Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Warrington, United Kingdom

British Nuclear Fuels Limited was a nuclear energy and fuels company owned by the UK Government. It was a former manufacturer and transporter of nuclear fuel , ran reactors, generated and sold electricity, reprocessed and managed spent fuel , and decommissioned nuclear plants and other similar facilities.Until 2003 its headquarters were based at Risley, near Warrington, England. BNFL's headquarters were then moved to Daresbury Park industrial estate, also near Warrington. On 1 April 2005, BNFL formed a new holding company, and started a rigorous restructuring process which would transfer or sell most of its entire domain, divisions. In 2005, it transferred all of its nuclear sites to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. It then sold its Westinghouse Electric Company subsidiary in February 2006. Later, BNFL sold the separate companies that made up its major subsidiary, British Nuclear Group. By May 2009, BNFL had completed the sales of all its assets and had no remaining operational activities or businesses.BNFL continued to exist only as a legal entity to meet all pension liabilities and any obligations arising from disposal programmes. However, on 14 October 2010, Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude announced that BNFL would be abolished along with a number of other government organisations. Wikipedia.


Carter S.,Hull Research and Technology Center | Fisher A.S.,University of Plymouth | Goodall P.S.,British Nuclear Fuels Limited | Hinds M.W.,Royal Canadian Mint | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry | Year: 2011

There is considerable interest in the non-destructive analysis of archaeological or historical materials (glasses, ceramics, paintings, materials etc.). The use of solid sampling techniques that cause minimal damage is therefore still gaining in popularity. This is especially true for laser-based techniques such as LIBS and laser ablation, although the many variants of the X-ray-based techniques are also still proving very popular. Non-destructive analysis is also the ideal scenario for forensic scientists and therefore many of these applications are using similar techniques. The increasing trend to use multiple analytical techniques, ideally simultaneously, to cause minimal damage and to obtain the maximal number of results in the shortest time, is also noted. The technique of LIBS, which offers minimal sample damage and a "stand-off" capability is still gaining in popularity, although there are still question marks regarding its quantitative capabilities for some sample types. There is also considerable interest in the growing area of thin films and depth-profiling. Substantial research is on-going to develop methods to improve depth-resolution and several different approaches have been described in the literature. These approaches often use SIMS with either a lower energy primary beam or a primary beam consisting of polyatomic molecules. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Source


Carter S.,Hull Research and Technology Center | Fisher A.S.,University of Plymouth | Goodall P.S.,British Nuclear Fuels Limited | Hinds M.W.,Royal Canadian Mint | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry | Year: 2010

It is a noticeable trend over the last couple of review periods that the number and quality of nuclear applications has been increasing. That trend has continued into this year. Semiconductors and other electronic components continue to become smaller and utilise more pure materials; hence analysing them becomes more difficult. This is especially true when depth-resolved data is required. Techniques capable of analysing with ever increasing depth resolution are therefore necessary and many studies into this have been reported. There is still a large interest in the non-destructive analysis of archaeological or historical materials (glasses, ceramics, paintings etc.). The use of solid sampling techniques that cause minimal damage is therefore still gaining in popularity. This is especially true for laser-based techniques such as LIBS and laser ablation, although the many variants of the X-ray-based techniques are also still proving very popular. The increasing trend to use multiple analytical techniques, ideally simultaneously to cause minimal damage and to obtain the maximal number of results in the shortest time, is also noted. These attempts to obtain maximum information are, again, mainly true for historical artefacts where obtaining more analytical information will lead to a better understanding of provenance, manufacturing process, etc.The real time analysis being undertaken in engines and at coal fired boilers is also an interesting development. These real time analyses allow monitoring of the systems and enable any deviations from peak performance to be identified and corrected in the shortest time possible. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Source


Islam M.M.,University of Warwick | Holland D.,University of Warwick | Howes A.P.,University of Warwick | Scales C.R.,British Nuclear Fuels Limited
Physics and Chemistry of Glasses: European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part B | Year: 2010

The effects of the addition of divalent metal oxides on the structure and thermophysical properties of the mixed alkali borosilicate glass system used for high level radioactive waste immobilisation have been studied. Densities, molar volumes, linear thermal expansivities and glass transition temperatures are reported and structural information has been obtained using 11B and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Molar volume is controlled by ion size and by the formation of network polyhedra, whilst thermal expansion reflects the network rigidity. Changes in the glass transition temperature, Tg, are consistent with the different values of the heat of formation of the oxides added. Alkaline earth oxides produce an initial increase in the fraction of 4-coordinated boron, N 4, whereas PbO and ZnO reduce N 4. 29Si NMR of the alkaline earth oxide glasses shows the presence of significant concentrations of nonbridging oxygens, consistent with a previous study of the aqueous corrosion behaviour of these glasses. PbO and ZnO reduce and ultimately eliminate the nonbridging oxygens. Estimates of the quantities of Q 4(Pb) have been made and are shown to change with composition in the same manner as Q 4(Me) in glasses with trivalent additions. Source


Patent
British Nuclear Fuels Limited | Date: 2010-08-20

The invention provides a method for the separation of solids from a semi-solid viscous mass, the method comprising treating a solids-containing semi-solid viscous mass in an apparatus comprising a separating member incorporating a substantially flat solid surface and a supporting member, wherein the separating member is adapted to selectively impart directional momentum to the solids, thereby facilitating separation of the solids from the semi-solid viscous mass. Preferably the separating member comprises a substantially flat solid surface adapted for vibrational motion, the vibrational motion causing the solids material to be displaced from the remainder of the semi-solid viscous mass.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 582.00K | Year: 2006

This project will install two state-of-the-art high power lasers: a 400 W nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser and a 1 kW fibre lasers, both developed by UK companies. Suitable external optics and high speed CNC systems will be integrated with the lasers to form materials processing cells.The lasers will be used to carry out a number of joint projects between the applicants research group and four existing EPSRC IMRCs: Cambridge Manufacturing Institute, Scottish Manufacturing Institute, Cranfield Innovative Manufacturing Research Centre and the University of Nottingham. These projects include super-speed laser cutting, high precision laser drilling, direct laser milling, surface texturing and micro-welding. Also six companies (including Rolls-Royce, BNFL and Pilkington) are involved in the project.This project will bring five leading research groups in the UK together to tackle the chanllanges of next generation manufacturing.

Discover hidden collaborations