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Garston, United Kingdom

Hirst E.A.J.,University of Bath | Walker P.,University of Bath | Paine K.A.,University of Bath | Yates T.,BRE Ltd.
Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Construction Materials | Year: 2012

Hemp-lime is a sustainable low-carbon composite building material that combines renewably sourced hemp shiv (a coproduct of hemp fibre crop production) with formulated lime-based binders. To date, its primary use has been to form solid external walls in timber-framed buildings. This paper reports on the testing of 54 hemp-lime cylinders to compare their strength and stiffness properties at three different densities and at different ages up to 180 days. Three different and widely used formulated lime binders were studied. Phenolphthalein staining was used to map development of the carbonation front across specimen cross-sections. The strength and stiffness properties of the hemp-lime are comparable with other rigid insulation materials such as woodfibre board. The strength of hemp-lime increases with mix density and age. However, the strength of hemp-lime is not directly related to the individual strength of the binder, but rather is a function of complex and dynamic interactions between the hemp and the binder matrix, as well as the density and the percentage of wet binder mix at fabrication. Source


Rudd R.,Aegis systems | Craig K.,Signal Sciences | Ganley M.,BRE Ltd.
2015 9th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation, EuCAP 2015 | Year: 2015

there is increasing use of thermally-insulating materials in the built environment. The impact of these materials on building penetration loss at radio wavelengths is of importance to system planners. This paper describes measurements recently made in the UK to quantify the impact of such materials at frequencies between 0.1 and 6 GHz, in two buildings of traditional construction. © 2015 EurAAP. Source


Matthews S.L.,BRE Ltd. | Matthews S.L.,Joint Convener fib Special Activity Group 7 | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd.
Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting III - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting, ICCRRR 2012 | Year: 2012

Societal and sustainability are drivers which are generally encouraging the extension of the service life of existing buildings. In the UK there are many high rise Large Panel System (LPS) built dwelling blocks, generally constructed in the 1960's, which are expected to remain in service for an extended period. This poses challenges because LPS dwelling blocks in the UK are treated as a special class of building as a result of the collapse in 1968 of one corner of Ronan Point, a 22 storey LPS dwelling block situated in London, following a piped-gas explosion. As these buildings continue to age, and some have now been in service for over 45 years, deterioration processes are expected to affect aspects of their future performance. Owners of LPS dwelling blocks have an ongoing responsibility for the safety of these blocks, which requires their periodic inspection and structural assessment. Historically the guidance used for structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads has been the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Circulars 62-68 and 71-68, produced in 1968 shortly after the Ronan Point incident. These MHLG Circulars, along with other related guidance from that era, were never withdrawn and notionally remain in force today. However, this guidance has become outdated by subsequent developments. The paper outlines an approach to the through-life management of LPS dwelling blocks, together with associated procedures for their structural assessment for accidental loads and actions. This is based upon the outcomes of a programme of work carried out by BRE over an extended period (mid-1990's to 2011) to develop new guidance, which was recently published as BRE Report 511 'Handbook for the structural assessment of large panel system (LPS) dwelling blocks for accidental loading' (Matthews & Reeves 2012). © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group. Source


Matthews S.,BRE Ltd. | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd.
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Forensic Engineering | Year: 2012

This paper deals with an aspect of the enduring implications of the collapse in 1968 of part of Ronan Point, a large panel system (LPS) built dwelling block. While it is commonly recognised that this incident resulted in the introduction of 'disproportionate collapse' as a structural concept and changes to the UK Building Regulations in force at the time, the issues relating to the ongoing management of the remaining population of existing LPS dwelling blocks are perhaps less widely appreciated. There are many high-rise LPS dwelling blocks in the UK that are expected to remain in service for an extended period. Block owners have an ongoing responsibility for their safety, which requires their periodic inspection and structural assessment. The guidance historically used for the assessment of such blocks has become outdated by developments since its publication. This paper summarises a programme of work to develop updated technical evaluation criteria and associated guidance for undertaking structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads. The programme followed the classic forensic engineering process of learning from an unfortunate event to improve engineering practice in the future. Source


Matthews S.,BRE Ltd. | Reeves B.,BRE Ltd.
Structural Engineer | Year: 2012

There are still hundreds of high-rise large panel system (LPS) dwelling blocks in the UK. These generally contain fl ats, but in some cases the accommodation is in the form of maisonettes or another multi-level arrangement. Block owners have a continual responsibility for their safety, which requires periodic inspection and structural assessment. The UK requirements for this particular class of building stem from the 1968 collapse of the southeast corner of Ronan Point, a 22 storey LPS dwelling block. LPS dwelling blocks are basically gravity structures, as are traditional masonry constructed buildings. Typically they comprise precast reinforced concrete fl oor and roof components spanning onto storey high structural precast (generally plain) concrete wall panels. Vertical loads are carried to the ground through the structural wall panels, which also provide stability against lateral loads. Historically the guidance used for the structural assessment of LPS dwelling blocks for accidental loads has been the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Circulars 62/68 and 71/68, which were produced shortly after the Ronan Point incident. MHLG Circulars 62/68 and 71/68 together with various other related guidance from that era, were never withdrawn and notionally remain in force today. However, the guidance has been rendered out-dated by subsequent developments. This paper provides an overview of updated technical evaluation criteria and the associated guidance for undertaking a structural assessment of an LPS dwelling block for accidental loads. Source

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