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News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

According to a new market research report "Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market by Assessment Type (Pen-and-Paper Based, Hosted, and Biometrics), Components, Application (Clinical Trial, Screening & Diagnostics, Brain Training, Academic Research), & Region - Global forecast to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market size estimated to grow from USD 962.0 Million in 2016 to USD 4,127.2 Million by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 33.8%. Browse 56 market data Tables and 44 Figures spread through 138 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market" http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/cognitive-assessment-training-healthcare-market-191532711.html Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. The major forces driving this market are aging global population, increasing awareness about brain fitness, and advancements in technology. The growing market for cognitive solutions and increasing demand for brain training by next-generation tech-savvy population are contributing to the growth of the Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market. Clinical trials in terms of application is expected hold the largest market share in the Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market during the forecast period Clinical trials are mainly used to identify, measure, or monitor cognitive impairments and cognitive changes. The assessment of cognitive functions is an integral part of decision making during clinical drug development, as certain drugs can have an impact on the cognitive capabilities of the brain. The market is expected to contribute the highest revenue for vendors offering clinical trials. Service segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR in the Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market and the current trend is expected to continue during the forecast period An Increasing demand for cognitive assessment and training tests and procedures in the global healthcare market also provides a significant scope for associated services as well. The growth of the services segment is expected to accelerate, due to an increasing level of awareness regarding the brain fitness. With the increasing utilization of cognitive assessment and training solutions, the services act as an add-on to these solutions making them more valuable. Providers of cognitive assessment and training solutions and services offer training and coaching services to deliver balanced cognitive rehabilitation solutions. North America is expected to contribute the largest market share and Asia-Pacific (APAC) to grow at the highest rate North America is expected to hold the largest market share and to dominate the Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market from 2016 to 2021, due to the increasing awareness among population about adopting medication for cognitive diseases. The new generation in this region is more concerned towards the benefits of cognitive training, which is not just limited to patients with cognitive dysfunctions. The U.S. market holds a majority of the market share in terms of adoption as well as revenue generation in the North American market, due to the rapidly aging population vulnerable to cognitive diseases in the region. The APAC region is expected to witness the highest growth rate during the forecast period, as the population in the region is more inclined towards adopting a healthier lifestyle. Hence, the concerns regarding cognitive diseases are growing in the region. The major vendors in the Cognitive Assessment and Training in Healthcare Market include Cambridge Cognition Ltd. (Cambridge, U.K.), Cogstate Ltd. (New Haven, U.S.), Bracket (Pennsylvania, U.S.), MedAvante Inc. (New Jersey, U.S.), Quest Diagnostic (New Jersey, U.S.), ProPhase, LLC (New York, U.S.), CogniFit (New York, U.S.), ERT Clinical (Pennsylvania, U.S.), NeuroCog Trials (North Carolina, U.S.), and Brain Resource Company (New South Wales, Australia). Cognitive Computing Market by Technology (Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, Automated Reasoning), by Deployment Model (On-Premises, Cloud) & by Regions - Global Forecast to 2019 http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/cognitive-computing-market-%20136144837.html Cognitive Assessment and Training Market by Assessment Type (Pen & Paper Based, Hosted, Biometrics), Service, Application (Clinical Trials, Classroom Learning, Brain Training, Corporate Learning, Academic Research), Vertical and Region - Global Forecast to 2020 http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/cognitive-assessment-market-1039.html Know More About our Knowledge Store @ http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Knowledgestore.asp MarketsandMarkets is the largest market research firm worldwide in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to a multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. We at MarketsandMarkets are inspired to help our clients grow by providing apt business insight with our huge market intelligence repository. Visit MarketsandMarkets Blog @ http://www.marketsandmarketsblog.com/market-reports/telecom-it Connect with us on LinkedIn @ http://www.linkedin.com/company/marketsandmarkets


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Louis Gagnon recently joined the MyBrainSolutions (MBS) team as CEO. Gagnon has 25 years of experience as a high-growth global digital businesses leader, most notably at Amazon’s subsidiary Audible where he served as Chief Product and Marketing Officer. He also was recently appointed Advisor to TPG Capital following a short CEO assignment to turn around portfolio company Ride.com. Other past notable roles include Chief Product & Marketing Officer at Yodle and Senior VP of Global Products at Monster Worldwide. As the new CEO of MBS and Brain Resource Limited, Gagnon intends to leverage the company’s valuable assets to accelerate momentum of 60% YoY revenue growth. More specifically, the company’s Holistic Brain Assessment/Training tools and its standardized Neuroscientific Database will be used to empower individuals to assess and optimize the core brain processes that power their wellbeing. “I have spent my career focused on creating social change while generating successful shareholder outcomes,” said Gagnon. “Brain Resource is the largest shareholder value creation opportunity that I have been associated with and it also is the largest social change opportunity. I am very humbled and grateful for the work that has led us here and I cannot be more excited to build the team and execute the strategy that will take this great work to the next level.” Added MBS Chairman and co-founder Dr. Evian Gordon, “Louis is an extremely well-credentialed leader of high-growth technology-based companies who has a significant personal interest in brain performance. He has extensive relationships across the technology and investment community and provides shareholders with a proven track record of establishing market adoption and repeat purchase of innovative products in high frequency.” Another new addition, Emil Vasilev, comes to MBS with well-rounded experiences across the technology, private equity and investment banking arenas. Having worked as an investment banker at Barclays Capital and investor at Corsair Capital, Vasilev brings in-depth knowledge of finance, capital raising, transaction execution and strategy. He also has hands-on experience overseeing the finance and operations functions at Ride, a portfolio company of TPG Growth. Vasilev has expressed enthusiasm to align with MBS at a time when the importance of a holistic approach to the brain, corporate and personal well-being is becoming the norm among corporates and business leaders around the world. “I am excited to join MBS and help execute the new plan for the company while leveraging its existing marquee assets,” concluded Vasilev. “Their scientific foundation and blue-chip client base are testament to the significant opportunity for shareholder and social value-creation.” Vasilev is an eager practitioner of mindfulness meditation and holistic brain practices and volunteers as a teacher of stress management techniques and meditation. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Amherst College. About MyBrainSolutions [parent company Brain Resource Ltd (ASX: BRC)] MyBrainSolutions is an online integrated self-empowerment platform to assess the brain and provide engaging digital health tools to train new habits and improve brain health. The platform is the first to bring together a brain-based assessment with tools to reduce stress and improve cognitive and emotional functions for employees and customers using scalable, confidential and cost-effective methods. MyBrainSolutions is owned by a subsidiary of Brain Resource Limited, which is also commercializing iSPOT products powered by the largest standardized and integrated database on the brain. For more information, please visit http://www.mybrainsolutions.com. About the NALA™ The NALA offers small and medium-sized businesses effective ways to reach customers through new media. As a single-agency source, the NALA helps businesses flourish in their local community. The NALA's mission is to promote a business' relevant and newsworthy events and achievements, both online and through traditional media. For media inquiries, please call 805.650.6121, ext. 361.


Grieve S.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,Royal Prince Alfred Hospital | Grieve S.M.,Brain Resource | Korgaonkar M.S.,University of Sydney | And 3 more authors.
NeuroImage | Year: 2011

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of structural brain development have suggested that the limbic system is relatively preserved in comparison to other brain regions with healthy aging. The goal of this study was to systematically investigate age-related changes of the limbic system using measures of cortical thickness, volumetric and diffusion characteristics. We also investigated if the "relative preservation" concept is consistent across the individual sub-regions of the limbic system. T1 weighted structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging data from 476 healthy participants from the Brain Resource International Database was used for this study. Age-related changes in grey matter (GM)/white matter (WM) volume, cortical thickness, diffusional characteristics for the pericortical WM and for the fiber tracts associated with the limbic regions were quantified. A regional variability in the aging patterns across the limbic system was present. Four important patterns of age-related changes were highlighted for the limbic sub-regions: 1. early maturation of GM with late loss in the hippocampus and amygdala; 2. an extreme pattern of GM preservation in the entorhinal cortex; 3. a flat pattern of reduced GM loss in the anterior cingulate and the parahippocampus and; 4. accelerated GM loss in the isthmus and posterior cingulate. The GM volumetric data and cortical thickness measures proved to be internally consistent, while the diffusional measures provided complementary data that seem consistent with the GM trends identified. This heterogeneity can be hypothesized to be associated with age-related changes of cognitive function specialized for that region and direct connections to the other brain regions sub-serving these functions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Korgaonkar M.S.,University of Sydney | Cooper N.J.,Brain Resource | Williams L.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,Brain Resource
NeuroReport | Year: 2012

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be used to study the organization of brain white matter noninvasively. The aim of this study was to present a proof of concept for integrating DTI with high-resolution anatomical (T1) images to map and assess inter-regional connectivity across the entire cortex in a cohort of healthy participants and compared with patients with major depressive disorder. We used MRI data of 23 patients and 23 matched controls, assessed as part of baseline testing in the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D). Freesurfer was used to analyze the T1 images to automatically label 35 gyral-based areas for each hemisphere. DTI tractography was performed to parcellate intercortical tracts using each of these areas in seed-target combinations. We quantified fractional anisotropy, number-of-fiber connections, and fiber path length for each DTI connection, with the goal of identifying the best measure or combination of measures to characterize major depression. The best classification accuracy for the individual measures was achieved using the number-of-fibers data, whereas the combination model provided a slight improvement. The most discriminant features between the two groups were for white matter associated with the limbic, frontal, and thalamic projection fibers and as part of cortical connections between the left inferior temporal and the postcentral cortex; the left parstriangularis and the left superior frontal; the left cuneus and the corpus callosum; the left lingual and the right lateral occipital, the right superior parietal and the right superior temporal cortices; and the right inferior parietal and the right insula and postcentral cortices. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.


Williams L.M.,University of Sydney | Gatt J.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,Brain Resource | And 5 more authors.
NeuroImage | Year: 2010

Biases toward processing negative versus positive information vary as a function of level of awareness, and are modulated by monoamines. Excessive biases are associated with individual differences in mood and emotional stability, and emotional disorder. Here, we examined the impact of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val108/158Met polymorphism, involved in dopamine and norepinephrine catabolism, on both emotional brain function and self-reported negativity bias. COMT genotyping and self-reported level of negativity bias were completed for 46 healthy participants taking part in the Brain Resource International Database. Functional MRI was undertaken during perception of facial expressions of fear and happiness presented under unmasked (consciously identified) and masked (to prevent conscious detection) conditions. Structural MR images were also acquired. A greater number of COMT Met alleles predicted increased activation in brainstem, amygdala, basal ganglia and medial prefrontal regions for conscious fear, but decreased activation for conscious happiness. This pattern was also apparent for brainstem activation for the masked condition. Effects were most apparent for females. These differences could not be explained by gray matter variations. The Met-related profile of activation, particularly prefrontally, predicted greater negativity bias associated with risk for emotional disorder. The findings suggest that the COMT Met allele modulates neural substrates of negative versus positive emotion processing. This effect may contribute to negativity biases, which confer susceptibility for emotional disorders. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Gatt J.M.,University of Sydney | Nemeroff C.B.,University of Miami | Schofield P.R.,University of New South Wales | Paul R.H.,University of Missouri-St. Louis | And 4 more authors.
Biological Psychiatry | Year: 2010

Background Depression will be the second largest burden of disease by 2020. Developing new tools for identifying risk and ultimately prevention of depression relies on elucidating the integrative relationships between susceptibility markers from gene-stress interactions and how they impact emotional brain and arousal systems. They have largely been studied in isolation. Methods We examined how genetic (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] valine 66 to methionine [Val66Met] and serotonin receptor gene 3A [HTR3A]) and early life stress susceptibility factors interact in predicting electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, emotion-elicited heart rate, and self-reported negativity bias, each correlates of risk for depression. Caucasian volunteers (n = 363) were derived from the Brain Resource International Database, via the Brain Research And Integrative Neuroscience Network. Results Individuals with both BDNF methionine and HTR3A CC risk genotypes and early life stressors demonstrated a profile of elevated emotion-elicited heart rate and right frontal hyper-activation with right parietotemporal hypoactivation in EEG asymmetry. Elevations in heart rate were a moderator of negativity bias. Conclusions The findings provide new evidence that these gene-stress susceptibility factors contribute to a brain-arousal profile indicative of risk for depression. They are a step toward identifying biological markers for detecting risk before overt symptoms. It would be valuable for future studies to examine comorbidity and specificity issues; for instance, whether these gene-stress factors contribute in different ways to the partially distinct EEG asymmetry profiles found with anxiety. © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry.


Korgaonkar M.S.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,University of Sydney | Grieve S.M.,Brain Resource | Etkin A.,Stanford University | And 5 more authors.
Neuropsychopharmacology | Year: 2013

Functional neuroimaging studies have implicated dysregulation of prefrontal circuits in major depressive disorder (MDD), and these circuits are a viable target for predicting treatment outcomes. However, because of the heterogeneity of tasks and samples used in studies to date, it is unclear whether the central dysfunction is one of prefrontal hyperreactivity or hyporeactivity. We used a standardized battery of tasks and protocols for functional magnetic resonance imaging, to identify the common vs the specific prefrontal circuits engaged by these tasks in the same 30 outpatients with MDD compared with 30 matched, healthy control participants, recruited as part of the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D). Reflecting cognitive neuroscience theory and established evidence, the battery included cognitive tasks designed to assess functions of selective attention, sustained attention-working memory and response inhibition, and emotion tasks to assess explicit conscious and implicit nonconscious viewing of facial emotion. MDD participants were distinguished by a distinctive biosignature of: hypoactivation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during working memory updating and during conscious negative emotion processing; hyperactivation of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during working memory and response inhibition cognitive tasks and hypoactivation of the dorsomedial prefrontal during conscious processing of positive emotion. These results show that the use of standardized tasks in the same participants provides a way to tease out prefrontal circuitry dysfunction related to cognitive and emotional functions, and not to methodological or sample variations. These findings provide the frame of reference for identifying prefrontal biomarker predictors of treatment outcomes in MDD. © 2013 American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. All rights reserved.


Benes F.M.,Brain Resource | Benes F.M.,Harvard University
Schizophrenia Research | Year: 2015

Postmortem studies have suggested that there is abnormal GABAergic activity in the hippocampus in schizophrenia (SZ). In micro-dissected human hippocampal slices, a loss of interneurons and a compensatory upregulation of GABAA receptor binding activity on interneurons, but not PNs, has suggested that disinhibitory GABA-to-GABA connections are abnormal in stratum oriens (SO) of CA3/2, but not CA1, in schizophrenia. Abnormal expression changes in the expression of kainate receptor (KAR) subunits 5, 6 and 7, as well as an inwardly-rectifying hyperpolarization-activated cationic channel (Ih3; HCN3) may play important roles in regulating GABA cell activity at the SO CA3/2 locus. The exclusive neurons at this site are GABAergic interneurons; these cells also receive direct projections from the basolateral amygdala (BLA). When the BLA is stimulated by stereotaxic infusion of picrotoxin in rats, KARs influence axodendritic and presynaptic inhibitory mechanisms that regulate both inhibitory and disinhibitory interneurons in the SO-CA3/2 locus. The rat model described here was specifically developed to extend our understanding of these and other postmortem findings and has suggested that GABAergic abnormalities and possible disturbances in oscillatory rhythms may be related to a dysfunction of disinhibitory interneurons at the SO-CA3/2 site of schizophrenics. © 2015 .


Hawley L.A.,Brain Resource
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation | Year: 2016

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in long-term injury-related disabilities. Individuals with TBI and their families must often advocate for themselves to secure resources to address their postinjury needs. However, the ability to advocate may be compromised by the effects of the injury. The Self-Advocacy for Independent Life (SAIL) program aims to empower individuals and families with the skills of self-advocacy so they can navigate life after brain injury in a self-efficacious manner. 2016 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC


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