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Brisbane, Australia

Brady S.,Brady Heywood
Structural Engineer | Year: 2014

Sean Brady highlighted the systemic management failings that resulted in huge financial cost and significant reputational damage to a high profile project during the Montreal Olympics Games in Montreal in 1976. The project was considered as an example of poor planning, poor project management, fraudulent practice and corruption, and served as a warning of the dangers of architectural and financial free-rein combined with political ambition and immovable deadlines. Mayor Drapeau and architect Roger Taillibert were responsible for failing to manage the project efficiently. Mayor Drapeau scrapped the original plans and selected architect Roger Taillibert, without competition to deliver the games. Delays and cost overruns continued, with many caused through waiting for Taillibert to finish the plans, while labor issues began to adversely affect the site. Source


Brady S.P.,Brady Heywood
Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities | Year: 2012

The role of the forensic process in investigating structural failure is discussed. Forensic engineers utilize a range of expertise to investigate structural failure. The role of this process in the design of new structures is self evident, but the process has a number of important roles to play in the overall response to structural failure. The key to determining structural causation is the application of the forensic process, which aims to objectively identify the technical cause or causes of failure by using available evidence. The forensic process of collecting evidence, developing failure hypotheses, testing each hypothesis against the collected evidence, and determining the most common cause of failure, is a process of analysis, rather than synthesis. The accurate determination of causation will be very difficult unless the design engineer is able to put aside the traditional design process and apply a forensic process. Source


Brady S.,Brady Heywood
Structural Engineer | Year: 2014

Sean Brady shared his views on the events that resulted in the collapse of the Quebec Bridge in Canada in 1907, killing 75 people. The Quebec Bridge was one of the world's most ambitious bridge engineering projects. The collapse of the bridge and casualties resulted in significant changes being introduced within the construction industry and the formation of the American Institute of Steel Construction and the American Association of State Highway Officials to address such issues in the future. Investigations conducted into the cause of the collapse revealed that the Phoenix Bridge Company had carried out the self-weight calculations for the final design based on the initial proposed length of 488m and had not updated its self-weight calculations for the revised length. Source


Brady S.,Brady Heywood
Structural Engineer | Year: 2014

Sean Brady explores the role that implicit assumptions play in undermining experts' judgment. Sean Brady states that it is necessary to examine how experts think and use their expertise to understand the challenges faced by them in conservation work. He explores the model detailed by Dane to achieve these objectives, while many conceptualizations of expertise exist. Dane explains the nature of expertise by comparing a novice's expertise with that of an expert. A novice's expertise comprises schema, attributes and linkages. The expert's expertise contains more knowledge than the novice's with more attributes. Source


Brady S.,Brady Heywood
Structural Engineer | Year: 2014

Sean Brady assesses the strengths and weaknesses of applying engineering analysis to the forensic process. The objective of the forensic process is to identify the cause of engineering failure in a forensically effective manner. It relies on an engineer's forensic expertise and experience as it is a process of analysis. The forensic process is characterized by evidence collection, the development of a wide range of failure hypotheses, and the testing of these hypotheses against the collected evidence simplifying performance assumptions. Sean Brady examines two practical issues that can manifest relating to evidence collection and engineering analysis and discusses how an engineer with a predominantly design background can avoid these issues and develop their forensic capability. He states that a focus on analysis at a very early stage in the investigation can prove a major distraction from the main task of evidence collection. Source

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