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News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sightly, a performance video advertising platform that leverages People-Centered Audience Targeting™ to deliver personalized ads to the most receptive viewers in YouTube, announced today that it expanded its leadership team and its number of offices. The company promoted Adam Katz to Vice President of Sales in New York, and hired Jill Gutierrez, Senior Account Executive, in Los Angeles. Digital video viewing is widespread in the U.S. According to eMarketer, by 2020, there will be 232.1 million digital video viewers, representing 83.1% of the country’s internet users and nearly two-thirds of its residents. Sightly focuses on helping video advertisers accurately target their viewing audiences and achieve maximum ROI. “Video advertising is evolving rapidly, more media buyers are searching for strategies and technologies that will help them hit their KPIs. Adam has been at the forefront of this video advertising evolution, and in his new role at Sightly he will be an asset to any customer that wants to leverage video to connect with their audience,” said Larry Harris, Chief Strategy Officer at Sightly. “And Jill has a terrific track record of helping agencies and brands meet their goals programmatically that fits perfectly with our team’s focus on helping customers bring their media plans to life and exceed their campaign KPI’s.” “Prior to joining the company, I was on Sightly’s advisory board for a year. That experience gave me the opportunity to witness the unique way precision targeted personalized video increases relevance and drives performance,” commented Mr. Katz. “I am thrilled to be a part of the leadership team at Sightly and I’m looking forward to continuously delivering video advertising value to agencies and brands.” According to the IAB, total digital video, including mobile and desktop, rose to $3.9 billion in HY 2016, up 51% from $2.6 billion in HY 2015. The traction of digital video in the advertising industry is also underscored in a study from marketing agency Strata1 who reported that, in August 2016, 68.6% of respondents expressed some level of confidence in video ad ROI, up from 54% in November 2015. Ms. Gutierrez comes to the company with more than a decade of experience across a variety of media and advertising disciplines at digital companies AOL, Kiosked and Steelhouse. “I am excited about demonstrating the power of our data-driven approach to media buyers,” said Ms. Gutierrez, who will be reporting to Mr. Katz. A Sightly veteran, Mr. Katz opened the New York office and helped develop the company’s go-to-market strategy. Before joining Sightly, Mr. Katz was the first-to-market enterprise executive at Nomi, where he helped the company break into the QSR and retail verticals in advance of its acquisition by Brickstream. He also worked on business development teams at PubMatic and Yahoo!. Founded in 2013, Sightly is a performance video advertising platform that enables brands and agencies to deliver the most relevant messages to the most receptive viewers across every device on YouTube and other video destinations. Our TargetView™ software combines our proprietary People-Centered Audience Targeting™ with dynamic ad personalization, campaign management automation and innovative optimization data science to deliver audience and performance KPI’s across the entire customer journey. Learn more at www.sightly.com.


Trademark
Brickstream | Date: 2013-06-20

Downloadable software for analyzing movement of people in physical spaces; downloadable software for analyzing people traffic in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues. Provision of information relating to movement of consumers in physical spaces; generating and providing reports to others concerning activity and movement of people in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues. Software-as-a-service (SAAS) services for analyzing movement of people in physical spaces; providing temporary use of non-downloadable software for analyzing people traffic in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues.


Trademark
Brickstream | Date: 2013-06-20

Electronic devices for capturing and analyzing customer behavioral data; video analytic devices including video cameras and software for collecting and analyzing consumer behavioral data; self-contained video sensor devices for capturing and analyzing traffic metrics, queue metrics, service metrics, and full store track data in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues; downloadable software for remotely managing electronic video analytic devices for monitoring and collecting data relating to the functioning, configuration, operability, and location of the devices. Provision of information relating to consumer behavioral data; generating and providing reports to others concerning consumer behavioral data; provision of information relating to behavioral data of others, namely, traffic metrics, queue metrics, service metrics, and full store track data in physical spaces or facilities; provision of information relating to consumer behavioral data in physical locations, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues. Software-as-a-service (SAAS) services for remotely managing electronic video analytic devices and for monitoring and collecting data relating to the functioning, configuration, operability, and location of the devices.


Trademark
Brickstream | Date: 2013-06-20

Downloadable software for analyzing queue metrics; downloadable software for analyzing queues of people in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues. Provision of information relating to consumer activity in queues and lines in physical spaces; generating and providing reports to others concerning activity of people in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues. Software-as-a-service (SAAS) services for analyzing queue metrics; providing temporary use of non-downloadable software for analyzing queues of people in physical spaces, namely, retail stores, hospitals, transportation venues, and entertainment venues.


ATLANTA, GA--(Marketwired - Oct 27, 2015) - NOMi, the world's leading in-store marketing and analytics provider, today announced a newly issued patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), Patent No. 9,124,778, for new tracking and analysis technologies. The patent, titled "Apparatuses and Methods for Disparity-Based Tracking and Analysis of Objects in a Region of Interest," describes technologies currently available in the Brickstream LIVE sensor. NOMi expects to utilize this technology in future products. This patent broadly relates to an integrated multi-lens video platform with integrated software for collecting data from each lens and merging the same into a unified data output. The Brickstream LIVE is a single integrated unit comprising two disparity-based stereo image sensors for capturing stereo image data and a single high-resolution sensor for capturing high-resolution and/or color data. NOMi has a total of 12 patents granted for technology currently used in their family of Brickstream sensors. "Previously, if a company wished to capture a high-resolution video stream for security while also executing high quality stereo vision analytics, at least two separate sensor systems would be necessary. This increases total cost of ownership of the system," stated Ralph Crabtree, Chief Technology Officer of NOMi. "Furthermore," Crabtree continued, "the sensor can be properly configured to support both LP applications and accurate business analytics such as door counting or service monitoring." The Brickstream LIVE was first announced in January 2015, and combines 3D stereo analytics with a high-resolution video camera for loss prevention. The device uses stereovision analytics to detect people and their movements accurately and anonymously. The result is the most accurate technology for tracking people's behavior in a physical space. For more information on how this innovative, patented technology is utilized in the Brickstream LIVE, please visit http://www.nomi.com/sensors/brickstream-live/ About NOMi With 150,000 sensors deployed worldwide across 1000+ customers and 55 global partners, NOMi is the market leader in retail store analytics. By combining best-in-class sensor hardware with a comprehensive software suite, NOMi helps businesses deliver the best possible in-store experience by maximizing efficiency across operations, marketing, mobile, and loss prevention. For more information, visit: http://www.nomi.com/


News Article | November 20, 2013
Site: venturebeat.com

Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) might be the best thing to happen to physical retail in a long, long time. Shopkick today announced shopBeacon, its new Bluetooth-LE-based platform that uses shoppers’ in-store locations to serve them department-level recommendations, deals, and rewards. Shopkick CEO Cyriac Roeding puts it another way. “Shopkick brings the things you love about Amazon into the physical word. It’s the perfect mesh of physical meets digital,” he told VentureBeat. Think of it like this: Right now when you enter a Macy’s (which is Shopkick’s first shopBeacon partner), the store has no real idea who you are or what departments you frequent. That automatically puts Macy’s and its kin at a huge disadvantage compared to Amazon, which keeps track of what you search for and click on to recommend things you have a good chance of buying. ShopBeacon changes that. With the service (which is opt-in, fortunately), Macy’s can send you deals as soon as you enter one of its stores, giving it a powerful new way to sell you things. More, the app also taps into Apple’s iBeacon, which can remind you to open up the Shopkick app as soon as you enter a store. Shopkick isn’t alone here. Companies like Index (which just raised $7 million), Brickstream, and Euclid Analytics are all working on ways to bring online-like recommendations and analytics to offline retail. The difference? Shopkick says it’s consumer-facing, and has no plans to share or sell user data with retailers.


News Article | April 14, 2014
Site: venturebeat.com

Should being tracked while you are shopping inside a store be considered creepy? Not according to behavior-intelligence company Brickstream, which helps brick-and-mortar retailers track and analyze shopper’s behaviors. What’s more, it looks like the startup just bagged about $8.7 million in new funding, according to an SEC filing today. Although the document does not provide much detail, it does state that the first sale was made on March 17, 2014;  six investors have signed on thus far; and the company is seeking about $167,000 more for this round. Brickstream provides sensors that retailers install inside their stores. The sensors then track and analyze data to help retailers manage waiting lines, track foot traffic, reduce theft, increase security monitoring, and extract other behavior intelligence. The company’s products and services can also be used in entertainment venues, hospitals, high-traffic areas such as airports, and much more. Brickstream is not the only company working to help brick-and-mortar retailers engage more with their shoppers. Index and Euclid also provide tracking and analysis of store shoppers to help retailers personalize shoppers’ experiences and gather data on shoppers’ behaviors. Shopkick, on the other hand, is consumer-facing and provides shoppers with special offers (called “kicks”) when they enter a participating store. Brickstream was founded in 2000 and is based in Norcross, Ga. Previous investors include Columbia Capital, Mohr Davidow Ventures, and RBC Technology Ventures. The company also raised a total of $21.5 million prior to this round.


News Article | April 14, 2014
Site: venturebeat.com

Napster cofounder and billionaire Sean Parker has raised a $9.3 million round of funding for new startup Brigade Media, according to an SEC doc filed today. Brigade Media apparently aims to boost the level of civic engagement (such as voting) among U.S. residents, reports Politico. In addition to Parker, both Ron Conway and Marc Benioff are said to be participating in the round. Read more on VentureBeat. Should being tracked while you are shopping inside a store be considered creepy? Not according to behavior-intelligence company Brickstream, which helps brick-and-mortar retailers track and analyze shopper’s behaviors. What’s more, it looks like the startup just bagged about $8.7 million in new funding, according to an SEC filing today. Read more on VentureBeat. “Crowdfunding site SeedInvest today will ask its own community to back it with $1 million, to top off the $2 million it has already raised from venture capitalists for its Series A round.” via Recode


News Article | July 15, 2013
Site: www.techhive.com

From the “just a little creepy” department: Brick-and-mortar stores are experimenting with Wi-Fi and advanced video surveillance to track customers as they shop. The New York Times brings word of the trend, noting that Family Dollar, Cabela’s, Benetton, and Warby Parker are among the stores that are testing these technologies. Nordstrom also tried tracking users via their Wi-Fi signals, and even posted signs alerting customers to the practice, but the store abandoned the effort in May after customers complained. Stores aren’t able to glean personal information this way, but with Wi-Fi tracking services such as RetailNext, they can figure out how long shoppers stay, where they tend to look around, and whether they end up going to the register. Because smartphones are constantly looking for Wi-Fi signals, stores can detect the location of those phones within a 10-foot radius, even if the shopper isn’t connected to the network, the Times reports. Slightly more unnerving is the use of advanced video technologies to learn even more about shoppers as they browse. The Times describes a $1500 stereoscopic camera from Brickstream that can separate adults from children, and technology from Realeyes that can detect people’s emotions. Better cameras and image processing have made these technologies possible. Creepy as it seems, shoppers should realize that these forms of tracking aren’t much different than the tracking cookies that online retailers use to follow people around the Web. If anything, tracking cookies are even more intrusive, because they are able to put together broader profiles of users as they use the Internet and tie those profiles to a single unique identifier. And while the overall idea of being followed is unnerving, the goal of merchants, both online and offline, is to provide a better shopping experience. Just as tracking cookies aim to serve more accurate advertisements, retailers hope to figure out how people shop, and adjust their stores accordingly. To what extent that actually helps sell more products is another question, one that’s unaddressed by the Times story. But as one commenter points out, the big advantage brick-and-mortar stores have is the ability to make personal connections with customers. It’d be a shame to squander that advantage in pursuit of making the real world more like the online one.

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