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Wagner S.,University Paris - Sud | Apetrii M.,Service de Nephrologie | Apetrii M.,Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy | Massy Z.A.,University Paris - Sud | And 15 more authors.
Free Radical Research | Year: 2017

Statin treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular mortality in the general population, but it has little or no benefit in hemodialyzed (HD) patients. This may reflect different underlying pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with HD, maybe involving the oxidative stress. Our aim was to assess the association of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), determined by Mercodia oxLDL enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, with major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality in HD patients based on the AURORA trial (rosuvastatin vs placebo), and patients not on HD from the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study. We also assessed whether its decrease due to statin use improves these outcomes using Cox proportional hazard models. Baseline oxLDL level was 34.2 ± 13.8 U/L in AURORA and did not differ between treatment groups, and 74.6 ± 28.1 U/L in LURIC. Lower baseline oxLDL levels were associated with higher hazard ratios (HRs) for outcomes, but not anymore after adjusting for apolipoprotein B level in AURORA and was not related to mortality in LURIC. OxLDL levels decreased by 30.9% between baseline and 3 months in the statin-treated group and increased by 10.5% between 3 and 12 months. Nevertheless, oxLDL reduction was not significantly associated with adjusted HRs for MACE and for all-cause mortality. These results showed no association between oxLDL and MACE after adjustment on apolipoprotein B, which may relate to the properties of the method used for oxLDL. Our results also showed no benefit for oxLDL reduction by rosuvastatin on outcomes. Future clinical trials are needed to define the relative CVD risks and benefits of other modalities of oxidative stress modification in this population. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.


Dahle D.O.,University of Oslo | Mjoen G.,University of Oslo | Oqvist B.,Lund University | Scharnagl H.,Medical University of Graz | And 10 more authors.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation | Year: 2011

Background. Although short-term graft survival has improved substantially in renal transplant recipients, long-term graft survival has not improved over the last decades. The lack of knowledge of specific causes and risk factors has hampered improvements in long-term allograft survival. There is an uncertainty if inflammation is associated with late graft loss.Methods. We examined, in a large prospective trial, the inflammation markers high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and their association with chronic graft dysfunction. We collected data from the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplant trial, which recruited 2102 maintenance renal transplant recipients.Results. Baseline values were hsCRP 3.8 ± 6.7 mg/L and IL-6 2.9 ± 1.9 pg/mL. Adjusted for traditional risk factors, hsCRP and IL-6 were independently associated with death-censored graft loss, the composite end points graft loss or death and doubling of serum creatinine, graft loss or death.Conclusion. The inflammation markers hsCRP and IL-6 are associated with long-term graft outcomes in renal transplant recipients. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.


Holme I.,University of Oslo | Fellstrom B.C.,Uppsala University Hospital | Jardin A.G.,British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Center | Schmieder R.E.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Internal Medicine | Year: 2012

Objectives. Risk factors of mortality in patients with haemodialysis (HD) have been identified in several studies, but few prognostic models have been developed with assessments of calibration and discrimination abilities. We used the database of the Assessment of Survival and Cardiovascular Events study to develop a prognostic model of mortality over 3-4years. Methods. Five factors (age, albumin, C-reactive protein, history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes) were selected from experience and forced into the regression equation. In a 67% random try-out sample of patients, no further factors amongst 24 candidates added significance (P<0.01) to mortality outcome as assessed by Cox regression modelling, and individual probabilities of death were estimated in the try-out and test samples. Calibration was explored by calculating the prognostic index with regression coefficients from the try-out sample to patients in the 33% test sample. Discrimination was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) areas. Results. The strongest prognostic factor in the try-out sample was age, with small differences between the other four factors. Calibration in the test sample was good when the calculated number of deaths was multiplied by a constant of 1.33. The five-factor model discriminated reasonably well between deceased and surviving patients in both the try-out and test samples with an ROC area of about 0.73. Conclusions. A model consisting of five factors can be used to estimate and stratify the probability of death for individuals The model is most useful for long-term prognosis in an HD population with survival prospects of more than 1year. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.


Carson P.E.,Georgetown University | Anand I.S.,University of Minnesota | Win S.,University of Minnesota | Rector T.,University of Minnesota | And 10 more authors.
JACC: Heart Failure | Year: 2015

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction and the causes of hospitalization and post-hospitalization mortality. Background: Although hospitalizations in patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction are common, there are limited data from clinical trials on the causes of admission and the influence of hospitalizations on subsequent mortalityrisk. Methods: Patients (n= 4,128) with New York Heart Association functional class II to IV HF and left ventricular ejection fractions >45% were enrolled in I-PRESERVE (Irbesartan in Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction). A blinded events committee adjudicated cardiovascular hospitalizations and all deaths using predefined and standardized definitions. The risk for death after HF, any-cause, or non-HF hospitalization was assessed using time-dependent Cox proportional hazard models. Results: A total of 2,278 patients had 5,863 hospitalizations during the 49 months of follow-up, of which 3,585 (61%) were recurrent hospitalizations. For any-cause hospitalizations, 26.5% of patients died during follow-up, with an incident mortality rate of 11.1 deaths per 100 patient-years (PYs) and an adjusted hazard ratio of 5.32 (95% confidence interval: 4.21 to 6.23). Overall, 53.6% of hospitalizations were classified as cardiovascular and 43.7% as noncardiovascular, with 2.7% not classifiable. HF was the largest single cause of initial (17.6%) and overall (21.1%) hospitalizations, although, after HF hospitalization, a substantially higher proportion of readmissions were due to primary HF causes (40%). HF hospitalization occurred in 685 patients, with 41% deaths during follow-up, an incident mortality rate of 19.3 deaths per 100 PYs. The adjusted hazard ratio was 2.93 (95% confidence interval: 2.40 to 3.57) relative to patients who were not hospitalized for HF and was greater in those with longer durations of hospitalization. There were 1,593 patients with only non-HF hospitalizations, 21% of whom died during follow-up, with an incident mortality rate of 8.7 deaths per 100 PYs and an adjusted hazard ratio of 4.25 (95% confidence interval: 3.27 to 5.32). The risk for death was highest in the first 30days and declined over time for all hospitalization categories. Patients not hospitalized for HF or for any cause had observed incident mortality rates of 3.8 and 1.3 deaths per 100 PYs, respectively. Conclusions: In I-PRESERVE, HFpEF patients hospitalized for any reason, and especially for HF, were at high risk for subsequent death, particularly early. The findings support the need for careful attention in the post-discharge time period including attention to comorbid conditions. Among those hospitalized for HF, the high mortality rate and increased proportion of readmissions due to HF (highest during the first 30 days), suggest that this group would be an appropriate target for investigation of new interventions. © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation.


PubMed | University of Minnesota, Georgetown University, Monash University, McMaster University and 6 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of cardiac failure | Year: 2016

The prognostic merit of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) is unknown in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).Baseline IGFBP7 (BL-IGFBP7; n=302) and 6-month change (; n=293) were evaluated in the Irbesartan in Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction (I-PRESERVE) trial. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization with median follow-up of 3.6 years; secondary outcomes included HF events. Median BL-IGFBP7 concentration was 218ng/mL. BL-IGFBP7 was significantly correlated with age (RHigher concentrations of IGFBP7 were associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, but after multivariable adjustment this association was no longer present. Further studies of IGFBP7 are needed to elucidate its mechanism.www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00095238.


Inglis S.C.,British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Center | Inglis S.C.,University of Technology, Sydney | Lewsey J.D.,University of Glasgow | Chandler D.,NHS Dumfries and Galloway | And 3 more authors.
British Journal of Surgery | Year: 2012

Background: This study examined trends for all first hospital admissions for peripheral artery disease (PAD) in Scotland from 1991 to 2007 using the Scottish Morbidity Record. Methods: First admissions to hospital for PAD were defined as an admission to hospital (inpatient and day-case) with a principal diagnosis of PAD, with no previous admission to hospital (principal or secondary diagnosis) for PAD in the previous 10 years. Results: From 1991 to 2007, 41 593 individuals were admitted to hospital in Scotland for the first time for PAD. Some 23 016 (55.3 per cent) were men (mean(s.d.) age 65.7(11.7) years) and 18 577 were women (aged 70.4(12.8) years). For both sexes the population rate of first admissions to hospital for PAD declined over the study interval: from 66.7 per 100 000 in 1991-1993 to 39.7 per 100 000 in 2006-2007 among men, and from 43.5 to 29.1 per 100 000 respectively among women. After adjustment, the decline was estimated to be 42 per cent in men and 27 per cent in women (rate ratio for 2007 versus 1991: 0.58 (95 per cent confidence interval 0.55 to 0.62) in men and 0.73 (0.68 to 0.78) in women). The intervention rate fell from 80.8 to 74.4 per cent in men and from 77.9 to 64.9 per cent in women. The proportion of hospital admissions as an emergency or transfer increased, from 23.9 to 40.7 per cent among men and from 30.0 to 49.5 per cent among women. Conclusion: First hospital admission for PAD in Scotland declined steadily and substantially between 1991 and 2007, with an increase in the proportion that was unplanned. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The British journal of surgery | Year: 2012

This study examined trends for all first hospital admissions for peripheral artery disease (PAD) in Scotland from 1991 to 2007 using the Scottish Morbidity Record.First admissions to hospital for PAD were defined as an admission to hospital (inpatient and day-case) with a principal diagnosis of PAD, with no previous admission to hospital (principal or secondary diagnosis) for PAD in the previous 10 years.From 1991 to 2007, 41,593 individuals were admitted to hospital in Scotland for the first time for PAD. Some 23,016 (55.3 per cent) were men (mean(s.d.) age 65.7(11.7) years) and 18,577 were women (aged 70.4(12.8) years). For both sexes the population rate of first admissions to hospital for PAD declined over the study interval: from 66.7 per 100,000 in 1991-1993 to 39.7 per 100,000 in 2006-2007 among men, and from 43.5 to 29.1 per 100,000 respectively among women. After adjustment, the decline was estimated to be 42 per cent in men and 27 per cent in women (rate ratio for 2007 versus 1991: 0.58 (95 per cent confidence interval 0.55 to 0.62) in men and 0.73 (0.68 to 0.78) in women). The intervention rate fell from 80.8 to 74.4 per cent in men and from 77.9 to 64.9 per cent in women. The proportion of hospital admissions as an emergency or transfer increased, from 23.9 to 40.7 per cent among men and from 30.0 to 49.5 per cent among women.First hospital admission for PAD in Scotland declined steadily and substantially between 1991 and 2007, with an increase in the proportion that was unplanned.

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