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News Article | November 9, 2015
Site: www.treehugger.com

When the World Health Organization reclassified glyphosate-based herbicides as a possible carcinogen back in March, it was an unexpected boon to rebel groups in Colombia. Until recently, the controversial herbicide had been the Colombian government’s weapon of choice in battling cocaine crops that fund the fighting. Last week, the country’s president Juan Manuel Santos announced that they would stop using the herbicide, which has been linked to miscarriages, skin issues and even cancer. Glyphosate is the main ingredient in Roundup. Santos’ decision is a great victory for people’s health and the environment, but also for the rebels who often employ armed guards to protect the crops, making manual eradication daunting. With all of this in mind, the government is looking for alternative ways to destroy the crops – one idea that is being considered is employing coca-loving caterpillars that would make mincemeat of the harvest. For years now a number of scientists have promoted the idea of using the cocaine tussock moth to do the dirty work. The moth Eloria noyesi, known as "el gringo" by the locals, only lays its eggs on coca leaves; which the caterpillars then consume. Carlos Alberto Gomez, president of the privately funded National Network of Botanical Gardens says, “Its instincts allow it to find coca plants wherever they are.” The scheme would include rearing thousands of the moths in a lab, then releasing them in the jungles where the guerilla groups grow their bounty. Gomez says that the moths will go straight for the coca plants, lay gobs of eggs and wipe out the coca once their caterpillars hatch. Using insects to take the place of unhealthy chemicals is wonderfully poetic on paper – and maybe it would work beautifully, and just about anything has got to be better than glyphosate – but we’ve seen again and again that fighting one living thing with the orchestrated influx of another living thing can bring about unwanted consequences. And there’s a vocal group of those who are concerned about introducing a wide swath of tussock moths into the environment. Gonzalo Andrade, a butterfly researcher at Bogota’s National University, says that of the five species of Colombia’s coca crops, only one or two can be used to produce cocaine. “If the moth turns out to eat other coca species, I wouldn’t be so sure about deploying it because it could destroy [legal] coca crops used by indigenous communities for traditional purposes," he says. Ricardo Vargas, director of the environmental group Andean Action, says that unleashing a large population of moths into the area could throw the local ecosystem into confusion. "With a plan like this, the chance for ecological mischief is very high and very dangerous," Vargas told the Associated Press in 2005. Which might not be a problem if the rebels decide to fight the moths with insecticides, which would introduce a whole new crop of potential health issues.


Virtual Tour Applications is a leading Virtual Reality and Mobile App Development Company Based in Austin, Texas. In 2017 the company is launching a new 360 degree video production service to showcase high end residential and commercial real estate projects. Austin, TX, November 20, 2016 --( Founded in 2012 by former University of Texas IC2 Institute "Think Tank" Global Programs Manager, Mark Alan Gipson, Virutal Tour App's clients include: COTA Circuit of the Americas, ACL-LIVE Austin City Limits, University of Texas AT&T Conference Center, BECK Construction, THINKERY Austin Children's Museum, City of Austin Zilker Botanical Gardens, and several projects in Houston such as the George R. Brown Convention Center, Wortham Center and Jones Hall. The company has also produced dozens of Virtual Reality Applications for high-end resorts and nightclubs in LA, Las Vegas and Miami. This new 4K 360X360 Degree Video Production Service will be the company's first product designed specifically for the Real Estate Industry. Virtual Tour App will feature select real estate projects at the 2017 SXSW Interactive Conference in Austin, Texas to showcase the new technology. Austin, TX, November 20, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Austin-Based, Virtual Tour Applications is introducing a new 360 degree video production service for Austin area realtors who want to showcase residential and commercial real estate with the latest 360 degree video technology.Founded in 2012 by former University of Texas IC2 Institute "Think Tank" Global Programs Manager, Mark Alan Gipson, Virutal Tour App's clients include: COTA Circuit of the Americas, ACL-LIVE Austin City Limits, University of Texas AT&T Conference Center, BECK Construction, THINKERY Austin Children's Museum, City of Austin Zilker Botanical Gardens, and several projects in Houston such as the George R. Brown Convention Center, Wortham Center and Jones Hall. The company has also produced dozens of Virtual Reality Applications for high-end resorts and nightclubs in LA, Las Vegas and Miami.This new 4K 360X360 Degree Video Production Service will be the company's first product designed specifically for the Real Estate Industry. Virtual Tour App will feature select real estate projects at the 2017 SXSW Interactive Conference in Austin, Texas to showcase the new technology. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Virtual Tour App


News Article | December 29, 2015
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

This collection of exhibits at the intersection of science and art should keep you entertained during the cold winter months, no matter where you are in the country. Get out of the house and enjoy! FRAGILE BEAUTY: The Art & Science of Sea Butterflies on view indefinitely Smithsonian Museum of Natural History 1st Floor, Center, Sant Ocean Hall, Research Case 10th St. & Constitution Ave. NW Washington, D.C. Artist Cornelia Kubler Kavanagh and biological oceanographer Gareth Lawson bring the plight of tiny ocean pteropods—or “sea butterflies” —to light with larger-than-life sculptures. Kavanagh’s sculptures are based on tiny sea snails no bigger than a grain of sand. They honor the floating beauty of these animals, while evoking their struggle to survive in the face of ocean acidification. Gareth Lawson, from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, studies ocean acidification and provided research that inspired Kavanagh’s creative work. REVEALING THE INVISIBLE: The History of Glass and the Microscope April 23, 2016 to March 19, 2017 The Corning Museum of Glass One Museum Way Corning, NY Glass made it possible for scientists and artists to see tiny living creatures once invisible to the human eye. Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope tells the stories of scientists’ and artists’ exploration of the microscopic world between the 1600s and the late 1800s. Their discoveries fed people’s hunger to learn more about nature, increasing the popularity of microscopes and driving improvements in scientific glass. These advances culminated in the 19th century with the advent of modern scientific glassmaking and the perfection of the microscope. Unleash your sense of discovery as you explore the invisible through historic microscopes, rare books, and period illustrations. View the artworks of 23 artists who were selected from more than 100 entrants from around the world for this year’s science-inspired exhibition about biodiversity and extinction. The co-jurors for this exhibition were Elizabeth Corr, manager of art partnerships at the Natural Resources Defense Council, and Paula J. Ehrlich, president & CEO of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation. This exhibition is the 17th International Art-Science Juried Exhibition organized by Art & Science Collaborations, Inc. (ASCI). Artists can use their skills and imagination to take on the issue of climate change and this work is now being seen in unprecedented numbers. The artists in Tipping Points use a variety of mediums including painting, photography, video, sculpture and drawing. Some have been partnering with scientists and environmental organizations. Others have been researching and documenting changes in glaciers and diminishing ice on trips to far northern regions of the planet; including boat trips to the Arctic and Antarctic. Some take a more poetic and imaginative approach to confront the seriousness of the issue and single biggest challenge of our time. HISTORICAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF SKIN DISEASE: Selections from the New Sydenham Society Atlas 1860-1884 September 17, 2015 - January 10, 2016 Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Sterling Hall of Medicine 333 Cedar Street New Haven, CT In this exhibit, Yale dermatologists Jean Bolognia and Irwin Braverman present the celebrated nineteenth century illustrations to a current clinical audience, making a relevant teaching point with each plate.  Twenty-five of the Atlas’ forty-nine plates are selected for display.  They depict cutaneous diseases ranging from the common, e.g. psoriasis and eczema, to the rare, e.g. iododerma and systematized epidermal nevi.  Examples of skin signs of systemic disease, including Addison’s disease, neurofibromatosis, and lupus erythematosus, are also shown.  The emotional toll which these chronic diseases inflicted upon patients is a striking feature of the many portraits on view. This innovative new exhibition, Emergence: Craft + Technology, features work that exemplifies the ever-increasing intertwining of advanced digital processes with traditional hand-made craft. Whether through the use of computer design programs, CNC and automated tools, or 3D printing, we celebrate the use of new technologies in the production of state-of-the-art craft. MACRO OR MICRO?: Challenging our Perceptions of Scale Museum of Science Art & Science Gallery 1 Science Park Boston, MA Today, researchers study the Earth at a variety of scales and with a variety of advanced equipment. While satellites take images of entire landscapes, electron microscopes use a beam of electrons to magnify objects up to 500,000 times. The resulting images, which differ in scale of a million times or more, are featured side-by-side in Macro or Micro? Challenging our perceptions of scale. Geographer Stephen Young and biologist Paul Kelly, both with Salem State University, have gathered compelling images from their scientific research to test viewers' perceptions of the Earth. Challenge yourself to determine the scale of these stunning images — the patterns and similarities between macro and micro views may surprise you. Artist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison creates large scale ceramic installations and sculptures inspired by science and marine biology. Her intricate hand-crafted porcelain works celebrate the fragile beauty of endangered coral reef ecosystems and promote awareness to conserve and protect our natural world. Origin of the Universe. Evolution of the Universe. String Theory. Dark Matter. Dark Energy. Multiverse. Unification of Space + Time. Our Solar System. Cultural Cosmology. Art.Science.Gallery.’s science-inspired printmakers explore the cosmos in this far out exhibition for PrintAustin 2016, a city-wide printmaking festival. BIRDS OF TENNESSEE: Celebrating the Centennial of the Tennessee Ornithological Society October 5, 2015 - TBD McClung Museum of Natural History & Culture University of Tennessee, Knoxville 1327 Circle Park Drive Knoxville, TN To celebrate the centennial of the Tennessee Ornithological Society (TOS), the museum is displaying fifty-six engravings and lithographs featuring the birds of Tennessee. Spanning two hundred years from 1731 to 1931, the prints on view are by twelve artists: Eleazar Albin, Mark Catesby, Xaviero Manetti, Alexander Wilson, Titian Ramsay Peale, Alexander Rider, Prideaux John Selby, John James Audubon, John Gould, Daniel Giraud Elliot, Henry Eeles Dresser, and Rex Brasher. The works on view are drawn from the museum’s extensive collection of over three thousand ornithological prints and are on display in the pull-out drawer case in the entrance to the Decorative Arts gallery. 25 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope July 12, 2015 - January 17, 2016 Museum of Arts and Sciences 4182 Forsyth Road Baton Rouge, LA Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided stunning images of far-away stars, galaxies, and nebulae, and has shed light on many of the great mysteries of the universe. Today, HST continues to provide views of cosmic wonders never before seen. This exhibit displays some of the most intriguing images taken by HST over the past 25 years. CONDENSED MATTER COMMUNITY by appointment through January 2016 Synchrotron Radiation Center: Home of Aladdin 3731 Schneider Dr. Stoughton, WI Condensed Matter Community is a site-specific curatorial project organized by Kristof Wickman and Evan Gruzis intended to generate a dialogue about science, aesthetics, progress and entropy. The project uses the site of a decommissioned particle accelerator facility in rural Wisconsin, The Synchrotron Radiation Center: Home of Aladdin, as an exhibition space to frame a selection of artworks, prior to forthcoming experiments. NUMBERS IN NATURE: A Mirror Maze new permanent exhibit Museum of Science and Industry 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL Patterns are everywhere if you know where to look! From the delicate nested spirals of a sunflower’s seeds, to the ridges of a majestic mountain range, to the layout of the universe, mathematical patterns abound in the natural world. Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze is a new permanent exhibit that will expose and explain the patterns that surround us. As you enter Numbers in Nature, lenticular images and an immersive large-format film reveal these repeating patterns hidden throughout nature: spirals, occurrences of the "golden ratio" (), Voronoi patterns, and fractal branching. You will even discover patterns and ratios found in your own body and in centuries of music, art, and architecture so that you'll never look at the world the same way again. This exhibition explores the relationship between culture and nature, one of the oldest human tropes. In this recurring schism, humans believe ourselves to be of nature and, alternately, distinct from it. As we search texts and traditions to support either position, the persistence of the trope itself is underscored; it’s an impasse, shifting in form. It’s also an embrace of or a resistance to the natural world that produced us; from which we believe we stand apart. In Raw and Cooked, artists Jim Jacobs, Joshua Winegar, and Paul Crow present work within this nature/culture dialectic. Jacobs begins with an ancient horticultural intervention, the graft, to focus our attention on a literal intersection of the natural and the human-made. Winegar takes on the natural world as a partner in a conversation with his psyche, alternately responding to, and intervening in, the world which surrounds him. Crow maps the span of his life onto the time frame of the human awareness of global climate change. Each artist begins with material that exists before agency and brings it through a process of intervention to manifest a hybrid: the artist in dialogue both with the world and without, and with an inner understanding of that world. ATOMS + BYTES: Redefining Craft in the Digital Age March 4 – June 26, 2016 Bellevue Arts Museum 510 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue, WA Today's makers have access to a wider array of tools, materials, and processes than ever before. Digital methods such as scanning and imaging, coding, CNC-milling, and rapid prototyping not only influence the way objects are designed, manufactured, and distributed, but also change the terms of our relationships with them. Atoms + Bytes: Redefining Craft in the Digital Age will showcase works by 30 international and local makers situated at the intersection of the digital and the analogue worlds. These artists, craftspeople, and designers excel in material practices that span millennia of craft traditions, while drawing on cutting-edge digital tools to develop innovative ways of making. The integration of these atoms and bytes, building blocks of matter and information, generates the new forms and typologies that shape our changing world. Through the presentation of works that embody mergers of traditional and digital processes and materials, Atoms + Bytes reframes the conversation about the place of technology within the historical trajectory of object-making and offers an invitation to reevaluate the way we place value on craft and define "hand-made." FIRES OF CHANGE November 19, 2015 – April 3, 2016 University of Arizona Museum of Art 1031 North Olive Road Tucson, AZ The worlds of art and fire science come together in Fires of Change. Curated by Flagstaff installation artist Shawn Skabelund, Fires of Change explores the increase in severity, size, and number of wildfires in the Southwest and their impact on the landscape through the eyes of artists. Through the art, visitors can get a sense of the true impact of the fires, from human to environmental. Fires of Change is an NEA and Joint Fire Science Consortium funded exhibition originating at the Coconino Center for the Arts in Flagstaff. Eleven artists spent a week in 2014 in fire science boot camp with the Southwest Fire Science Consortium and the Landscape Conservation Initiative to learn about the impact of wildfire in Northern Arizona.  They then spent the year creating original works in reaction to their experiences. CALIFORNIA FLORA: Botanical Paintings in Colored Pencil by Nina Antze January 7, 2016 – April 25, 2016 Please call ahead 707-527-9277 x 107 to see exhibit Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA California Flora is an exhibit of botanical paintings by colored pencil artist Nina Antze. The paintings were created over the past eight years and focus mainly on California natives. Also included are paintings documenting Luther Burbank’s Experiment Farm in Sebastopol and a piece from the Alcatraz Florilegium, a documentation of the plants of the Alcatraz gardens. Nina Antze is a botanical artist and quilt maker living in Northern California. She has a degree in Fine Art from San Francisco State University and has a Certificate in Botanical Illustration from the New York Botanical Gardens. She teaches Colored Pencil classes in the Botanical Certificate Program at Filoli Gardens, at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts and around the Bay Area. Her botanical paintings and colored pencil drawings have been exhibited in New York, at the Huntington Library, and at Filoli Gardens and her quilts have won numerous awards. She works in colored pencil, watercolor pencil and fabric. Her botanicals can be viewed at her website, www.pcquilt.com THE ALCATRAZ FLORILEGIUM: A Special Botanical Art Exhibit January 16 - 29, 2016 University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley 200 Centennial Drive Berkeley, CA The Northern California Society of Botanical Artists (NCSBA) in collaboration with the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy and the Garden Conservancy has created a florilegium, a series of botanical paintings, to document the plants of The Gardens of Alcatraz. The UC Botanical Garden is thrilled to welcome the NCSBA to exhibit this special showing of the Alcatraz Florilegium, with over 70 drawings and paintings, in our beautiful Julia Morgan Hall. TENTACLES: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid, and Cuttlefishes April 12, 2014 - September 2016 Monterey Bay Aquarium 886 Cannery Row Monterey, CA Journey to a world of undersea magicians, masters of disguise and quick-change artists. Our special exhibition is the largest, most diverse living exhibit ever created to showcase these amazing animals. You won't believe your eyes. A walk from Mount Diablo to the Hayward shoreline would cross through many ecosystems, each with their own unique set of inhabitants. Some of these creatures have very specific needs and limited ranges. Others are more adaptable and seem perfectly at home in an urban backyard. This collection of work by science illustrator Lucy Conklin explores the vast array of wildlife in the East Bay, and some of our unusual visitors. Whether they are long time residents, returning to their natural habitat after a long hiatus, or an oddity passing through unexplained, their journeys have a story. Creative inspiration is at the heart of both science and art – and our array of indoor and outdoor art installations blend art and science in delightful and insightful ways. Current installations include: BEAM Robot Fish: Controlled by solar cells, this BEAM robot sculpture (Biology, Electronic, Aesthetics, Mechanics) is designed to live, feed and fend for itself in the ocean. Cloud: Check out this mesmerizing art installation composed of hundreds of rotating glass panels designed to mimic the changes of state from solid to liquid to gas. Jacquard Coverlet: Marvel at this wall hanging woven on our antique Jacquard loom by volunteers. Like a computer, the loom’s mechanism uses binary to create the pattern. Do you know of any exhibits or have an upcoming exhibit that should be included on this list? Send me an email at symbiartic (dot) km (at) gmail (dot) com, or tweet me @eyeforscience with the deets. If it's scienceart related, it's fair game.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Significant changes in the distribution of plants on Earth can be a reality by 2050. The prediction is made by scientists from Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate at the University of Copenhagen, based on fossilized pollen. The pollen stems from plants that existed during previous periods with climate changes - similar to those expected in this century. We still cannot physically travel in time, but ancient fossils can - like a time machine - give us knowledge about the past and the future. In a study published today in Nature, scientists use fossilized pollen to examine the future of biodiversity on Earth under climate change. The scientists predict profound changes in the distribution of plants globally. Lead-author of the study, Associate Professor David Nogués-Bravo from Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate at the Natural History Museum of Copenhagen, says, - Surprisingly, our results forecast major shifts in abundance and composition of plants in forests, grasslands and other plants communities. These transformations will occur already by the middle of this century. It means that our own grandchildren will encounter largely different landscapes compared to those we know today. They will see new species in forests, on prairies and scrublands, while other species, that are common in those areas today, will be gone. The prediction is based on records of fossilized pollen from plants that lived between 20,000 years ago to present. During this time, ice sheets melted and global temperatures rose by 4 to 5 degrees, similar to the temperature rises expected for this century. Professor Jack Williams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, co-author of the study, elaborates, - The fossil record gives us a natural model system for studying species responses to climate change. We can see that ecosystems were transformed by past climate changes, for ecosystems both on land and in waters - and across many regions. Thus, we can expect similarly profound changes throughout the Earth. The records of pollen used in the study comprised 100 European plant taxa from 546 sites, and 87 North American plant taxa from 527 sites. The study shows that one third of North American plants and more than half of European plants may face increased threat status in the future due to climate change. Central North America and southern Europe are the most exposed regions. - The findings of our study based on paleorecords highlight the vital importance of biological archives. Archives like those at Natural History Museums, Botanical Gardens and digital internet databases. They provide conservation assessments directly relevant and useful for conservation policies of today and for the future, concludes Professor Carsten Rahbek, senior-author on the article.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

December is a beautiful time to visit San Francisco—just don’t expect to see snow on the ground. No matter how cold California natives might find the weather, Dec. 25 in San Francisco is guaranteed to be warmer than at least 38 other states. And it’s bound to be considerably less crowded than the slushy sidewalks of Manhattan. All this means that there are plenty of reasons to be out and about in San Francisco on Christmas Day. Ice Skate in Downtown San Francisco All three downtown San Francisco ice skating rinks (Yerba Buena Gardens, the Embarcadero Center and Union Square) are open for you to show off your triple axels on Christmas Day, the latter two until late in the evening. The Union Square rink is particularly jolly, as the commercial bustle will have ceased but the adjacent holiday tree remains lit. San Francisco Zoo & Gardens The Reindeer Romp at the San Francisco Zoo & Gardens runs from Nov. 19 to Jan. 1, and stays open Christmas Day. Those reindeer don’t even take the day off! Considering the zoo is across the street from the Pacific Ocean, it’s hard not to take a bonus trip to the beach in late December, especially with a cup of hot chocolate from the Lemur Café. San Francisco Botanical Gardens Society at Strybing Arboretum The Botanical Gardens are Golden Gate Park’s most manicured jewel. Although San Francisco residents never pay an entrance fee, the gates are flung open to everyone on Christmas Day. Roam through 55 acres of native plants, succulents, magnolias, a grove of redwoods, the Ancient Plant Garden, and the rest of the 8,000 species on display, some of which might even be in bloom (especially the Mesoamerican Cloud Forest). If you’re lucky, the weather will be temperate enough for a picnic.. Contemporary Jewish Museum The Contemporary Jewish Museum is open on Christmas. Better yet, it’s a Community Free Day, so all the galleries are open (which means advance registration is highly recommended). Art-making, musical performances and a nosh from Wise Sons Delicatessen round out a wonderful holiday afternoon inside Daniel Libeskind’s post-modern cube. Kung Pao Kosher Comedy Kung Pao Kosher Comedy brings together the Jewish comedic heritage with the venerable tradition of eating Chinese food on Christmas. Comic Lisa Geduldig began performing at the 370-seat New Asia Restaurant in Chinatown in 1993, and the tradition has grown every year since. This year’s performances happen Dec. 23-25. Brunch at the Palace Hotel The freshly renovated Palace Hotel turns into a holiday wonderland each year, with a giant gingerbread house and tea with Santa every Saturday in December. Spoil yourself at one of six brunch seatings on Christmas Day, in either the Grand Ballroom or the fabulous 19th century Garden Court. An upscale buffet as opposed to a standard meal (think crepes and a carving station), its Yuletide grandeur befits both the occasion and the surroundings. Check out which restaurants are open on Christmas Day. The San Francisco Travel Association is the official destination marketing organization for the City and County of San Francisco. For information on reservations, activities and more, visit http://www.sftravel.com, read the Visitors Planning Guide or call 415-391-2000. San Francisco Travel also operates Visitor Information Centers at Hallidie Plaza, 900 Market St. at the corner of Powell and Market streets and on the lower level of Macy’s Union Square. American Express® is the official Card partner of the San Francisco Travel Association. San Francisco International Airport (SFO) offers non-stop flights to more than 44 international cities on 38 international carriers. The Bay Area's largest airport connects non-stop with 78 cities in the U.S. on 13 domestic airlines. SFO offers upgraded free Wi-Fi with no advertising. For up-to-the-minute departure and arrival information, airport maps and details on shopping, dining, cultural exhibitions, ground transportation and more, visit http://www.flysfo.com. Follow SFO on http://www.twitter.com/flysfo and http://www.facebook.com/flysfo. Note to editors: Press releases and other media resources are available at http://www.sftravel.com/media. The San Francisco Travel Photo Video Library is available at http://barberstock.com/sanfranciscotravel. For news and story ideas, follow @SFMediaRelation on Twitter and @OnlyinSF on Instagram. To sign up for e-newsletters on San Francisco travel, culinary or LGBT news, click here.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: en.prnasia.com

HONG KONG, Dec. 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- To celebrate the holiday season, Cafe on 8 at Two MacDonnell Road presents to diners an exciting array of culinary delights. Indulge in the Cafe's new international lunch buffet, as well as a tempting Christmas and New Year's Eve lunch buffet and set dinner with a wide selection of festive delicacies, all in a comfortable homey setting. Christmas & New Year's Eve Lunch Buffet Savour a joyous afternoon this upcoming Christmas and New Year's Eve in a scrumptious spread of festive lunch buffet prepared with an international fare, available from 23 to 31 December. At HKD 268 for adult and HKD 198 for child, the lunch buffet menu includes traditional Christmas favourites such as Roasted Turkey Breast in Cranberry Sauce and Pan-fried Honey Gammon Ham. Other buffet items available are assorted sashimi and tempura, Baked Garlic Oysters, Christmas Pudding and Creme Brulee. Diners can also top off the meal with a special beverage package of HKD 48 per person for a free flow of fresh juices. Christmas & New Year's Eve Set Dinner For those who crave for a hearty feast, diners can also enjoy an alluring four-course set dinner from 24 to 26 and 31 December at HKD 350, from Parma Ham and Rock Melon Salad, Shrimp Bisque, choice of entree such as Pan-fried Angus Beef Tenderloin, Pan-fried Tiger Prawns with Garden Salad or Grilled Whole Spring Chicken, to the Cafe's signature Portuguese Pudding as dessert. Complement the meal with a glass of sparkling wine, red and white wine for just an additional HKD 108 per person. Regular Lunch Buffet Starting 1 December, Cafe on 8 also presents a new lunch buffet, featuring a full variety of chilled seafood, assorted sashimi and charcuterie platter, freshly mixed salad, savoury hot dishes and sweet dessert bites, pricing at HKD 168 for adult and HKD 118 for child. Managed by Lanson Place, Two MacDonnell Road and its restaurant Cafe on 8 boast spectacular views of the lush mountain and iconic Central city skyline. Spend a warm and cosy Christmas at Cafe on 8, an ideal venue for gathering family and friends to celebrate the festive season. For restaurant reservations and enquiries, please contact +852 2132-2688 or email fnb@mr2.com.hk. For more information, please visit http://twomr.com.hk/promotions/Christmas%20Dining%20Offers. The above prices are charged per person and subject to 10% service charge. About Two MacDonnell Road Conveniently set in a vibrant residential neighbourhood within the city's prestigious Mid-levels, Central, accommodation at this restful oasis boast green tropical views backed by Hong Kong's iconic architectural skyline. Two MacDonnell Road offers 213 classically decorated rooms, private gymnasium, a popular restaurant Cafe on 8 and free shuttle bus service, the property enjoys an unrivalled location close to Central's key financial district and cool entertainment hubs Lan Kwai Fong and Soho. Immediately surrounding the property are the city's lush Botanical Gardens and Hong Kong Park, making this hidden gem perfectly located for work, play and restoration. About Lanson Place Hospitality Management Limited Lanson Place is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Wing Tai Properties Limited (Wing Tai), a publicly listed company in Hong Kong (HKEx stock code:369), currently manages eleven properties (two of which Wing Tai has equity in) under the Lanson Place brand, comprising high-end hotels and serviced apartments in Shanghai, Chengdu, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Hong Kong. Lanson Place properties are generally located in close proximity to the central business district as well as shopping and entertainment precincts. Lanson Place aims to offer attentive and personalized service with the convenience of a luxury hotel and the comfort and privacy of home. The Group will continue to grow the "Lanson Place" brand as a pan-Asian brand and will continue to explore investment and management opportunities mainly in gateway cities in the Asia-Pacific region.


News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

After posting our early edition of 2016 science art exhibits nationwide, several artists got in touch to let me know about upcoming shows they are in. I updated the roundup accordingly and in the process, discovered four opening receptions in the next three weeks. If you are in the area and available, don't miss the opportunity to meet these accomplished artists face-to-face: Origin of the Universe. Evolution of the Universe. String Theory. Dark Matter. Dark Energy. Multiverse. Unification of Space + Time. Our Solar System. Cultural Cosmology. Art.Science.Gallery.’s science-inspired printmakers explore the cosmos in this far out exhibition for PrintAustin 2016, a city-wide printmaking festival. This exhibition explores the relationship between culture and nature, one of the oldest human tropes. In this recurring schism, humans believe ourselves to be of nature and, alternately, distinct from it. As we search texts and traditions to support either position, the persistence of the trope itself is underscored; it’s an impasse, shifting in form. It’s also an embrace of or a resistance to the natural world that produced us; from which we believe we stand apart. In Raw and Cooked, artists Jim Jacobs, Joshua Winegar, and Paul Crow present work within this nature/culture dialectic. Jacobs begins with an ancient horticultural intervention, the graft, to focus our attention on a literal intersection of the natural and the human-made. Winegar takes on the natural world as a partner in a conversation with his psyche, alternately responding to, and intervening in, the world which surrounds him. Crow maps the span of his life onto the time frame of the human awareness of global climate change. Each artist begins with material that exists before agency and brings it through a process of intervention to manifest a hybrid: the artist in dialogue both with the world and without, and with an inner understanding of that world. Artist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison creates large scale ceramic installations and sculptures inspired by science and marine biology. Her intricate hand-crafted porcelain works celebrate the fragile beauty of endangered coral reef ecosystems and promote awareness to conserve and protect our natural world. Born and raised in San Francisco, Courtney received an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Arts in Marine Ecology and Ceramic Sculpture from Skidmore College in 2008 and a Master of Arts in Environmental Studies from Brown University with coursework at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2011. Mattison has exhibited her work nationally including at the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, NY, the headquarters of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She lives and works in Denver, Colorado. Organized by the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art. Curated by Alison Byrne, Director of Exhibitions and Education. Exhibit details: Botanical Paintings in Colored Pencil by Nina Antze January 7, 2016 – April 25, 2016 Please call ahead 707-527-9277 x 107 to see exhibit Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA California Flora is an exhibit of botanical paintings by colored pencil artist Nina Antze. The paintings were created over the past eight years and focus mainly on California natives. Also included are paintings documenting Luther Burbank’s Experiment Farm in Sebastopol and a piece from the Alcatraz Florilegium, a documentation of the plants of the Alcatraz gardens. Nina Antze is a botanical artist and quilt maker living in Northern California. She has a degree in Fine Art from San Francisco State University and has a Certificate in Botanical Illustration from the New York Botanical Gardens. She teaches Colored Pencil classes in the Botanical Certificate Program at Filoli Gardens, at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts and around the Bay Area. Her botanical paintings and colored pencil drawings have been exhibited in New York, at the Huntington Library, and at Filoli Gardens and her quilts have won numerous awards. She works in colored pencil, watercolor pencil and fabric. Her botanicals can be viewed at her website, www.pcquilt.com Exhibit details: The Alcatraz Florilegium January 16 - 29, 2016 University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley 200 Centennial Drive Berkeley, CA The Northern California Society of Botanical Artists (NCSBA) in collaboration with the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy and the Garden Conservancy has created a florilegium, a series of botanical paintings, to document the plants of The Gardens of Alcatraz. The UC Botanical Garden is thrilled to welcome the NCSBA to exhibit this special showing of the Alcatraz Florilegium, with over 70 drawings and paintings, in the beautiful Julia Morgan Hall. For those unable to attend the exhibit in person, visit the online version here. _______________________________ If you have a scienceart exhibit that should be included in Symbiartic's regular scienceart roundup, with the relevant details.


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

With the help of their members and the public, Phoenix-based credit union, Arizona Federal, raised more than $8,000 during their eighth annual holiday raffle, which ended December 9, 2016. The money raised during is used to provide much-needed items to the children who attend the Wilson Community Center and their families. Every year Arizona Federal team members take the funds raised and go on a shopping spree for the Wilson Community Center – buying each child of the classrooms they sponsor a coat, shirt, pants, shoes, socks, hygiene items and a fun toy. Volunteers of the credit union wrap these presents and deliver them as Santa’s helpers for the children to open during their holiday celebration on the last day of school before winter break. In addition to providing holiday gifts, the program has allowed Arizona Federal to help supply uniforms to children attending the school, and provided food bags that the children and their families can take home over extended school breaks. “More than 25 percent of the children attending this school are homeless, and many more rely on the school’s free lunch program for their only meal of the day,” said Julie Rivas, director of risk mitigation and project chair for the holiday raffle. “Through this program, we can help give these kids a chance to just be a kid, and to help their parents stress less about where their family’s food will come from over winter and summer break,” Rivas added. “We’re thankful we can be involved – and that our members have been generous enough to make this program a success year after year.” Arizona Federal’s annual holiday raffle typically takes place from the middle of November through the beginning of December. Anyone who purchases entries is entered into a drawing for prizes that are donated from local businesses and credit union partners. Get Away Today, Desert Botanical Gardens, Bearizona, Ballet Arizona, Don Laughlin’s Riverside Resort, Edgewater Hotel, the Verde Canyon Railroad, Arizona Science Center, Wildlife World Zoo, Phoenix Zoo, Main Event, Children’s Museum of Phoenix, Tropicana Express, Aquarius Laughlin, Aquarium of the Pacific, Texas Roadhouse, Darden Restaurant Group, and Turf Paradise donated prizes for the 2016 raffle. About Arizona Federal Arizona Federal is a $1.4 billion not-for-profit, locally-owned financial cooperative providing financial services and expertise to more than 120,000 member/owners. Founded in 1936, the organization takes its mission of financial empowerment and mutual benefit to heart by providing members cutting-edge self-service tools, financial coaches, identity protection services, and annual member payouts when the cooperative does well. Arizona Federal has locations across the Phoenix metropolitan area. Deposits are insured by the National Credit Union Administration. About Wilson Community Center Wilson Community Center is a part of the Wilson Elementary School District in Phoenix, Arizona, offering classes from Pre-School to Eighth grade. With over 100 years in existence in Central Phoenix, the district serves an area where less than 25 percent of the community has a high school diploma, 94 percent of families qualify for free or reduced-price lunches, and 60 percent of children enter school speaking a language other than English. The goal of the district is to prepare the students for college through a focus on academics and a state-of-the-art technology program. For more information about the Wilson Elementary District, please visit http://www.wsd.k12.az.us.


News Article | January 20, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Right this moment, hundreds of miles above the Earth's surface, a fleet of 19 NASA satellites are silently orbiting the planet. As they travel along their individual paths, the spacecraft are constantly taking photos and collecting information that helps predict everything from impending hurricanes to aerosol levels in the atmosphere. But despite their importance, these satellites are easy to forget—because they're so difficult to see and imagine. That's something NASA is trying to change. For example, in March it released an animated video showing the satellites' various trajectories. This time around, it's taking a more aural approach to the problem with the a seashell-shaped structure called the Orbit Pavilion. Located outside NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, the spiraling aluminum structure amplifies a symphony of sounds, each of which corresponds to one of the 19 satellites in orbit, plus the International Space Station. The brains behind this 3,500-square-foot structure are Jason Klimoski and Leslie Chang, of the Brooklyn-based architecture firm StudioKCA. The brief was left extremely open, the duo explain: "They came to us and said we've got these 19 satellites and we want to somehow have people interact with sound and with the trajectories of these satellites in an interesting way," says Klimoski. "The satellites are collecting data streams. That doesn’t really lend itself to good representation, so we had to think of a new creative way to do it." The firm worked with Shane Myrbeck, a sound artist and acoustic engineer at the firm Arup to assign each of the satellites its own sound—anything from water trickling to leaves rustling to deep tonal noises. Myrbeck then placed an array of speakers around the center of the space and programmed them to play the sounds in such a way that the visitors feel like they are zipping past them. Inspired by the way a conch shell conveys the sound of the sea, the building—made up of 72 perforated aluminum panels, each measuring six feet wide by 25 feet across—is designed to mitigate outside sounds and amplify the sounds of space. Of course, those sounds are just sonic interpretations of the orbiting spacecrafts—which themselves are silent and largely invisible from Earth. The timing is interpretive as well: a satellite that would typically take 90 minutes to complete an orbit is condensed down to five to create a whirling, immersive sensation. So while the installation does give visitors a sense of satellite's trajectory, don't count on a completely accurate experience. The point, as Klimoski puts it, is to create a sense of amazement that these satellites are spinning in orbit all around us in outer space, even if we can't see them. "We wanted to make that world tangible," he says. The Orbit Pavilion will be at the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California until this summer (exact date TBD), when it will move to the Huntington Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Brad Schmett, of Brad Schmett Real Estate Group and Keller Williams Realty announced today that the 10th Annual WildLights at the Living Desert Zoo in Palm Desert scheduled for November 23-December 24, on select nights from 6 PM to 9 PM will bring in luxury home buyers looking for family homes and estates that surround the breathtaking and pristine area on the south side of the Coachella Valley. More than 750,000 twinkling lights illuminate the park creating a magical and stunning holiday aura. One of the favorites is the Tunnel of Lights where guests can take a walk under a canopy of brilliant blinking and flashing lights all set to favorite holiday music tunes. Taking a ride on the trackless train or riding the magnificent, old-fashioned carousel are other favorite activities that guests enjoy. Campfires, hot toddies, hot chocolate, and plenty of delicious gourmet goodies are also on hand making an evening that is truly impossible to forget. Schmett observed, “WildLights is one of our signature holiday events in the Coachella Valley. Listening to live music next to a campfire, and enjoying our favorite hot beverage under a brilliant canopy of stars reminds us of why so many of us choose to call Palm Desert and La Quinta home. The crisp night air and the peace and serenity of the desert underscore its beauty on every level. My team and I know that we will be busy during the weeks of WildLights since this event is a longtime favorite.” Santa Claus always shows up for the children, and there is plenty to do for everyone during the evening. Tickets may be purchased online or at the door. For more information on the Annual WildLights at the Living Desert Zoo and Botanical Gardens visit http://www.livingdesert.org/event/wildlights. To find out more about investing in Palm Desert real estate visit http://palmdesertrealestateinfo.com. About Luxury Homes by Keller Williams: Luxury Homes by Keller Williams – La Quinta is an exclusive, elite and sophisticated group of real estate consultants raising the bar for service in the La Quinta and greater Palm Springs real estate market.

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