Laie, HI, United States

Brigham Young University - Hawaii

www.byuh.edu
Laie, HI, United States

Brigham Young University–Hawaii is a private university located in Laie, Hawaii, United States. It is owned and operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints .BYU-Hawaii was founded in 1955 and offers programs in mathematics, liberal arts, and management. The university is broadly organized into four colleges, and its parent organization, the Church Educational System, sponsors sister schools in Utah and Idaho. The university's sole focus is on undergraduate education.Approximately 97% of the university's 2,800 students are members of the LDS Church. BYU-Hawaii students are required to follow an honor code, which requires behavior in line with LDS teachings . A BYU-Hawaii education is less expensive than similar private universities since a large portion of tuition is funded by LDS Church tithing funds.The university partners with the LDS Church-owned Polynesian Cultural Center, the largest living museum in the State of Hawaii, which employs roughly one third of the student body. Its athletic teams compete in Division II of the NCAA and are collectively known as the BYU-Hawaii Seasiders. They are members of the Pacific West Conference and have won 19 national titles. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LAIE, Hawaii--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC), today announced it will launch a Million Visitor Per Year Initiative, as part of a transformative strategy crafted by the management team which is led by P. Alfred Grace, president and CEO. The initiative will enable the PCC to advance its mission which includes preserving and portraying the cultures of Polynesia and providing jobs for international students from the Asia Pacific region who attend Brigham Young University (BYU) – Hawaii. The Polynesian Cultural Center is one of the largest employers on the North Shore of Oahu with 1,200 employees including 750 students and 200 community members working part-time. The Polynesian Cultural Center is a non-profit organization that has been affiliated with BYU-Hawaii since its inception 54 years ago and provides education and employment opportunities for students through the I-WORK program. “Many of our student employees come from the pacific islands and countries where they have limited opportunities for employment experience and education. Some students working part time at a minimum wage job will still be the most significant wage earner in their family,” said Grace. The I-WORK program, which stands for International Work Opportunity Returnability Kuleana, supplements up to 100% of the individual costs for students’ attendance and is funded by donations, family contributions and work opportunities at the PCC. Part of the program is a commitment from the student to return home with the goal that they are better able to contribute to their family, their community and their local economy, creating a positive ripple effect that can have a significant impact. Grace stated, “By launching this million visitor initiative, we will make the turnstiles turn and that will enable us to hire and positively impact the lives of more students. We are all about providing more opportunities for more students. That is the heart of our mission and purpose. That is our reason for being.” “Our student employees gain experience that will contribute to any employment they seek in the future,” said Eric Workman, executive vice president for the Polynesian Cultural Center. “When they leave us, the combination of an excellent education and engagement with visitors from all over the world, along with leadership opportunities that come as a result of working at the PCC, prepares them to be better global citizens and positions them to make significant contributions to their native culture when they return home.” Through new marketing efforts in China and Japan, coupled with greater promotional efforts to attract visitors from the Northeast, East Coast, and the Southern United States, the new initiative will allow the Polynesian Cultural Center to create more jobs and expand the positive influence of the ancient cultures and customs of Polynesia to a growing number of visitors from around the world. “Our mission is dear to us and this initiative could not come at a more relevant time,” Grace continued. “There is a growing body of research that documents millennials’ interest in changing the world and looking for authentic purpose-driven work and experiences. Everything we do at the PCC matches up with their priorities. We know the time is right to increase visitors to the PCC by showing the world the beautiful, ancient cultures of Polynesia and providing new opportunities for its progeny.” The management team of the PCC is staffed with former students and performers whose insights stem from their collective decades of involvement with the organization. With growth initiatives that are in place, the PCC has already driven a record rise in visitors through 2016 when guest traffic increased by 30 percent. Growth initiatives have included the opening of The Hukilau Marketplace, which is a collection of nine dining venues, including the flagship restaurant, Pounders, and twelve shopping venues which has contributed to the recent uptick in guest traffic. The marketplace celebrated its 2nd anniversary on March 11th. To date, more than 39 million people have been to the Polynesian Cultural Center and over 20,000 BYU-Hawaii students in total have been employed over its 54-year history. Located on Oahu’s beautiful North Shore, the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC), owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the only cultural tourist attraction of its kind in the world and a favorite of visitors to Hawaii. An engaging, interactive celebration showcasing the people, culture, arts and crafts of Polynesia, the PCC has entertained more than 39 million visitors from around the world in its first 50 years (1963-2013). A non-profit organization, 100 percent of PCC’s revenue goes to daily operations and to support the education of its student-employees from neighboring Brigham Young University-Hawaii.


LAIE, Hawaii--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC), a non-profit organization that protects and preserves Polynesian culture to share with visitors from around the world, will host, along with the Polynesian Football Hall of Fame (PFHoF) a draft day luau on Friday, April 28 in Philadelphia. The PFHoF will recognize the PCC for its contributions to Polynesian culture, and particularly, Polynesian youth – hundreds of whom are able to attend college thanks to the PCC’s I-WORK program that employs part-time approximately 500 college students. PCC also employs an additional 250 part-time students from the mainland, connecting with them with their Polynesian roots. Hawaiian Airlines, which is celebrating the five-year anniversary of its direct flight from New York to Honolulu this year, will raffle off two round-trip tickets to Oahu at the Draft Day Luau. The raffle prize includes a three-night stay at the Courtyard Marriott Oahu North Shore that is conveniently located next to the PCC, and two VIP tickets to the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC). The Draft Day Luau will feature authentic Polynesian dishes prepared by the Executive Chef of Pounders Restaurant at the Polynesian Cultural Center, Felix Tai, and the luau style food will be served pupu style at the event. Several PCC Cultural Ambassadors and friends of the PCC will provide entertainment and will include, among other things, authentic music, Tongan drumming, Samoan slap dancing, and Tahitian hula dancing. For more information, and to RSVP for the event, please contact Susan Surillo at PCC-Luau@coltrin.com or call 212-221-1616. Located on Oahu’s beautiful North Shore, the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC), owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the only cultural tourist attraction of its kind in the world and a favorite of all visitors to Hawaii. An engaging, interactive celebration showcasing the people, culture, arts and crafts of Polynesia, the PCC has entertained more than 39 million visitors from around the world in its first 50 years (1963-2013). A non-profit organization, 100 percent of PCC’s revenue goes to daily operations and to support the education of its student-employees from neighboring Brigham Young University-Hawaii. ABOUT THE POLYNESIAN FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME The Polynesian Football Hall of Fame honors Polynesia’s greatest players, coaches and contributors. It also serves as a resource for Polynesian football history, provides academic scholarships and supports educational programs for Polynesian youth. Its permanent home is located at the Polynesian Cultural Center (O’ahu’s North Shore) and was established in 2013 by Super Bowl Champions Jesse Sapolu and Ma’a Tanuvasa. Other board members include Troy Polamalu, Vai Sikahema, June Jones and Reno Mahe. For more information, visit www.PolynesianFootballHOF.org. Hawaiian®, the world's most punctual airline as reported by OAG, has led all U.S. carriers in on-time performance for each of the past 13 years (2004-2016) as reported by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Consumer surveys by Condé Nast Traveler and Travel + Leisure have ranked Hawaiian the highest of all domestic airlines serving Hawai'i. Now in its 88th year of continuous service, Hawaiian is Hawai'i's biggest and longest-serving airline, as well as the largest provider of passenger air service from its primary visitor markets on the U.S. Mainland. Hawaiian offers non-stop service to Hawai'i from more U.S. gateway cities (11) than any other airline, along with service from Japan, South Korea, China, Australia, New Zealand, American Samoa and Tahiti. Hawaiian also provides approximately 160 jet flights daily between the Hawaiian Islands, with a total of more than 200 daily flights system-wide. Hawaiian Airlines, Inc. is a subsidiary of Hawaiian Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: HA). Additional information is available at HawaiianAirlines.com. Follow updates on Twitter about Hawaiian (@HawaiianAir) and its special fare offers (@HawaiianFares), and become a fan on its Facebook page. For career postings and updates, follow Hawaiian's LinkedIn page. Courtyard by Marriott offers a refreshing environment that helps guests stay connected, productive and balanced. Intuitive services and design accommodate guests’ needs for choice and control. With over 1,000 locations in over 40 destinations, Courtyard hotels participate in the award-winning Marriott Rewards® frequent travel program that allows members to earn hotel points or airline miles for every pound spent during each stay. For more information or reservations, call the Courtyard toll-free number at 800-321-2211, visit courtyard.marriott.com, become a fan at www.facebook.com/courtyard or follow Courtyard at www.twitter.com/courtyardhotels.


Curtis A.M.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii | Dennis A.R.,Indiana University Bloomington | McNamara K.O.,Mississippi State University
MIS Quarterly: Management Information Systems | Year: 2017

Organizations often build virtual teams to draw information from different parts of the organization to enable better decisions. However, communication patterns among virtual team members often resemble multiple monologues (in which team members broadcast what they know) rather than dialogues (in which team members mindfully share information they have and consider information from others). The result is that team members often fail to integrate the new information they receive from other team members into their mental models, and decision quality suffers. Collective mindfulness is a team-level process in which team members heedfully contribute to the team discussion, align their own actions with the actions of others, and develop shared mental models. Collective mindfulness is more than a sum of individual mindfulness in much the same way that organizational learning is more than the sum of the individual learning of its members. We compared teams using a traditional synchronous text chat tool to teams using a combination of tools designed to promote collective mindfulness (chat plus a whiteboard). The results suggest that teams using chat plus the whiteboard had increased collective mindfulness, and that this increased collective mindfulness led to improved decision quality. Not all teams were effective in using the whiteboard, indicating it was not the provision of the whiteboard that mattered, but rather how teams appropriated it. We identified four appropriations, the combination of which led to increased collective mindfulness and decision quality: information aggregation, discussion of information distribution, discussion of decision criteria, and voting. If any one of the appropriations was missing, collective mindfulness and decision quality suffered.


Dennis A.R.,Indiana University Bloomington | Robert Jr. L.P.,University of Michigan | Curtis A.M.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii | Kowalczyk S.T.,Indiana University Bloomington | Hasty B.K.,Air Force Institute of Technology
Information Systems Research | Year: 2012

Research in face-to-face teams shows conflicting results about the impact of behavioral controls on trust; some research shows that controls increase the salience of good behavior, which increases trust while other research shows that controls increase the salience of poor behavior that decreases trust. The only study in virtual teams, which examined poorly functioning teams, found that controls increased the salience of poor behavior, which decreased trust. We argue that in virtual teams behavioral controls amplify the salience of all behaviors (positive and negative) and that an individual's selective perception bias influences how these behaviors are interpreted. Thus the link from behavioral controls to trust is more complex than first thought. We conducted a 2×2 experiment, varying the use of behavioral controls (controls, no controls) and individual team member behaviors (reneging behaviors designed to reduce trust beliefs and fulfilling behaviors designed to increase trust beliefs). We found that behavioral controls did amplify the salience of all behaviors; however, contrary to what we expected, this actually weakened the impact of reneging and fulfilling behaviors on trust. We believe that completing a formal evaluation increased empathy and the awareness of context in which the behaviors occurred and thus mitigated extreme perceptions. We also found that behavioral controls increased the selective perception bias which induced participants to see the behaviors their disposition to trust expected rather than the behaviors that actually occurred. © 2012 INFORMS.


Interview with the Author of the Children's Book "The Boy That Wanted Clean Teeth" Dr. Glenn Banks DDS grew up in Southern California, and is the youngest of 9 children. He attended undergrad at Brigham Young University-Hawaii with a major in Biology and a minor in Chemistry. He then obtained his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Indiana University School of Dentistry. Dr Banks is a member of the American Dental Association, and the Academy of General Dentistry. Interview with the author: So why did you choose to write this book? "I think a lot of people that have dreams of becoming an author but for whatever reason have not fulfilled that desire. The incident that inspired me to actually start writing was one time I visited my sister and read a children's book to my niece. During that book and reading the jokes, I thought to myself I could do a book at least as good as this." How did you choose the topic for the book? "I am a dentist, and I see lots of children that don’t brush adequately. I am hoping that this book may help get more people brushing for two minutes two time a day (#2min2x)" Is there anything special about the characters? "The main character has the same name as my nephew Aiden. Then the other character I had the illustrator Violeta Honasan use my likeness. I think she did an excellent job with the images and my likeness." How did you choose which languages to have the book translated into? "Initially, I picked the most commonly used languages to translate. Later, I try to expand the language sets for the book. I have a long time Mongolian friend and I asked him to translate the book into Mongolian because of the friendship. It turns out that my book is the only Mongolian language children's book available on Amazon. In the future, I would also like to have the book translated into other more obscure languages. Especially, I'd like to find a translator for Hawaiian, if possible, since I lived in Hawaii for a few years." Do you plan to write anymore books? "Yes, I am strictly focusing on children's books and right now I am hoping to have a new book out every one to two years. I have several ideas and currently they have the same dental theme." What do you do in your spare time? "I try to read at least one book a month, and keep track/rate on goodreads. I also am a gardener, trying to grow edible fruits. I also do guerrilla gardening, or try to plant fruiting trees in fields that I hope to visit later and harvest. I have also located a few areas that have abundant dewberry and grapes that grow wild for harvesting." #glennbanksdds https://www.amazon.com/Boy-that-Wanted-Clean-Teeth/dp/1943417016 https://www.facebook.com/bbrightdental/ Houston, TX, February 13, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Dr. Glenn Banks DDS is excited to announce the publication of his first book "The Boy that Wanted Clean Teeth." The book is available in 16 languages and multiple online retailers.Dr. Glenn Banks DDS grew up in Southern California, and is the youngest of 9 children. He attended undergrad at Brigham Young University-Hawaii with a major in Biology and a minor in Chemistry. He then obtained his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Indiana University School of Dentistry. Dr Banks is a member of the American Dental Association, and the Academy of General Dentistry.Interview with the author:So why did you choose to write this book?"I think a lot of people that have dreams of becoming an author but for whatever reason have not fulfilled that desire. The incident that inspired me to actually start writing was one time I visited my sister and read a children's book to my niece. During that book and reading the jokes, I thought to myself I could do a book at least as good as this."How did you choose the topic for the book?"I am a dentist, and I see lots of children that don’t brush adequately. I am hoping that this book may help get more people brushing for two minutes two time a day (#2min2x)"Is there anything special about the characters?"The main character has the same name as my nephew Aiden. Then the other character I had the illustrator Violeta Honasan use my likeness. I think she did an excellent job with the images and my likeness."How did you choose which languages to have the book translated into?"Initially, I picked the most commonly used languages to translate. Later, I try to expand the language sets for the book. I have a long time Mongolian friend and I asked him to translate the book into Mongolian because of the friendship. It turns out that my book is the only Mongolian language children's book available on Amazon. In the future, I would also like to have the book translated into other more obscure languages. Especially, I'd like to find a translator for Hawaiian, if possible, since I lived in Hawaii for a few years."Do you plan to write anymore books?"Yes, I am strictly focusing on children's books and right now I am hoping to have a new book out every one to two years. I have several ideas and currently they have the same dental theme."What do you do in your spare time?"I try to read at least one book a month, and keep track/rate on goodreads. I also am a gardener, trying to grow edible fruits. I also do guerrilla gardening, or try to plant fruiting trees in fields that I hope to visit later and harvest. I have also located a few areas that have abundant dewberry and grapes that grow wild for harvesting."#glennbanksddshttps://www.amazon.com/Boy-that-Wanted-Clean-Teeth/dp/1943417016https://www.facebook.com/bbrightdental/ Front Cover of the Book "The Boy that Wanted Clean Teeth" is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Malay, Mongolian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, Urdu, Vietnamese Filename: Frontcover.jpg Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Glenn Banks DDS


Madsen K.E.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2016

Fear research faces a dilemma as typical methods of induction elicit passive or indirect fear, rather than authentic or direct fear. The present study investigated and compared the effects of interactivity, or agency, on the physiological responses of participants as measures of direct fear as they either played or watched a horror-themed video game. Assuming agency allows for greater immersion, the former group would exhibit greater physiological responses, possibly indicating greater fear reaction. Change scores were calculated from subtracting baseline mean values from exposure mean values for every participant in measures of electrodermal activity (EDA), respiratory rate (RR), and heart rate (HR). Self-reported fear data was also gathered for every participant. Players had a significantly greater increase than watchers in EDA, RR, and HR change scores. Players and watchers did not differ significantly in self-reported fear. Change score t tests for specific events that occur in the video game are also reported. These results suggest that the variable of agency may have had the effect of inducing a greater fear response and that it provides utility for researchers seeking to ethically induce direct fear. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Tsang T.-H.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii | Gubler D.A.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Tetrahedron Letters | Year: 2012

Herein we report a concise total synthesis of farylhydrazones A and B, naturally occurring phenylhydrazones recently isolated from cultures of the Cordyceps-colonizing fungus Isaria farinosa, completed in six and five steps respectively starting from 2-nitrobenzoic acid. The synthesis is completely scalable, and highly convergent - making it adaptable for the preparation of analogues and investigation into the biological activity of these unique natural products. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Thomas R.J.,Mayo Medical School | Denna T.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Current Cardiology Reports | Year: 2014

Growing evidence highlights the important role of post-hospitalization care (i.e., secondary prevention) for patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). While secondary prevention therapies are available that improve patient outcomes, receipt of those treatments by patients is suboptimal. Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are systematic, effective models of care that improve delivery of preventive therapies and patient outcomes after ACS, but unfortunately, patient participation in CR/SP has been suboptimal, due to patient-, provider-, and system-based barriers. Systematic processes, including automatic referral processes, help reduce these barriers and improve CR/SP participation, along with the associated health benefits. Strength of physician endorsement of CR/SP participation is another key step in improving CR/SP participation and patient outcomes following ACS. Accountability measures for CR/SP referral and enrollment, including performance measures and other quality of care methods, may help improve CR/SP delivery. Early evidence suggests that these measures have helped improve referral of eligible patients to CR/SP programs. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Meyers J.E.,Concussion Clinic | Miller R.M.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii | Tuita A.R.R.,Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Applied Neuropsychology:Adult | Year: 2014

Distinguishing between traumatic brain injury (TBI) residuals and the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during neuropsychological evaluation can be difficult because of significant overlap of symptom presentation. Using a standardized battery of tests, an artificial neural network was used to create an algorithm to perform pattern analysis matching (PAM) functions that can be used to assist with diagnosis. PAM analyzes a patient's neuropsychological data and provides a best fit classification, according to one of four groups: TBI, PTSD, malingering/invalid data, or "other" (depressed/anxious/postconcussion syndrome/normal). The original PAM was modeled on civilian data; the current study was undertaken using a database of 100 active-duty army service personnel who were referred for neuropsychological assessment in a military TBI clinic. The PAM classifications showed 90% overall accuracy when compared with clinicians' diagnoses. The PAM function is able to classify detailed neuropsychological profiles from a military population with a high degree of accuracy and is able to distinguish between TBI, PTSD, malingering/invalid data, or "other." PAM is a useful tool to help with clinical decision-making. © 2014 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Patent
Brigham Young University - Hawaii | Date: 2013-04-05

A method for training an image processing neural network without human selection of features may include providing a training set of images labeled with two or more classifications, providing an image processing toolbox with image transforms that can be applied to the training set, generating a random set of feature extraction pipelines, where each feature extraction pipeline includes a sequence of image transforms randomly selected from the image processing toolbox and randomly selected control parameters associated with the sequence of image transforms. The method may also include coupling a first stage classifier to an output of each feature extraction pipeline and executing a genetic algorithm to conduct genetic modification of each feature extraction pipeline and train each first stage classifier on the training set, and coupling a second stage classifier to each of the first stage classifiers in order to increase classification accuracy.

Loading Brigham Young University - Hawaii collaborators
Loading Brigham Young University - Hawaii collaborators