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News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report studies ICT and Smart Grid in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Aclara  Alcatel-Lucent  Aeris  Analog Devices  AT&T/SmartSynch  BPL Global  Carlson Wireless  Current Group  Cisco  Cooper Power Systems  Elster  Echelon  Emeter  GE  Google  GreenBox  GridPoint  Grid Net  Infotility  Itron  Oracle  Landis+Gyr  Sensus Metering Systems  SmartSynch  Silver Spring Networks  Siemens  Spinwave  Tantalus  Tendril  TransData Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of ICT and Smart Grid in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America  Europe  China  Japan  Southeast Asia  India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Type I  Type II  Type III Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of ICT and Smart Grid in each application, can be divided into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 Global ICT and Smart Grid Market Research Report 2016  1 ICT and Smart Grid Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of ICT and Smart Grid  1.2 ICT and Smart Grid Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of ICT and Smart Grid by Type in 2015  1.2.2 Type I  1.2.3 Type II  1.2.4 Type III  1.3 ICT and Smart Grid Segment by Application  1.3.1 ICT and Smart Grid Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Application 1  1.3.3 Application 2  1.3.4 Application 3  1.4 ICT and Smart Grid Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of ICT and Smart Grid (2011-2021) 7 Global ICT and Smart Grid Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis  7.1 Aclara  7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.1.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.1.2.1 Type I  7.1.2.2 Type II  7.1.3 Aclara ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.2 Alcatel-Lucent  7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.2.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.2.2.1 Type I  7.2.2.2 Type II  7.2.3 Alcatel-Lucent ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.3 Aeris  7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.3.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.3.2.1 Type I  7.3.2.2 Type II  7.3.3 Aeris ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.4 Analog Devices  7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.4.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.4.2.1 Type I  7.4.2.2 Type II  7.4.3 Analog Devices ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.5 AT&T/SmartSynch  7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.5.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.5.2.1 Type I  7.5.2.2 Type II  7.5.3 AT&T/SmartSynch ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.6 BPL Global  7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.6.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.6.2.1 Type I  7.6.2.2 Type II  7.6.3 BPL Global ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.7 Carlson Wireless  7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.7.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.7.2.1 Type I  7.7.2.2 Type II  7.7.3 Carlson Wireless ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.8 Current Group  7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.8.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.8.2.1 Type I  7.8.2.2 Type II  7.8.3 Current Group ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.9 Cisco  7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.9.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.9.2.1 Type I  7.9.2.2 Type II  7.9.3 Cisco ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.10 Cooper Power Systems  7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.10.2 ICT and Smart Grid Product Type, Application and Specification  7.10.2.1 Type I  7.10.2.2 Type II  7.10.3 Cooper Power Systems ICT and Smart Grid Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.11 Elster  7.12 Echelon  7.13 Emeter  7.14 GE  7.15 Google  7.16 GreenBox  7.17 GridPoint  7.18 Grid Net  7.19 Infotility  7.20 Itron  7.21 Oracle  7.22 Landis+Gyr  7.23 Sensus Metering Systems  7.24 SmartSynch  7.25 Silver Spring Networks  7.26 Siemens  7.27 Spinwave  7.28 Tantalus  7.29 Tendril  7.30 TransData


Hinshaw J.V.,BPL Global
LCGC North America | Year: 2011

Headspace sampling for gas chromatography (HSGC) prevents nonvolatile residue accumulation in the inlet and column entrance while simplifying sample preparation. This installment of "GC Connections" addresses some of the details of static HSGC theory and practice for conventional liquid-phase headspace samples, with the goal of better understanding and controlling the analytical process.


News Article | October 8, 2007
Site: www.zdnet.com

Green tech company BPL Global brings a new twist to the term “remote control.” The Pittsburgh-based startup is behind a pilot program in California called Easy Green that aims to cut energy consumption through the use of sensor technology installed in homes. In partnership with the South San Joaquin Irrigation District, BPL Global is working to install its sensors on thermostats in roughly 1,700 households, according to CEO Keith Schaefer. The sensors monitor average household temperatures, especially during the summer months, and are programmed to communicate with a home’s central air-conditioning system through wireless communications when temperatures fall below one of two predesignated levels (either 78 or 84 degrees). When these levels are reached, the air-conditioning is programmed to switch off. The shutoff, in turn, is communicated with load management systems at the power company. The theory is that by turning off these systems, keeping them from overcooling houses (especially during the middle of the day when many homes are empty), the area can avert blackouts and divert electricity to areas where it is needed most (such as larger commercial complexes). The installation is free to the residential customers, who potentially can earn credits of $300 to $600 per summer season, according to Schaefer. The irrigation district is paying for the systems by selling the unused energy back to PG&E. “This is all transparent to the individual customer,” he says. Schaefer says about 40 percent of households in the South San Joaquin district that have been approached about the project are opting to have the sensors installed. To date, the company has signed up about 1,000 homes. In fact, BPL Global found itself with an installation backlog when the test was started, he says. BPL Global targeted California as one of its first test beds because the state has passed laws limiting the construction of more utility plants. In other words: Demand is going up, but capacity isn't going to do the same. Beyond California, BPL Global's aspirations are global, and more cities are targeted for pilots in the fourth quarter. Schaefer says the company is setting up additional tests in regions including Greece, Kuwait and Thailand.


News Article | October 9, 2008
Site: gigaom.com

The Seattle Steam Co. broke ground this week on a new district heating plant, which will burn waste wood from construction and demolition debris, along with natural gas, to create steam. The plant will replace the existing natural-gas fired system, which serves approximately 9 million square feet in the city’s central business district, according to the Seattle Times. District energy projects, which generate steam or hot water in a central facility and pipe it to a network of nearby buildings where it is used for central space and/or water heating, are nothing new. Seattle Steam’s existing system has been operating since 1894 and the industry’s trade association will celebrate it’s centennial anniversary next year. But the technology is heating up across North America, as cities recognize its potential to reduce their carbon footprints. District energy projects eliminate the need for multiple on-site boilers, improving cities’ overall energy efficiency and helping utilities manage more effective district-wide demand response activity. They can also use diverse technologies and feedstocks, since the distribution system is independent of the generation. That means projects can evolve as new, greener feedstocks emerge. Seattle Steam’s existing district heating system was previously fed by burning natural gas and, before that, coal. Adding wood-waste to the equation cuts carbon emissions from the project by capturing an otherwise landfill-bound waste stream. In Vancouver, British Columbia, an innovative project will capture waste heat from raw sewage to meet 70 percent of the space heating and hot water needs of the über-green city’s Olympic Village and Southeast False Creek development, according to the International District Energy Association’s third-quarter 2008 publication. The “neighborhood energy utility” approach will also allow the system to take advantage of other thermal energy resources in the district — including rooftop solar thermal — using net-metering policies that have supported the growth of residential solar photovoltaic systems. Tom Osdoba, manager of the City of Portland’s sustainable economic development initiatives, told Earth2Tech at our West Coast Green afterparty that Portland’s Office of Sustainable Development is investigating a large-scale investment in district heating beyond the dense central city, although first steps are likely to be taken in such a region. The city is looking into raising funds for its program through a combination of private investors and voter-approved bonds, but Osdoba said there’s lots of research, legwork and vetting to be done before the city is ready to move forward with such a plan. While Portland’s effort would top most U.S. projects in size, funding will be a critical element. Rafael Coven, managing partner of Cleantech Indices LLC, says district energy investment is mostly driven by project finance needs, not technology development, meaning private equity firms, not venture capital, are likely to lead growth in the space. Still, technology will play a role, and as district heating and power gains popularity, the big winners, Coven says, are likely to be well-capitalized component manufacturers, like Cummins, GE, Caterpillar and Danfoss. He cautions that startups such as Capstone, which have aimed to enter the market with microturbine products, would need to raise a significant amount of capital in order to become competitive; in the existing economic climate, he says that seems unlikely. Startups aiming to provide integration services, such as software and system-wide services for managing delivery and reliability of energy distribution throughout a district, may have better luck in the market. Coven pointed to the example of Connected Energy, which was acquired by smart-grid firm BPL Global earlier this year.


Dedicated to structured trade and commodity finance in Asia, the summit promises insightful case studies, panel discussions and success stories. Setting the tone of the vital summit is a Keynote Speech on 'Financing challenges for international traders: how can structures provide the answer?' by John MacNamara, Global Head of Structured Trade Finance, Deutsche Bank AG. Next is a session highlighting the ‘Challenges in SCTF in China’ by Frank Wu, Regional Head of Structured Commodity Trade Finance, Asia Pacific, Deutsche Bank AG. An exclusive STCF Panel discussing the trends in Asia STCF will be led by Momchil Ivanov, Head of Structured Metal and Energy Finance – Asia, ING Bank; Caspar Jonk, Head of Trade South and South-East Asia, National Australia Bank; Peter Hopkins, Managing Director, DRUM and Aashish Pitale, Group Treasurer, Essar Group. Another Panel Discussion on ‘How is Asia shaping up in the competition for Africa's development challenges’ that will assess the trade finance needs for continuing transformation in Africa will be chaired by Dan Day-Robinson, Managing Director, GT Group Switzerland with Lamon Rutten, Manager, Policies, Markets and ICT programme, CTA; Dr. Benedict Oremah, Executive Vice-President, Business Development & Corporate Banking at African Export-Import Bank (Afreximbank) and Kristian Schach Møller, CEO, ACE – Agricultural Commodity Exchange for Africa as panelists. ‘Legal issues in STCF in Asia’, especially pertaining to structuring and documenting transactions will be spelt out by Geoffrey Wynne, Partner, Sullivan & Worcester UK LLP while the ‘Challenges in Private Insurance Market in Asia’ will be illustrated by Peter Gilbert, CEO, BPL Global Hong Kong. In a separate paper, Aashish Pitale, Group Treasurer, Essar Group will share a multinational conglomerate’s perspective on ‘What are the trends in commodity finance which lend themselves to new or existing structures from a risk management perspective’. Also packed into the agenda are sessions on ‘Structures to improve capital efficiency’ by Scobie Mackay, Head, Commodity Traders & Agribusiness, Transaction Banking, Standard Chartered Bank Asia Ltd and ‘Structuring commodity finance with Brazilian suppliers’ by Lúcio Feijó Lopes,Partner, Feijó Lopes Advogados. The highly specialised Asia STCF 2015 has added a half day workshop on ‘Structuring and Documenting different types of Structured Trade and Commodity Finance Transactions’. The workshop dated 1 July 2015 will be conducted by Geoffrey Wynne, Partner, Sullivan and Worcester LLP, London and Scobie Mackay, Head, Commodity Traders & Agribusiness, Transaction Banking, Standard Chartered Bank Singapore. View Asia STCF 2015 for more information or contact Ms. Grace at +65 6346 8147.


News Article | January 25, 2008
Site: gigaom.com

Broadband over power lines (BPL) came roaring into view, backed by lots of venture money, in 2004 after the FCC pushed the approach as a viable competitor to cable and DSL. But the idea of getting broadband by plugging a modem into your electrical outlet never made it into the mainstream, and the allure of BPL for home broadband has languished. But BPL players now see another market: utilities trying to manage electricity demand. The BPL industry has mostly switched from pushing broadband to providing demand response systems to electric utilities. The head of corporate planning at Con Edison in New York once told me that BPL was a boon for the utility because it allowed the company to know when problems in the grid occurred, sometimes before they caused outages. Prior to BPL, the system’s only feedback came in the form of angry phone calls from customers. But even as late as 2006, a study by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission estimated that just 6 percent of electric meters were enabled to provide real-time, two-way communication capabilities. Thanks to stresses on the electric grid and a demand for more power, utility operators are clamoring for demand-response, or smart grid technologies, and the former BPL guys are happy to oblige. Companies such as Current Communications, Telkonet and BPL Global have revamped their web sites to reflect their new focus. Already this month, BPL has purchased two companies to broaden its demand response capabilities. But just as it did in the home networking environment, BPL is once again competing against Wi-Fi. The power industry may prefer a Wi-Fi network because of its ability to continue transmitting information during a power outage. In Texas, Current is still rolling out new smart grid deployments that seem to perform as advertised, while the City of Burbank in Calif. went with Wi-Fi. So far, the switch to green tech has served BPL well, but it may end up fighting the same market adoption battles as it did in the home.


News Article | March 18, 2008
Site: gigaom.com

The Department of Energy and venture capital firms have something in common — they’re both looking for entrepreneurs to help commercialize early stage clean technology. And last month Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner named three venture capital firms that were selected to participate in a new Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) program in association with the Department of Energy. We got a chance to chat with one of those firms’ new EIRs: Foundation Capital’s Michael Bauer, who will soon be headed off to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennesee, where he will try to help move clean technologies out of the lab and onto the market. He’s looking forward to it and thinks, “Being in all these labs will be like being a kid in a candy store.” E2T: What in your background will help you in the EIR program? MB: I did my masters degree in theoretical physics before doing an MBA. At BPL Global I’ve been really focused on the smart grid and demand response applications. E2T: What do you expect your daily life to be like at Oak Ridge? MB: I’m actually expecting a lot of travel. What I want to do is connect with the scientists and understand the technologies that are eligible for licensing and commercialization in the renewable energy space and understand in detail how they work. At the same time I think it’s really important to connect potential customers with these technologies. E2T: What sorts of technologies are you looking for? MB: We’re really going into this with a pretty open mind. We’re going into the largest lab in the national lab system, and they have lots of work going on. They have lots of efficiency and renewable energy work going on but they also have great materials science research going on too. In terms of specific technologies, Foundation has lots of energy efficiency investments so we’ll be looking for anything that could help that portfolio. On the renewables front we really need to see what’s there and complete a discovery mission at the lab before focusing on a specific area. E2T: How long do you think it will take you to find a technology you want to build a business around? MB: The program runs for 12 months. In the best-case scenario I will identify a technology in 6 months or maybe less. The counter to that is I want to give myself time to identify the most promising technology. It may take longer. If I finish early, Foundation would be able to send another entrepreneur to finish Foundation’s term at the lab. E2T:Once you find a technology at Oak Ridge, what will be your next step? MB: Writing a skeleton business plan around it and talking with customers and analyzing the competitive elements around it to understand how to build the company. Then I’ll have to know what sorts of human resources I need to build the company. All of these steps are necessary to convince me that what I have is something that can be turned into a company. Once I have all this in place, it should be fundable and then I can hire those people and build the company. E2T: What exactly are the financial commitments of the DOE and Foundation Capital? MB: The DOE will fund each EIR for $100,000 each year. I’ll be in constant contact with Foundation’s cleantech team and use them as a sounding board. There’s no commitment in either direction but given Foundation’s track record I’d be extremely happy if Foundation did invest in the company I want to spin out of this and I think there’s a strong feeling from Foundation that they want to invest as well. E2T: What do you see as the biggest advantage of the EIR program? MB: One of the great advantages of this approach is I come in and I have a portfolio of candidate technologies based on years of science. VCs want technologies with an unfair advantage. Here these technologies have a moat around them and I’m on the inside.


A gas monitoring apparatus and system that provides for reliable and accurate monitoring of gaseous hydrogen and other compounds in dielectric oil. The apparatus provides an environment for and is used in conjunction with metal oxide semiconductor sensors. Thermal conditioning zones for oil provide an environment in which variations in oil temperature and ambient temperature are eliminated to insure that analytical data are not affected by these environmental conditions.


A gas monitoring apparatus and system that provides for reliable and accurate monitoring of gaseous hydrogen and other compounds in dielectric oil. The apparatus provides an environment for and is used in conjunction with metal oxide semiconductor sensors. Apparatus for creating a fluid-tight environment for the metal oxide semiconductor and a heating manifold are detailed.


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