Bournemouth, United Kingdom

Bournemouth University

www.bournemouth.ac.uk
Bournemouth, United Kingdom

Bournemouth University is a university in and around the large south coast town of Bournemouth, UK . Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.12M | Year: 2017

The manufacturing industry is entering a new era in which new ICT technologies and collaboration applications are integrated with traditional manufacturing practices and processes, which brings virtual organisations to factories, i.e. Manufacturing 2.0. Virtual factory to future manufacturing slows the flexible amalgamation of manufacturing resources in multiple organisations to create timely, demand driven product lines. The project vF Interoperation suppoRting buSiness innovaTion (FIRST) provides the new technology and methodology to describe manufacturing assets; to compose and integrate the existing services into collaborative virtual manufacturing processes; and to deal with evolution of changes. From the overarching objective to enhance manufacturing integration through the application of advanced IT solutions, the innovative project brings together an experienced researcher with expertise in the designing an interoperability framework for facilitating interoperability on data/information, services and process levels respectively. These outcomes lead to significant business innovations for virtual factories, made possible by an internationally recognised group expertise in (manufacturing) services/assets description languages, semantic services discover methods, and automated interoperability. The experienced researcher has an existing background in service oriented business process management; ontology based process model registration and management; and web service discovery and selection. She combines this with a perspective on application of those technologies. The FIRST project will take advantage of this complementary experience as well as the academic and industrial relationships in Europe and China respectively, taking advantage of the unique opportunity to address the concept from both perspectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 445.50K | Year: 2017

Effective collaboration between mental health (MHS) and correctional services (CS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. Service leaders have indicated a need for more effective models of collaboration. Researchers have identified the Change Laboratory Model (CLM) of workplace transformation as a more effective means of supporting interagency collaborative practice than current integration tools. It provides a way to optimise the effectiveness of mental healthcare provision to offenders through a model that fosters innovation and collaborative processes. However, the change laboratory, highly successful internationally and in other clinical contexts, is a new idea in prison development, none as yet being applied to the challenges facing the MHS and CS. The wickedness, complexity and unpredictability of challenges facing interagency working in these secure environments means that piloting the CLM is premature and it must first be adapted to the MHS/CS context. The aim of this study is to validate the change laboratory model ready for implementation in practice. This RISE application builds a community of practice that enriches international research capacity and cooperation to achieve this aim. It brings academic knowledge of the Change Laboratory model to the market of interagency practices between mental health and correctional services for the development of innovation and the advancement of integrated service provision to mentally ill offenders. Knowledge exchange takes place through secondments, interactive workshops, the development of workforce training programmes, study tours, shadowing opportunities and ethnographic research. Through this knowledge exchange, the consortium delivers a user-informed prototype of change laboratory model ready for implementation in the MHS and CS field. This validated change laboratory model, offers the ERA a clear strategy with which to promote integrated care for mentally ill offenders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 2.43M | Year: 2017

Our society in Europe is still under prepared for the demographic changing situation of an ageing population which began several decades ago. This is visible in the age structure of the population and is reflected by the fact that the population aged 65 years and over is increasing in every European country. The growth in the elderly population may be explained by increased longevity, but at the same time, we also see an increase in debilitating conditions. However, it is also clear that the elderly are afflicted by challenging health conditions as a direct consequence of being elderly which impact their quality of life (QOL), e.g. living alone, depression, recovery from illness, immobility. This is what we would like to address. Living longer should be a privilege but there has been a collective failure to address social implications and QOL issues, where social care and the way it is funded are already in crisis. Our aim in this project is to couple the need for new societal approaches in addressing this changing demographic with improving the economy of green microenvironment sites, where health tourism and creating new jobs in this sector would in turn fund and provide benefits with respect to the well-being of the elderly. The ultimate outcome, through this pan-European academic and industrial project, will be: a) to derive cross-disciplinary and inter-sectorial knowledge of how to improve physical and mental well-being in the elderly, b) to characterise the environmental geology of Nemi and to correlate the identified features with improvements in health, well-being and recovery, c) to train a new generation of specialists in the sector of recreation and health for the tourism industry, d) the training of specialists in social and therapeutic horticulture (STH) as a way to improve physical and mental health, e) to create a model for health tourism, and f) to produce a business plan with an economic impact analysis.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-16-2015 | Award Amount: 3.16M | Year: 2015

PROTEUS mission is to investigate and develop ready-to-use scalable online machine learning algorithms and interactive visualization techniques for real-time predictive analytics to deal with extremely large data sets and data streams. The developed algorithms and techniques will form a library to be integrated into an enhanced version of Apache Flink, the EU Big Data platform. PROTEUS will contribute to the EU Big Data area by addressing fundamental challenges related to the scalability and responsiveness of analytics capabilities. The requirements are defined by a steelmaking industrial use case. The techniques developed in PROTEUS are however, general, flexible and portable to all data stream-based domains. In particular, the project will go beyond the current state-of-art technology by making the following specific original contributions: i) Real-time scalable machine learning for massive, high-velocity and complex data streams analytics; ii) Real-time hybrid computation, batch data and data streams; iii) Real-time interactive visual analytics for Big Data; iv) Enhancement of Apache Flink, the EU Big Data platform; and v) Real-world industrial validation of the technology developed The PROTEUS impact is manifold: i) strategic, by reducing the gap and dependency from the US technology, empowering the EU Big Data industry through the enrichment of the EU platform Apache Flink; ii) economic, by fostering the development of new skills and new job positions and opportunities towards economic growth; iii) industrial, by considering real-world requirements from industry and by validating the outcome on an operational setting, and iv) scientific, by developing original hybrid and streaming analytic architectures that enable scalable online machine learning strategies and advanced interactive visualisation techniques that are applicable for general data streams in other domains.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.71M | Year: 2016

Although computer animation technology has been extensively used for films and games, it remains largely labour-intensive and expensive, with recent blockbuster films (e.g. Avatar, Gravity) costing around $1 million per minute of footage. A lot of research efforts and technological breakthroughs are therefore necessary if it is to be widely applied to many low-cost applications, such as archiving and reproducing style-preserved intangible cultural heritage (ICH) contents. The project AniAge is designed to answer this very challenge, using Southeast Asian ICH as the main application. Southeast Asian ICHs, e.g. local dances and puppetry, are visually and culturally rich, but are unfortunately disappearing due to the globalized modernization. The overall aim of AniAge is two-fold. The first is to develop novel techniques and tools to reduce the production costs and improve the level of automation without sacrificing the control of the artists, in order to preserve the performing art related ICHs of Southeast Asia. This involves capturing and processing versatile visual performance data, which are heterogeneous in nature and gigantic in quantity. Two areas of technological innovation are aimed to be made, which are novel algorithms for 3D computer animation; and visual asset management with data analytics and machine learning techniques. The second is to promote knowledge exchange and dissemination between EU and Southeast Asian partners, with a view to fostering researchers and spreading knowledge. This will be achieved by having researchers participating in the well-designed research projects, workshops, seminars and open lectures. This consortium consists of six partners, two from the EU and four from Southeast Asia. Four work packages are designed, three for technological developments (digitalizing traditional performing arts - DigAge, digital asset management - ManD and stylized animation production - AniX) and one for dissemination (Dissem).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 909.00K | Year: 2017

Over the years, changes in modern infrastructure have introduced new challenges to firefighting practices. Training and research programs have been developed to manage these challenges but there are still significant losses from fires each year. In 2013 alone, the fire departments in the USA responded to over 1.2 million fires which resulted in about 3,420 civilian fatalities, 15,925 injuries and property losses of about $12.4 billion dollars. In the UK, 192,600 fires responses, approximately 350 civilian fatalities, 10,300 injuries. The firefighting and rescue functions of the existing equipment and apparatus and their dexterity are limited, particularly in the harsh firefighting environments. The SMOOTH project aims to propose a novel robot-assisted decision making system in smart firefighting to perform searching and rescuing practice in the fire ground, and to facilitate the decision makings with higher efficiency. In the proposed system, a dexterous group of autonomous robots will be ingested, including an Octopus robot developed by SJTU with dexterous robotic upper body developed (with functions of high payload, forcible entry, excavation, obstacle avoidance and sweeping), a group of jumping robots invented by BU and YSU (with functions of obstacle avoidance) and a swarm of capsule systems invented by BU (with functions of precise positioning, narrow openings maneuveration and manipulation). A bunch of novel wearable and environmental sensors will be assembled and equipped on the robots and firefighters protection suits to facilitate the real-time machine-to-machine communications. A 3-D human-robot interactions infrastructure will be created to facilitate efficient interactions between human adaptive mechatronics and adaptive networked control. Based on these concepts, the consortium will investigate the needs and key technologies such as hybrid autonomous and miniaturized robotic modules, wireless sensor technologies, advanced decision support algorithms,


Martin P.A.,Bournemouth University
Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society | Year: 2013

Although increasing efforts are being made to restore tropical forests, little information is available regarding the time scales required for carbon and plant biodiversity to recover to the values associated with undisturbed forests. To address this knowledge gap, we carried out a meta-analysis comparing data from more than 600 secondary tropical forest sites with nearby undisturbed reference forests. Above-ground biomass approached equivalence to reference values within 80 years since last disturbance, whereas below-ground biomass took longer to recover. Soil carbon content showed little relationship with time since disturbance. Tree species richness recovered after about 50 years. By contrast, epiphyte richness did not reach equivalence to undisturbed forests. The proportion of undisturbed forest trees and epiphyte species found in secondary forests was low and changed little over time. Our results indicate that carbon pools and biodiversity show different recovery rates under passive, secondary succession and that colonization by undisturbed forest plant species is slow. Initiatives such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and REDD+ should therefore encourage active management to help to achieve their aims of restoring both carbon and biodiversity in tropical forests.


Britton J.R.,Bournemouth University
Trends in Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2013

Introduction of free-living species also results in co-introduction of their parasites. Since recent advances have shown that native parasites dramatically alter food web structure, I evaluate here how introduced parasites might reorganise food webs. Empirical evidence suggests that introduced parasites alter food webs qualitatively through topological changes and quantitatively through shifts in trophic relationships arising from modified host phenotypic traits. I argue that predicting the extent of food web reorganisation is, however, difficult due to underlying ecological and evolutionary processes that could provide contrasting food web outcomes, including enemy release, biotic resistance, and parasite spillover and spillback. Nevertheless, I suggest these food web reorganisations represent a further aspect of human-mediated global change resulting in irreversible consequences across multiple trophic levels. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 330.74K | Year: 2016

Ecosystems provide a number of benefits to people, including food and timber production, areas for recreation, pollination of crops, fresh water, and the storage of carbon, which can help reduce the risk of climate change. People also benefit from wildlife, including both plant and animal species, both in terms of their aesthetic value, and from the functional role that such species play in the ecosystems of which they are a part. Many ecosystems in the UK, as in many other parts of the world, are currently at risk because of the combined effects of climate change, aerial pollution, changing patterns of land use and other forms of human disturbance. These factors can interact with each other, leading to major changes in ecosystems, which can affect their ability to provide benefits to people. Research is needed to identify which ecosystems are at risk of rapid transitions occurring, so that appropriate management and policy responses can be identified. Information is also needed on the potential impacts of such ecosystem tipping points on humans, through changes in the provision of ecosystem benefits. This project aims to provide this information, by studying the landscapes of Dorset, a southern English county. Here we will examine data that have been collected over a period of 80 years in a variety of different types of ecosystem, to analyse the changes that have occurred. We will use this information to see whether any tipping points have occurred in the past, or might occur in the future, which could affect human society. We will also study tipping points by comparing ecosystems along gradients of environmental degradation. In addition, we will explore whether the environmental degradation that has already happened in Dorset, or might happen in future, could affect employment and prospects for economic development. We will test the idea that factors such as climate change, aerial pollution and land use change could cause a tipping point in ecosystems, which could have major economic consequences. We will achieve this using a combination of field data and computer models, which we will use to forecast how such impacts might occur at the landscape scale. The project will help increase understanding of how major ecological changes occur in agricultural landscapes typical of much of the UK, and their potential impacts. This information will be of value for identifying which ecosystems are particularly at risk of tipping points, what are the processes that cause such tipping points, and what the implications of them might be for human society. We will also examine how such problems might be averted in future, through the development of appropriate management and policy responses.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 2.45M | Year: 2016

The Hyksos (Greek rendering of the Egyptian title rulers of the foreign countries) were a dynasty of foreign rulers of Egypt between c.1640 and 1530 BC. Some modern researchers, following the ancient historian Flavius Josephus (1st cent. AD) thought they were ancestors of the early Israelites, others suggested that their appearance should be tied to the Hurrian expansion to the Levant. Most scholars today think, according to the onomastic data, that they were western Semites. Their geographical origin in the Levant, their seizure of power and their role in history, remains, however, an enigma, as the period is poorly represented in texts. Nevertheless the Hyksos phenomenon has thus far mainly been studied by text-based Egyptology. In the last decades, however, excavations at T. el-Daba, T. el-Rotaba, T. el Maskhuta and other places in the eastern Delta have produced an enormous wealth of new data such as urban settlements, palaces, tombs, temples, offering remains, besides enormous quantities of material culture and physical remains which can be attributed to the carriers of the Hyksos rule and their predecessors. These materials, left thus far largely aside in the historical discussion, can be utilised as first class historical sources. The envisaged investigations will be conducted in 8 interrelated research tracks, incorporating an array of archaeological, historical, theoretical and analytical sciences. The aim is to reveal in a holistic approach the origin, the dialogue with and the impact of western Asiatic people on culture of the host country and finally their heritage. They played a much greater role in the history of the Old World than envisaged and pushed Egypt into the focus of what happened in the Near East in the 2nd millennium BC. This innovative exploration of the Hyksos phenomenon has the potential to write a new chapter in the history of this salient region and offer a model.

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