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Kapandríti, Greece

Atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT)/well-differentiated liposarcoma (WDL) of the pectoralis major muscle is an exceedingly rare clinical entity. We describe here a case of intramuscular ALT/WDL of the pectoralis major muscle in a female patient who presented with clinical manifestations of a rapidly growing breast tumor. Diagnostic evaluation and management of the patient are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. We conclude that although the clinical examination may be inconclusive, the mammogram and especially the magnetic resonance imaging scan can precisely delineate the anatomic location and extent of the ALT/WDL of the pectoralis major muscle, thus allowing a correct preoperative diagnosis and adequate preoperative surgical planning. Complete resection is the treatment of choice for ALT/WDL. Long-term follow-up, however, remains mandatory because of the risk of local recurrence or delayed dedifferentiation. Source


Salemis N.S.,Breast Cancer Surgery Unit
Breast Disease | Year: 2012

Anticoagulant-induced spontaneous breast hematoma is a very rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported in the literature so far. We describe a case of a spontaneous breast hematoma in a female patient under combined oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. Physicians should be aware of this possibility in patients under anticoagulant treatment presenting with sudden onset of breast pain and a palpable mass. Repeat imaging is mandatory until complete clinical and imaging resolution of the hematoma. If an abnormality persists, further investigation is needed to exclude an underlying malignancy. © 2012/2013-IOS Press and the authors. Source


Salemis N.S.,Breast Cancer Surgery Unit | Merkouris S.,Army General Hospital | Kimpouri K.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Breast Disease | Year: 2011

Background: Mondor's disease is a rare benign clinical entity characterized by thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of the anterolateral thoraco-abdominal wall. Although several predisposing factors have been reported, the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients older than 14 years who were diagnosed with Mondor's disease of the breast at the Breast Cancer Surgery Unit of Army General Hospital over a 3-year period. Results: Five cases of Mondor's disease were identified among 5717 breast examinations performed during the study period. In 4 patients the disease was considered to be idiopathic. Ultrasonography established the diagnosis in all patients but mammography was inconclusive in two cases due to the presence of dense breast tissue. Four patients received symptomatic treatment. All patients had complete clinical resolution within 2-8 weeks of presentation, and they are well without any evidence of recurrence for 3 to 32 months later. No cases were associated with breast cancer. Conclusions: Mondor's disease of the breast is a rare benign self-limiting clinical entity. Ultrasonography is the diagnostic modality of choice but mammography may be inconclusive in the presence of dense breast tissue. Awareness of this rare entity is mandatory to prevent an unnecessary biopsy whereas the patients should be reassured of the benign nature of this disorder. Thorough evaluation is however necessary to rule out an underlying breast cancer or another systemic disease. © 2011/2012 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Source


Salemis N.S.,Breast Cancer Surgery Unit | Nakos G.,Army General Hospital | Tsiambas E.,Army General Hospital | Tsantilas V.,Breast Cancer Surgery Unit | Seretis C.,Breast Cancer Surgery Unit
Breast Disease | Year: 2012

Myofibroblastoma of the breast (MFB) is a rare benign tumor of mesenchymal origin with only 80 cases reported in the literature so far. It most commonly occurs in elderly males and postmenopausal females and grows slowly over a period of months to years. In this study we describe a very rare case of a MFB in a premenopausal woman who presented with a rapidly growing breast mass. Diagnostic evaluation and management of the patient are discussed along with a review of the literature. We conclude that despite its rarity, myofibroblastoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal breast tumors. No specific imaging features have been described. Thorough immunohistochemical analysis is crucial to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Local excision is the treatment of choice. © 2012/2013-IOS Press and the authors. Source

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