE programmes with an innovative range of activities to establish a large network of communication managers identify and exchange best practice in the communication of research results to target groups provide training to scientists in communicating research results address target audiences including the general public, SMEs, policy makers and young people CommFABnet comprises a consortium of organisations expert in the effective communication and dissemination of research results who demonstrate essential complementarity in successfully reaching different target groups. CommFABnet is led by Karolinska Institutet who has initiated and maintained the informal CommNet network of communication managers in the food safety research since 2006. This highly relevant experience will be fully exploited in the design and implementation of CommFABnets activities. CommFABnet will increase and channel the information flow from research projects towards the target groups. The exchange of best practice and training events for the CommFABnet network of communication officers and managers will result in a European community of communication managers highly proficient in the effective communication of research results to a range of target groups and other stakeholders. The result will be a significantly enhanced impact of the research results on European competitiveness and on the quality of life of EU citizens

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