Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory

New Orleans, MD, United States

Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory

New Orleans, MD, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Frazier J.L.,Johns Hopkins Neuro Oncology Surgical Outcomes Research Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Johns Hopkins Neuro Oncology Surgical Outcomes Research Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
World Neurosurgery | Year: 2010

Background: Low-grade gliomas have been documented to undergo transformation into high-grade astrocytomas, and the time interval of this transformation has been reported to generally occur within 5 years in about 50% of patients harboring these low-grade lesions. Several studies have investigated the evolution of low-grade gliomas into malignant gliomas by CT and MRI characteristics, but many have not documented the timing of these transformation processes. Case Description: The authors discuss the cases of 2 patients with histopathologically confirmed grade II astrocytomas after craniotomies that underwent rapid evolution into malignant gliomas within 13 weeks. Interestingly, both low-grade astrocytomas were positive with immunostaining for the epidermal growth factor receptor, in which its amplification has been implicated as a molecular marker of malignant gliomas. In addition, the grade II astrocytomas were negative for p53 in both patients but were found to be positive upon transformation into malignant gliomas. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of rapid malignant transformation of lowgrade gliomas, which were proven by histology, within 13 weeks. There may be patients with a subtype of low-grade astrocytomas that may warrant molecular characterization to determine if aggressive adjuvant therapy would be of benefit. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Pendleton C.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Adams H.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Wand G.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Pituitary | Year: 2011

A review of Dr. Cushing's surgical cases at Johns Hopkins Hospital revealed new information about his early operative experience with acromegaly. Although in 1912 Cushing published selective case studies regarding this work, a review of all his operations for acromegaly during his early years has never been reported. We uncovered 37 patients who Cushing treated with surgical intervention directed at the pituitary gland. Of these, nine patients who presented with symptoms of acromegaly, and one with symptoms of gigantism were selected for further review. Two patients underwent transfrontal 'omega incision' approaches, and the remaining eight underwent transsphenoidal approaches. Of the 10 patients, 6 were male. The mean age was 38.0 years. The mean hospital stay was 39.4 days. There was one inpatient death during primary interventions (10%) and three patients were deceased at the time of last follow-up (33%). The mean time to death, calculated from the date of the primary surgical intervention, and including inpatient and outpatient deaths, was 11.3 months. The mean time to last follow-up, calculated from the day of discharge, was 59.3 months. At the time of last follow-up, two patients reported resolution of headache; four patients reported continued visual deficits, and two patients reported ongoing changes in mental status. This review analyzes the outcomes for 10 patients who underwent surgical intervention for acromegaly or gigantism, and offers an explanation for Cushing's transition from the transfrontal "omega incision" to the transsphenoidal approach while practicing at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Capilla-Gonzalez V.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Cebrian-Silla A.,University of Valencia | Guerrero-Cazares H.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Garcia-Verdugo J.M.,University of Valencia | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience | Year: 2013

The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest source of newly generated cells in the adult mammalian brain. SVZ-derived neuroblasts migrate via the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb (OB), where they differentiate into mature neurons. Additionally, a small proportion of SVZ-derived cells contribute to the generation of myelinating oligodendrocytes. The production of new cells in the SVZ decreases during aging, affecting the incorporation of new neurons into the OB. However, the age-related changes that occur across the RMS are not fully understood. In this study we evaluate how aging affects the cellular organization of migrating neuroblast chains, the proliferation, and the fate of the newly generated cells in the SVZ-OB system. By using electron microscopy and immunostaining, we found that the RMS path becomes discontinuous and its cytoarchitecture is disorganized in aged mice (24-month-old mice). Subsequently, OB neurogenesis was impaired in the aged brain while the production of oligodendrocytes was not compromised. These findings provide new insight into oligodendrocyte preservation throughout life. Further exploration of this matter could help the development of new strategies to prevent neurological disorders associated with senescence. © 2013 Capilla-Gonzalez, Cebrian-Silla, Guerrero-Cazares, Garcia-Verdugo and Quinones-Hinojosa.


Capilla-Gonzalez V.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Cebrian-Silla A.,University of Valencia | Guerrero-Cazares H.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Garcia-Verdugo J.M.,University of Valencia | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
GLIA | Year: 2014

Neurogenesis persists in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain. During aging, the SVZ neurogenic capacity undergoes a progressive decline, which is attributed to a decrease in the population of neural stem cells (NSCs). However, the behavior of the NSCs that remain in the aged brain is not fully understood. Here we performed a comparative ultrastructural study of the SVZ niche of 2-month-old and 24-month-old male C57BL/6 mice, focusing on the NSC population. Using thymidine-labeling, we showed that residual NSCs in the aged SVZ divide less frequently than those in young mice. We also provided evidence that ependymal cells are not newly generated during senescence, as others studies suggest. Remarkably, both astrocytes and ependymal cells accumulated a high number of intermediate filaments and dense bodies during aging, resembling reactive cells. A better understanding of the changes occurring in the neurogenic niche during aging will allow us to develop new strategies for fighting neurological disorders linked to senescence. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Pendleton C.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Adams H.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Laws E.R.,Harvard University | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Pituitary | Year: 2010

Although researchers have discovered that Minnie G. had nearly 50 years of progression-free survival, the absence of her original surgical records have precluded anything more than speculation as to the etiology of her symptoms or the details of her admission. Following IRB approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the microfilm surgical records from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896-1912 were reviewed. Using the surgical number provided in Cushing's publications, the record for Minnie G. was recovered for further review. Cushing's diagnosis relied largely on history and physical findings. Minnie G. presented with stigmata associated with classic Cushings Syndrome: abdominal stria, supraclavicular fat pads, and a rounded face. However, she also presented with unusual physical findings: exophthalmos, and irregular pigmentation of the extremities, face, and eyelids. A note in the chart indicates Minnie G. spoke very little English, implying the history-taking was fraught with opportunities for error. Although there remains no definitive etiology for Minnie G.'s symptoms, this report contributes additional information about her diagnosis and treatment. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Latimer K.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Pendleton C.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Martinez A.,Monterrey Institute of Technology | Subramanian P.S.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Archives of Ophthalmology | Year: 2012

Rapid advances in understanding glaucoma occurred following the invention of the ophthalmoscope in the mid-19th century. To our knowledge, attempts by neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing, MD, to cure the condition during his years at Johns Hopkins Hospital have never been previously reported. The Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical records from 1896 through 1912 were reviewed. A case in which Cushing attempted a surgical cure for a patient diagnosed as having glaucoma was selected for review. In 1905, Cushing performed extirpation of the superior cervical ganglion of a patient believed to have chronic glaucoma experiencing an acute episode who had previously underwent bilateral iridectomies. The patient reported stabilization of vision and decreased pain after the procedure. Respected neurosurgeon Cushing undertook surgical treatment of glaucoma at the turn of the 20th century. His approach provides insight into contemporary glaucoma therapies and pathophysiology. ©2012 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Latimer K.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Pendleton C.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Olivi A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Cohen-Gadol A.A.,Indiana University | And 2 more authors.
Archives of Surgery | Year: 2011

The recognition of surgical mishaps and their correction in subsequent cases was critical in the evolution of the discipline of neurosurgery during its infancy. The Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical records from 1896 to 1912 were reviewed, and 30 cases documenting the self-reported surgical errors of Harvey Cushing, MD, were selected for further analysis. We demonstrate that alongside pioneering profound advancements in medical care, Cushing openly acknowledged and described significant instances of human error, mistakes in judgment and technique, and equipment and supply oversights, regardless of whether these events affected patient outcome. Mistakes were analyzed and recorded to be drawn on as lessons to improve future care. This review defines the attitude toward documenting and reporting medical errors present at the founding of the field of neurosurgery as one of forthright acknowledgment in the pursuit of innovation. ©2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Latimer K.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Pendleton C.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Cohen-Gadol A.A.,Indiana University | Gokaslan Z.L.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Archives of Surgery | Year: 2011

Background: A review of the surgical cases of Harvey Cushing, MD, at The Johns Hopkins Hospital provided insight into his early work treating breast cancer metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS). At the time, neurologic surgery was in its infancy. Metastases of breast carcinoma to the CNS were recognized; however, many surgeons of the era adhered to a general principle of not operating in these situations. Methods: The Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical records from 1896 to 1912 were reviewed. Four cases in which Cushing treated patients with a history of breast cancer who were diagnosed as having CNS metastasis were selected for further study. Results: Cushing performed surgery on 4 patients with suspected CNS metastasis in the early 1900s. For a spinal metastasis, Cushing performed a laminectomy and intradural exploratory surgery. His treatments in cerebral cases sought to relieve increased intracranial pressure through decompression. He resected the lesions when they could be located. Conclusions: From the start of his career as a neurosurgeon, Cushing chose to perform surgery on patients with suspected CNS metastasis in an attempt to palliate some of their symptoms. Although his patients did not survive long after the procedures, they did experience temporary relief of symptoms that likely encouraged Cushing's continued operations in such situations and laid the foundation for future therapies for these patients. ©2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Mohyeldin A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Garzon-Muvdi T.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory | Quinones-Hinojosa A.,Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Cell Stem Cell | Year: 2010

The defining hallmark of stem cells is their ability to self-renew and maintain multipotency. This capacity depends on the balance of complex signals in their microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) maintain undifferentiated states of embryonic, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cell phenotypes and also influence proliferation and cell-fate commitment. Recent evidence has identified a broader spectrum of stem cells influenced by hypoxia that includes cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. These findings have important implications on our understanding of development, disease, and tissue-engineering practices and furthermore elucidate an added dimension of stem cell control within the niche. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in cellular neuroscience | Year: 2013

The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest source of newly generated cells in the adult mammalian brain. SVZ-derived neuroblasts migrate via the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb (OB), where they differentiate into mature neurons. Additionally, a small proportion of SVZ-derived cells contribute to the generation of myelinating oligodendrocytes. The production of new cells in the SVZ decreases during aging, affecting the incorporation of new neurons into the OB. However, the age-related changes that occur across the RMS are not fully understood. In this study we evaluate how aging affects the cellular organization of migrating neuroblast chains, the proliferation, and the fate of the newly generated cells in the SVZ-OB system. By using electron microscopy and immunostaining, we found that the RMS path becomes discontinuous and its cytoarchitecture is disorganized in aged mice (24-month-old mice). Subsequently, OB neurogenesis was impaired in the aged brain while the production of oligodendrocytes was not compromised. These findings provide new insight into oligodendrocyte preservation throughout life. Further exploration of this matter could help the development of new strategies to prevent neurological disorders associated with senescence.

Loading Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory collaborators
Loading Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory collaborators