BRE Ltd.

Garston, United Kingdom
Garston, United Kingdom

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Hirst E.A.J.,University of Bath | Walker P.,University of Bath | Paine K.A.,University of Bath | Yates T.,BRE Ltd
Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Construction Materials | Year: 2012

Hemp-lime is a sustainable low-carbon composite building material that combines renewably sourced hemp shiv (a coproduct of hemp fibre crop production) with formulated lime-based binders. To date, its primary use has been to form solid external walls in timber-framed buildings. This paper reports on the testing of 54 hemp-lime cylinders to compare their strength and stiffness properties at three different densities and at different ages up to 180 days. Three different and widely used formulated lime binders were studied. Phenolphthalein staining was used to map development of the carbonation front across specimen cross-sections. The strength and stiffness properties of the hemp-lime are comparable with other rigid insulation materials such as woodfibre board. The strength of hemp-lime increases with mix density and age. However, the strength of hemp-lime is not directly related to the individual strength of the binder, but rather is a function of complex and dynamic interactions between the hemp and the binder matrix, as well as the density and the percentage of wet binder mix at fabrication.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

BROOKLYN, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bre & Co., founded and created by Bre Pettis, former co-founder and CEO of the 3D printing company MakerBot, is exploring the frontiers of craftspersonship, advanced manufacturing and iterative design to create unique heirloom-quality watches, pens, jewelry and 3D printed ceramics. Available for the holidays are several unique and limited edition Bre & Co. Origami gifts. Bre & Co. Origami Watch | $5,800 Stainless Steel or $8,400 Carbon Fiber Available at bre.co The limited edition Bre & Co. Origami Watch is now available in both 316L stainless steel (available now) and carbon fiber (pre-order for 2017 delivery). Both watches have sapphire crystals and include Eterna 3909A movement and are packaged in oak wood display boxes. On the back of the watch is a an embedded one-half-ounce American eagle liberty gold coin. Lady Liberty on one side and a family of eagles on the other represent strength, courage, camaraderie and compassion. The Bre & Co. Origami Pen combines beauty and functionality in a sleek and geometric design. The bead-blasted stainless steel feels great in the pocket as well as in the hand and allows for a smooth grip and effortless use. The weight of the pen contributes to an overall sensation of solidity and can help the user write more smoothly. The Bre & Co. Origami Pen finds inspiration in the folded paper shapes of super cars of the 1980s, Japanese folded paper, and the triangles that make up modern digital model designs. Made of 316L stainless steel the Bre & Co. Origami Pen is made to last lifetimes and could also be used to break the windows out if the owner is ever in the position of being in a car sinking into water. The pen can be personalized with a three letter laser-engraved monogram above the ergonomic finger rest. The Bre & Co. Origami Teapot is an elegant faceted design that looks delicate enough to truly be folded out of paper and the facets appear diamond-like when held up to the light. This teapot was traditionally slip cast and laboriously finished by hand locally by a Brooklyn ceramic artist, Michiko Shimada. The initial design and model were designed in CAD and then 3D printed by Bre & Co. It is made out of black porcelain and glazed with a food-safe and lead-free clear glaze on the interior, leaving the exterior raw black porcelain. The Bre & Co. Origami Teapot holds 4 cups of liquid. Bre & Co. is exploring the frontiers of craftspersonship, advanced manufacturing, and iterative design to create watches, pens, jewelry and ceramics. Bre & Co.’s mission is to deepen relationships with heirloom-quality gifts. Learn more at bre.co and follow Bre & Co. on medium.com/@bre, facebook.com/breandcompany, twitter.com/bre and instagram.com/breandco.


Matthews S.L.,BRE Ltd. | Matthews S.L.,Joint Convener fib Special Activity Group 7 | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd.
Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting III - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting, ICCRRR 2012 | Year: 2012

Societal and sustainability are drivers which are generally encouraging the extension of the service life of existing buildings. In the UK there are many high rise Large Panel System (LPS) built dwelling blocks, generally constructed in the 1960's, which are expected to remain in service for an extended period. This poses challenges because LPS dwelling blocks in the UK are treated as a special class of building as a result of the collapse in 1968 of one corner of Ronan Point, a 22 storey LPS dwelling block situated in London, following a piped-gas explosion. As these buildings continue to age, and some have now been in service for over 45 years, deterioration processes are expected to affect aspects of their future performance. Owners of LPS dwelling blocks have an ongoing responsibility for the safety of these blocks, which requires their periodic inspection and structural assessment. Historically the guidance used for structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads has been the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Circulars 62-68 and 71-68, produced in 1968 shortly after the Ronan Point incident. These MHLG Circulars, along with other related guidance from that era, were never withdrawn and notionally remain in force today. However, this guidance has become outdated by subsequent developments. The paper outlines an approach to the through-life management of LPS dwelling blocks, together with associated procedures for their structural assessment for accidental loads and actions. This is based upon the outcomes of a programme of work carried out by BRE over an extended period (mid-1990's to 2011) to develop new guidance, which was recently published as BRE Report 511 'Handbook for the structural assessment of large panel system (LPS) dwelling blocks for accidental loading' (Matthews & Reeves 2012). © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.


Rudd R.,Aegis Systems | Craig K.,Signal Sciences | Ganley M.,BRE Ltd
2015 9th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation, EuCAP 2015 | Year: 2015

there is increasing use of thermally-insulating materials in the built environment. The impact of these materials on building penetration loss at radio wavelengths is of importance to system planners. This paper describes measurements recently made in the UK to quantify the impact of such materials at frequencies between 0.1 and 6 GHz, in two buildings of traditional construction. © 2015 EurAAP.


Matthews S.,BRE Ltd | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Forensic Engineering | Year: 2012

This paper deals with an aspect of the enduring implications of the collapse in 1968 of part of Ronan Point, a large panel system (LPS) built dwelling block. While it is commonly recognised that this incident resulted in the introduction of 'disproportionate collapse' as a structural concept and changes to the UK Building Regulations in force at the time, the issues relating to the ongoing management of the remaining population of existing LPS dwelling blocks are perhaps less widely appreciated. There are many high-rise LPS dwelling blocks in the UK that are expected to remain in service for an extended period. Block owners have an ongoing responsibility for their safety, which requires their periodic inspection and structural assessment. The guidance historically used for the assessment of such blocks has become outdated by developments since its publication. This paper summarises a programme of work to develop updated technical evaluation criteria and associated guidance for undertaking structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads. The programme followed the classic forensic engineering process of learning from an unfortunate event to improve engineering practice in the future.


Matthews S.,BRE Ltd. | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd.
Structural Engineer | Year: 2012

There are still hundreds of high-rise large panel system (LPS) dwelling blocks in the UK. These generally contain fl ats, but in some cases the accommodation is in the form of maisonettes or another multi-level arrangement. Block owners have a continual responsibility for their safety, which requires periodic inspection and structural assessment. The UK requirements for this particular class of building stem from the 1968 collapse of the southeast corner of Ronan Point, a 22 storey LPS dwelling block. LPS dwelling blocks are basically gravity structures, as are traditional masonry constructed buildings. Typically they comprise precast reinforced concrete fl oor and roof components spanning onto storey high structural precast (generally plain) concrete wall panels. Vertical loads are carried to the ground through the structural wall panels, which also provide stability against lateral loads. Historically the guidance used for the structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads has been the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Circulars 62/68 and 71/68, which were produced shortly after the Ronan Point incident. MHLG Circulars 62/68 and 71/68 together with various other related guidance from that era, were never withdrawn and notionally remain in force today. However, the guidance has been rendered out-dated by subsequent developments. This paper provides an overview of updated technical evaluation criteria and the associated guidance for undertaking a structural assessment of an LPS dwelling block for accidental loads.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2014

“planBIM” Overview “planBIM” brings together a series of technology innovations under a common solution to support the UK Level 2 BIM strategy. It delivers the digital plan of works for the UK sector for five years whilst building up its international and UK customisation capability. planBIM provides a freely accessible web-based resource that manages the supply and demand of shared structured asset information. “planBIM” builds on existing world class implementations and will be delivered by developers with an international track record. Governance planBIM is administered as part of the BRE charitable trust activities and supervised by buildingSMART UKI whose charters binds it to supporting open, interoperable and inclusive process improvement in the facilities sector. The service is backed by the reputation, neutrality and care for its position in the sector. The selected sub-contracted organisations have an equity stake managed through the collaboration agreements to complement the contractual relationship and ensure a sustainable business model. Standards BRE’s long standing involvement with buildingSMART UKI, buildingSMART International, ISO, CEN and BSI ensures that the service is a fully compliant implementation of standards and best practices. By implementing ISO 16739 (buildingSMART IFC) ISO 12006 part 3 (buildingSMART IFD) and ISO 27645 (buildingSMART IDM/MVD) it supports the process, structure and data of any BIM based process including those advocated by the UK BIM Strategy. Content planBIM holds the relevant UK and international best practice content. The content is in two parts. The dictionary part holds all the relevant processes, roles, objects and properties including industry classifications. The requirements part then groups these to define what properties are expected on what objects for which process stages provided from (or to) which roles. The dictionary part ensures that the interface presents only familiar terms and expressions; the requirements part then captures the formal expectations in these terms. Implementation The implementation is based on technology that is already in use to deliver the buildingSMART Data Dictionary (bsDD), the buildingSMART Data Model (IFC), the buildingSMART Process management (IDM and MVD) and buildingSMART Certification service (IABI). Specifically “planBIM” exploits AEC3’s “Requirements Management Database” as implemented in established European projects.

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