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RICHMOND, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Tredegar Corporation (NYSE:TG) plans to release financial results for the first quarter of 2017 on May 2, 2017. The Company also announced that it will hold its 2017 annual meeting of shareholders on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. EDT at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, Virginia. Tredegar will webcast its annual meeting. To register to listen to the meeting and view the slide presentation, go to the Company’s website, www.tredegar.com, and select the “Webcast of Shareholders Meeting” link on the Presentations page of the Investors section of the website. A replay of the meeting will be available through August 17, 2017. Tredegar Corporation is a manufacturer of plastic films and aluminum extrusions. A global company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, Tredegar had 2016 sales of $828 million. With approximately 3,200 employees, the company operates manufacturing facilities in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.


News Article | February 8, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden has three new welcome additions - Malayan tiger cubs. The three tigers were born on Friday and were unfortunately separated from their mum Cinta as the tigress' maternal instincts did not kick in. The maternal instincts not kicking in posed to be a threat for the three Malayan cubs and vets worried that they would be unable to survive as they could not stay warms without Cinta's body heat. Therefore, fearing a drop in the tigers' body temperature, the zoo took the call to take away the three cubs from the den. The tigress' maternal instincts not kicking in is not uncommon say the zoo staff who are caring for the three cubs in a nursery. "It's not uncommon for first-time tiger moms not to know what to do. They can be aggressive and even harm or kill the cubs. Nursery staff is keeping them warm and feeding them every three hours," revealed Mike Dulaney, curator of mammals and vice coordinator of the Malayan Tiger SSP. The three cubs will looked after in the zoo's nursery till they do not require care. Then the trio will be shifted to the Cat Canyon. The zoo authorities estimate that this process may happen by early spring. However, the three cubs will not be introduced again to their mum Cinta as she will not be able to recognize the tigers as being her own. This is because of the lengthy separation between the mother and the cubs. The cubs' mother Cinta is a three-year-old tigress and holds the distinction of being the second-most valuable female in the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, owing to her genes. The father of the cubs is 15-year-old Jalil, who is the third-most genetically valuable male of the species. In 2009, Jalil and the tigress Hutan gave birth to four male, which are now in other zoos. The combination of Jalil and Cinta gives the three cubs a terrific lineage. The cubs will contribute to a genetic diversity that is much required in the context of when they begin to breed. The breeding recommendations are usually given by the Malayan tiger Species Survival Plan (SSP). The SSP manages the health of the species in the 28 authorized zoos that are enlisted to care for the Malayan tiger. The Malayan tiger is one of the most endangered species in the world with less than 500 estimated to remain. The destruction of their habitat and environment are to be blamed for the species' dwindling numbers. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

As political turmoil and conflict rock Ukraine, the country’s main scientific organization is in a bind. In January,  Parliament passed a law to modernize the ailing National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU). Yet an austerity budget imposed around the same time makes this impossible to achieve — at least this year. The resulting cuts to science funding threaten the jobs of young researchers in particular, who are best poised to revitalize the country’s failing economy. “We have an extraordinarily high number of potential young scientists who are ready to work for the welfare of the country,” says Liliya Hrynevych, who chairs the Ukrainian Parliament’s Committee on Science and Education and voted in favour of the modernizing law. “But without setting priorities for science and research, it will be impossible for Ukraine to become a strong and wealthy European nation.” The academy employs some 20,000 scientists across 120 research institutes. On 26 November, Parliament began to debate a “law of Ukraine on scientific and technical activity”, in an attempt to streamline and strengthen the organization, which was founded in the Soviet era. Long deemed outdated and resistant to modernization, the academy uses an opaque system to award funding, and many of its members are elderly, not least the 97-year-old metallurgist Boris Paton, who has run the NASU for decades. The law stipulates the creation of a science advisory council that includes foreign specialists, and an independent grant-giving agency. All NASU institutes will undergo an external evaluation to examine their productivity and efficiency, and overall, government science spending must increase from a current 0.3% of gross domestic product to at least 1.7% by fiscal year 2017 — near the European Union average. But before the law took effect, Ukraine passed its 2016 austerity budget, in the wake of widespread closure of mines and factories, inflation, debt and currency devaluation. The budget allocates a meagre 2.05 billion hryvnia (US$76 million) to the NASU — about 12% less than in 2015, continuing a trend of decline (see ‘Ailing academy’). The cutbacks are irreconcilable with the science law, says Hrynevych, who is campaigning in Parliament for a budget revision after the first quarter of 2016. The budget will leave the academy with scarcely enough to cover the scant salaries (about US$200 per month on average) paid to its administrative staff and scientists. “We won’t be able to buy any new equipment this year, and purchase of consumables will need to be reduced to a minimum,” says Anatoly Zagorodny, director of the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics in Kiev and a vice-president of the academy. The fresh cuts, he says, will also force institutes to reduce staff — in some circumstances, by more than one-third — and to discontinue many areas of research, even though science is crucial to economic recovery, he adds. Young scientists are the least protected by existing labour laws and so will feel the brunt of the job cuts, says Irina Yehorchenko, a research fellow at the NASU’s Institute of Mathematics in Kiev. She and some of her colleagues launched a petition in December calling on the country’s president, Petro Poroshenko, to save Ukrainian science. “I, for one, might be able to find a postdoc position abroad,” says Oleksandr Skorokhod, a cell biologist at the NASU Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics in Kiev who is chair of the academy’s Council of Young Scientists. “But I’d much rather stay and try to change the bad state of affairs in my country.” Ukrainian science has struggled to recover from Russia’s annexation of the Crimea peninsula in 2014. General consensus in the international community is that Crimea is still part of the Ukraine — the United Nations General Assembly declared invalid a March 2014 referendum in which voters in Crimea approved the peninsula’s secession from Ukraine. But all 22 Crimean institutes formerly run by the NASU are now under Russian control, and only a few of their 1,320 staff members have relocated to Ukraine-controlled territory. The academy lost access to its only research ship, the RV Professor Vodianytsky, three astronomical observatories in Nauchny, Katsiveli and Yevpatoria and the 204-year-old Nikitsky Botanical Garden near Yalta, on the Black Sea shore. The Ukrainian government, moreover, expects scientists in Ukraine to cut all ties with colleagues who stayed on the peninsula, says Hrynevych, because any collaboration would be viewed as legitimizing the Russian occupation. The armed conflict with pro-Russian militants in eastern Ukraine is also causing problems for scientists, especially in the country’s Donbas region. Some 12,000 scientists and university lecturers there — about 60% of the former staff of 26 research institutes and universities in the province — have moved to safe institutions in Kiev and elsewhere. But many evacuating scientists left behind equipment or lost irreplaceable research material. Marine, environmental and climate studies in the Black Sea region, mining-related geology and a variety of archaeological and historical research have all been hit hard, says Zagorodny.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— TOUR TRAVEL by ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING and Runners Club Association invites people to the 7th edition of Wizz Air Cluj-Napoca Marathon, one of the highest level sports competitions and the largest running event in Transylvania. The Marathon will be organized in Cluj-Napoca, Romania on April 9, 2017. Participants can pick from several categories of races. The main objective of this event is to bring together professional or amateur runners from all over the world, becoming a mark of the European sport city Cluj-Napoca. The Marathon is organized annually by Runners Club Association, which seeks to extensively stimulate running as part of a healthy life. “The marathon is an important event for the city of Cluj-Napoca and for Transylvania, being a high technical competition that reunites athletes from Romania and from abroad. Wizz Air Cluj-Napoca Marathon is also a social event that brings together people of all ages who have a passion for sports. Cluj-Napoca deserves a marathon to define it as a European sports city and we hope that together with the running community to further develop the event, since it was designed from the very beginning to transform itself into a brand of our city and to become as famous as the other European marathons. This year we expect more than 5000 competitors to race in one of the four technical challenges - marathon, half marathon, marathon relay and a 10k cross - as well as at the two free races open to beginners: the kids’ cross and Crosul BT, a 5k cross”, declared Horatiu Morar, president at Runners Club Association. Tourists can profit from this occasion to discover the dynamic atmosphere and historical landmarks of Cluj-Napoca, such as Avram Iancu and Matei Corvin Squares, the “Alexandru Borza” Botanical Garden, the Transylvania Ethnographic Museum and The National Ethnographic Park “Romulus Vuia”, Lucian Blaga National Theater and Cluj-Napoca Central Park. More information about TOUR TRAVEL by ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING TOUR TRAVEL by ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING is a premier tour operator owned by ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING LTD, based in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING LTD is a Romanian company which provides business and management consultancy to the highest quality standards. ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING LTD was founded in 2003 and since then has been dynamically involving by offering a wide range of services, from business and management consultancy to governmental, structural and international funds consultancy and feasibility studies. TOUR TRAVEL by ODAS GLOBAL CONSULTING mission statement is "to offer you and your family a safe and memorable experience, an unforgettable journey". For more information regarding this exclusive tour or to research tour options, you can always contact our professional team at: +40744 872 835 or office@discoveringtransylvania.ro. For more information, please visit http://www.discoveringtransylvania.ro


News Article | August 31, 2016
Site: phys.org

Bernd Blossey, associate professor of natural resources, has a better idea: Let bugs do the work. Blossey is nearing the end of a research program that has identified a leaf beetle, Galerucella birmanica, that feasts on water chestnuts in its native China, as the perfect predator to help clear New York's waters. Water chestnut (Trapa natans) is native to Europe, Asia and Africa. It was introduced to North America through the Botanic Gardens in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the 1870s. Since then, water chestnut has spread across the Northeast, into Canada and as far south as Virginia. With no natural predators, water chestnut overtakes its environment, forming floating mats of vegetation that make rivers and lakes impassable for boats and swimmers, and prevents light and oxygen from reaching plants and creatures below. If the beetle proves to be an effective predator against water chestnut, the benefit could be felt in millions of dollars in savings for wildlife agencies and provide a more sustainable approach to using herbicide to knock back the invasive plant. In a carefully controlled, quarantined environment, Blossey and his research team have found that G. birmanica is "very, very specific" in eating water chestnut plants and very little else. Blossey obtained the leaf beetles from the Wuhan Botanical Garden in Hubei province, China. "We had to get permission from the Chinese authorities to bring them out and the U.S. authorities to bring them in," Blossey said. "We've tried 50 different plant species, and the insects are as specific as we'd hoped they were. We're really, really pleased with the progress we have made." Water chestnut is found throughout much of the Finger Lakes, central New York and tributaries to Lake Ontario. The species has invaded eastern coastal states and, Blossey warns, could be ready for a rapid westward expansion through the Great Lakes human and cargo transportation system. Millions of dollars have been spent to thwart water chestnut's spread. Each year $500,000 is spent on eradication efforts on Lake Champlain alone. This year, the Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management received a $750,000 grant from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for hand pulling of the invasive plant. Blossey also studies invasiveness in plant species generally. Very few introduced plant species become problematic: Of all plant species moved outside their natural habitats, only 10 percent become established at all, and only 1 percent become invasive. In 1995, Blossey and Rolf Nötzold, then of the international Institute of Biological Control, European Station, proposed a hypothesis to explain why some species become invasive while others don't: the evolution of increased competitive ability hypothesis. "Some of the species that are serious invaders outside the home range are hammered inside the home range by predators or diseases. If you have a lot of natural enemies, you develop a lot of defenses. So when they leave the home range, they have less competition and they thrive," Blossey said. This isn't the first time Blossey has helped address an out-of-control invasive species through biological control. In 1992 he led a team that tested insects as biological controls for the invasive purple loosestrife, a European wetland plant that has spread throughout North America. The team gained federal and state approval to release four insects that attack the plant: two leaf beetles and two weevils, which jointly go after the plant's roots, leaves and flowers. Another project, on which Blossey has worked for 18 years with collaborators in Europe and Rhode Island, involves controlling common reed, Phragmites australis, another wetland plant invader. The team is investigating stem-eating moths, which are "almost 100 percent specific" to the invasive plant, he said. As for the water chestnuts, there are still some questions to be answered and additional tests that Blossey plans to run early next spring. If all goes well, he would then submit a petition to a U.S. Department of Agriculture oversight group, asking for permission to release the insects. "We hope to release them in 2018," Blossey said. "That's an incredibly quick timeline, but we've had a good work plan, and the insects were really, really cooperative." Blossey's work on water chestnuts has been supported in part by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation through the New York Invasive Species Research Institute at Cornell University. Explore further: New study in US and Europe shows how invasive plant species fare better than natives


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Virtual reality gear is still clunky and expensive, but hardware makers are taking small steps to fix at least one of those problems. Enter the MSI VR One backpack, which helps people to move around more easily in VR by untethering them from a stationary PC. Yes, it's still expensive at about $1,900 and it looks just a little silly. (OK, very silly.) Also, you may want to hold off before buying this backpack, since new wireless VR add-ons are expected to come out later this year. Also on the podcast, we hit on Verizon's latest 5G network trials and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden's algorithm-powered drainage system. The 3:59 gives you bite-size news and analysis about the top stories of the day, brought to you by the CNET News team in New York and producer Bryan VanGelder. Check out the extended shows on YouTube. You can't look cool wearing a VR backpack (The 3:59, Ep. 183) Your browser does not support the audio element.


News Article | March 25, 2016
Site: phys.org

Biologists at UC San Diego and in China found that an Asian species of honey bee can produce different types of vibrational "stop signals" when attacked by giant Asian hornets. These signals have different effects depending upon type of danger and the context. A bee delivers a stop signal by giving another bee a brief, vibrational pulse, usually through a head-butt. "Surprisingly, this signal encodes the level of danger in its vibrational frequency, its pitch, and the danger context through the duration of each pulse," said James Nieh, a professor of biology at UC San Diego who headed the research team., which was also led by Ken Tan, a professor at Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Science. The scientists report their discovery, which they say is the most sophisticated form of alarm signaling found in a social insect, in a paper published this week in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. Six years ago, Nieh discovered that foragers of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, when attacked at a food source, will return to the nest and deliver stop signals to nestmates recruiting for the dangerous food source. These signals were known to inhibit recruitment, the famous waggle dance of the honey bee, but researchers did not know what triggered stop signals. "Stop signals are usually delivered by a sender butting her head into a recipient. Understanding that these signals can be triggered by danger and reduce recruitment for dangerous food therefore made sense," explained Nieh. Nieh next wanted to find out if other honey bee species also used stop signals. He and his collaborators at the Chinese Academy of Science and Eastern Bee Research Institute in Yunnan Province conducted their experiments at Yunnan Agricultural University using the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, which occurs throughout southern and eastern Asia, from India to China and Japan. The scientists said this honey bee species is an excellent model for studying the effects of predator threats because A. cerana is attacked by multiple species of giant hornets, which pose a threat according to hornet body size. They studied the world's largest hornet, the "yak-killer" Vespa mandarinia and a smaller, but still formidable hornet, Vespa velutina. Both hornet species are natural enemies of A. cerana. These hornets attack foraging bees and bee nests, and the scientists therefore set up their experiments to see if bees would produce stop signals in both situations. "We hypothesized that bigger predators would pose a bigger threat and would change stop signaling, perhaps by producing more signals when attacked by a large predator," Nieh said. "However, we were very surprised to find that these Asian bees not only produced more stop signals, they also produced different kinds of stop signals." Attacked foragers reduced their waggle dancing and produced stop signals that increased in pitch according to predator size. The larger and more dangerous predator triggered higher pitched stop signals that were more effective at stopping waggle dancing than the lower pitched stop signals triggered by the smaller and less dangerous predator. In addition, guard bees and returning foragers attacked at the nest entrance produced longer duration stop signals to warn nestmates about the imminent danger outside. "Our experiments showed that these different types of stop signals elicited different and appropriate responses. Bees attacked at food sources by bigger hornets produced a kind of stop signal that more effectively inhibited recruitment," said Nieh. "Bees attacked at the nest entrance produced another kind of stop signal that inhibited foragers from exiting the nest and being exposed to the danger outside." According to Nieh, "this is the first demonstration of such sophisticated inhibitory signaling or alarm signaling in an insect." Previously, such referential alarm signals had only been reported in vertebrates like birds and primates.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

On the occasion of this year's Art Basel in Miami Beach, the BMW Art Car by John Baldessari celebrated its world premiere on November 30. The 19th vehicle of the BMW Art Car Collection was designed by the American master of conceptual art and revealed in the presence of the artist himself, Ludwig Willisch, President and CEO, BMW of North America, and Jens Marquardt, Director BMW Motorsport, at the Botanical Garden of Miami Beach. John Baldessari's BMW M6 GTLM, a race car with a speed of up to 300 km/h, depending on the race track, and 585 hp, will be on public display until the closing of Art Basel. "Considering the car as an icon of contemporary life, my concept for the BMW Art Car turned out playfully satirical, but it also highlights some of the trademark ideas that I use. So you can say, the BMW Art Car is definitely a typical Baldessari and the fastest artwork I ever created!" - John Baldessari Following the 40-year tradition of BMW Art Cars, John Baldessari's "rolling sculpture" will then prove itself on the race track of Rolex 24 at DAYTONA on January 28 and 29, 2017. Bill Auberlen (US), Alexander Sims (GB), Augusto Farfus (BR) and Bruno Spengler (CA) will take turns in driving the BMW Art Car next year. Since 1975, international artists, such as Alexander Calder, Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons, have been creating BMW Art Cars on the basis of contemporary BMW automobiles. For further information, please visit: http://www.press.bmwgroup.com


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Fiona, a prematurely-born Nile hippo calf, is making excellent progress at her home at The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden after the staff from a local children’s hospital stepped in to help. After her birth in January, Fiona wouldn’t take any milk, causing her to become severely dehydrated. The staff from the Vascular Access Team (VAT) from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital came to the zoo’s aid and administered specialist IVF equipment to help the little hippo survive. She is now gaining weight, walking and taking her milk


News Article | August 30, 2016
Site: www.treehugger.com

Many of us tend to think of conservation efforts as a large-scale project that a big organization or perhaps a government agency might undertake. But that's not always the case. One only has to look at the courageous examples out there -- the man who single-handedly saved a species of snail, or the man that courted a rare whooping crane for three years in an effort to get her to lay eggs -- to see that sometimes, one person can make a huge difference in ensuring the survival of an endangered species. San Francisco-based Tim Wong is yet another one of these inspiring individuals who didn't wait for someone else to act. Twenty-eight-year-old Wong, who is an aquatic biologist at the California Academy of Sciences, has also been passionate about butterflies since he was young, capturing caterpillars and breeding them into butterflies in his spare time. Well, Wong has parlayed that childhood passion into an one-man effort saving San Francisco's population of California pipevine swallowtail (Battus philenor hirsuta) butterflies from disappearing completely. According to Vox, the exquisite butterflies have made the San Francisco area their habitat for centuries -- that is, until it started developing rapidly last century. It's now rare to see these butterflies in the city. Motivated by their plight, Wong researched the species' habits and favourite food -- and discovered that they feed exclusively on the California pipevine (Aristolochia californica) in caterpillar form, a deciduous vine that is now equally rare in the city. Armed with this knowledge, Wong then set out to grow this vine in his own backyard -- but it proved difficult to find in the wild. He says: "Finally, I was able to find this plant in the San Francisco Botanical Garden [in Golden Gate Park]. And they allowed me to take a few clippings of the plant." Wong then set out to build a hospitable habitat for the California pipevine swallowtail butterflies in his backyard. To populate it, he was able to get the cooperation of a handful of homeowners who could source him with 20 initial caterpillars. Wong explains: It seems that Wong's diligent efforts have paid off in the last four years. Last year, he was able to breed "thousands" of caterpillars which were transferred over to the Botanical Garden. What is remarkable is that while California pipevine swallowtail repopulation efforts have worked in nearby counties like Sonoma and Santa Cruz, Wong's project is the first to truly succeed in San Francisco since the 1980s. Wong attributes the success to careful research and constant care of the habitat he's built in his backyard, showing that habitat restoration does make a huge difference in the survival of a species. And while he says that DIY conservation efforts aren't for everyone, he points out that we can all do our small part in the greater scheme of caring for our planet: See more over at Timothy Wong's Instagram and the California Pipevine Swallowtail Project. [Via: Vox]

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