Botanical Survey of India

Bhubaneshwar, India

Botanical Survey of India

Bhubaneshwar, India

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Srivastava R.C.,Botanical Survey of India
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2010

Arunachal Pradesh, falling under Eastern Himalayan region, which is one of the global mega-diversity centre, is a botanical paradise with ca 4,485 species of angiosperms; 44 taxa of gymnosperms; ca 350 species of bryophytes; over 550 species pteridophytes; over 300 species of algae (only 52 species published so far) and over 5,350 species of fungi (including ca 350 species of lichens) and is the home of 110 ethnic communities (tribes) most of which are still forest dwellers and so diverse that they can not understand each others language. Hindi is gradually becoming popular among the persons, who are near townships. The paper throws light on the plants used by Nyishi (Daffla) including Hill Miri tribes in their day to day life.


Singh D.,Botanical Survey of India
Lindbergia | Year: 2012

Cheilolejeunea trifaria (Reinw. et al.) Mizut. is widely distributed in East and South-east Asia, Central and South America, Africa and Australia (Mizutani 1972, 1982, Tan and Engel 1986, Piippo 1990, Wigginton and Grolle 1996, Zhu and So 2001, McCarthy 2006, Yamada and Iwatsuki 2006). In India the species was known only from Andaman in Andaman and Nicobar Islands (Joshi 2001) till recently when Daniels and Mabel (2010) recorded it from the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu in Indian mainland. While, Joshi (l.c.) did not provide any taxonomic description or illustrations for the plants from the Andaman, the one provided by Daniels and Mabel ((l.c.) for the Western Ghats plants not only failed to provide the details of vital taxonomic features, but also full of inconsistencies between the description and the drawing, hence of little use rather misleading for the taxonomists working on this group. During the course of ongoing studies on Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of Sikkim the author collected some interesting corticolous population of the genus Cheilolejeunea (Spruce) Schiffn. with plants having orbicular, imbricate leaves with 4-5 times as wide as the stem underleaves, sub-orbicular, bilobed to 1/4-1/3 of its length, male bracteoles present only at the basal portion of the androecial branches and obovate, 5-keeled perianth from the North district of Sikkim. In the morphological characteristics, the plants fully compare with typical C. trfaria - a species hitherto unknown in Indian Himalayan region as borne out by the review of relevant literature (Mizutani 1963, 1972, 1980, 1982, Asthana et al. 1995, Thiers 1997, Zhu and So 2001, Zhu et al. 2002). The same has been described and illustrated in detail to facilitate its easy identification in Indian bryoflora and remove the confusion caused by the publication of Daniels and Mabel ((l.c.).


The study was carried out to analyze the nutritional composition, mineral contents and antioxidant activity of the leaves of Clerodendron colebrookianum, Oenanthe linearis, Sonchus arvensis, Zanthoxylum acanthopodium, roots of Houttuynia cordata, Potentilla lineate and seeds of Castanopsis indica collected from different market of Meghalaya state, India using standard method of food analysis. For different plant species the crude fat content ranged between 0.579±0.01-2.46±0.04% and crude fibre 0.59±0.03-6.30±0.45%. The crude protein content was determined high in the leaves of Z. acanthopodium (28.06±0.14%), C. colebrookianum (27.67±0.42%) and O. linearis (21.80±0.41%) while the carbohydrate content was highest in the nuts of C. indica (61.86±1.42%) and roots of H. cordata (23.45±2.11%). The nutritive value ranged from 883.75±54.03-2724.86±54.50 cal kg -1 in the various wild edible plants. Among the various macronutrients estimated in the plant samples of different wild edible plant potassium was present in the highest quantity (16.10-84.40 mg g -1) followed by calcium (5.85-23.70 mg g -1) and sodium (0.95-3.20 mg g -1). Micronutrients, such as iron, zinc, copper, manganese and chromium were analyzed in the different plant specimens. The antioxidant activity of wild edible plants was examined. The content of total phenolics in the aqueous methanolic extracts was calculated as Gallic Acid Equivalent (GAE) and radical scavenging activity was estimated as IC 50 values using 1,1- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The total phenol varied from 17.32±0.10 to 552.01±0.48 mg g -1 in the extracts. The highest radical scavenging effect was observed in C. indica with IC 50 = 115.27±0.24 μg mL -1. The greater amount of phenolic compound leads to more potent radical scavenging effect as shown by C. indica. Nutritive values of these plants were compared to the other wild and commercial leafy vegetables and fruits. It has been observed that the mineral contents and nutritional values of the plants evaluated in the present study were richer than that of the conventional leafy vegetables and fruits. © 2011 Knowledgia Review, Malaysia.


Bandyopadhyay S.,Botanical Survey of India
Telopea | Year: 2015

Phanera jampuiensis Darlong & D.Bhattach. (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae: Cercideae) is here treated as a new synonym of Phanera glabrifolia Benth. var. glabrifolia. A collection from Tripura State, India, is the first collection of this variety from the wild after more than 160 years after P. glabrifolia was described in Hortus Botanicus Calcuttensis. © 2015 Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust.


Seal T.,Botanical Survey of India
Research Journal of Botany | Year: 2011

This study was carried out to analyze the nutritional value of some wild edible fruits like of Morus indica Linn. (Moraceae), Myrica nagi Thunb (Myricaceae), Myrica esculenta Buch-Ham exD. Don. (Myricaceae), Parkia roxburghii G. Don (Mimosaceae), Prunus nepalensis Ser (Steud) (Rosaceae) and Terminalia bellerica Roxb (Combretaceae), by determining proximate and phytochemical composition using standard method of food analysis like AOAC. The present study revealed that for different plant species the crude fat content ranged between 1.36±0.04-5.07±0.05%. The crude protein content was determined highest in the fruits of P. roxburghii (19.75±0.03%) while the available carbohydrate content was highest in M. indica (84.04±0.12%). The nutritive value ranged from 366.57±0.62-395.04±0.54 kcal/100 g in the various wild edible fruits. Among the various macronutrients estimated in the plant samples of different wild edible plants potassium was present in the highest quantity (7.28±0.10-12.73±0.12 mg g-1) followed by calcium (4.23±0.07-9.75±0.11 mg g-1) and sodium (0.395±0.005-1.01±0.01 mg g-1). Micronutrients, such as iron, zinc, copper, manganese and chromium were analyzed in the different plant specimens. The result indicates that nutritional values and mineral contents of these wild fruits under investigation were richer than that of the commercial fruits and very much comparable with the various wild fruits reported earlier. The present study also gives an account of ethnobotanical importance of the wild fruits under investigation. © 2011 Academic Journals Inc.


A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method using photodiode array detector with gradient elution has been developed and validated for the simultaneous estimation of ascorbic acid, free phenolic acids and flavonoids (catechin, rutin, quercetin, myrecetin, apigenin and Kaempferol) in four different solvent extracts of two wild edible leaves of viz. Sonchus arvensis and Oenanthe linearis, collected from North-eastern region in India . The chromatographic separation was carried out on Acclaim C 18 column (5 μm particle size,250 x 4.6 mm), Dionex Ultimate 3000 liquid chromatograph and detection was carried out at three different wave lengths (272, 280 and 310 nm) using a mobile phase of acetonitrile and 1% aqueous acetic acid solution with gradient elution. The experimental results showed high amount of ascorbic acid in S. arvensis and O. Linearis (1.2% and 2.3 % respectively) and gallic acid (0.02% and 0.06% respectively) in 1% aq. acetic acid extract of these two plants. The high percentage of recovery (96-103%), low coefficient of variation (R2 > 0.99) and low limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) confirm the suitability of the method for simultaneous quantification of ascorbic acid and all phenolic compounds in the two plants under investigation. © 2016 Tapan Seal.


Bandyopadhyay S.,Botanical Survey of India
Edinburgh Journal of Botany | Year: 2015

The authorship of the name Bauhinia diphylla (Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae) has to be attributed to Banks instead of Buchanan-Hamilton. A lectotype is designated here for Bauhinia diphylla Banks [= Lysiphyllum diphyllum (Banks) de Wit]. Copyright © Trustees of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 2015.


Bandyopadhyay S.,Botanical Survey of India
Phytotaxa | Year: 2016

The name Bauhinia galpinii is lectotypified here. © 2016 Magnolia Press.


Scurrula paramjitii L. J. Singh (Loranthaceae) is described and illustrated here as a new species from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India along with an inventory of host species. This is the second species of the genus known to be endemic to the Andaman and Nicobar Islands as previously only Scurrula parasitica L. was known from this region. Scurrula paramjitii is distinguished from all other species of the genus by its morphology of vegetative and floral characters. However, it appears apparently close to Scurrula parasitica L. © 2015 College of Life Science. All rights reserved.


Bandyopadhyay S.,Botanical Survey of India
Phytotaxa | Year: 2014

Bauhinia bassacensis var. nicobarica has been treated here as a synonym of Phanera bassacensis. © 2014 Magnolia Press.

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