Woburn, MA, United States

Boston Applied Technologies, Inc.

www.bostonati.com
Woburn, MA, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 374.87K | Year: 2013

Microwave technologies have found a broad range of and growing applications, especially in the area of communications. Many microwave tunable devices are bulky and incompatible with RF semiconductor IC technology. The slow tuning response speeds, high material losses, and device noise at higher frequencies have also limited their widespread applications.Recent advances in processing complex oxide and multiferroic thin films present the opportunity for state-of-the-art microwave components. These technologies open the way for establishing electrically tuned ferromagnetic RF resonance devices with reduced bias fields, faster tuning speed, and minimized device size. During Phase I, Boston Applied Technologies Incorporated (BATi) together with University of Minnesota (UMN) have been working diligently on the fabrication and evaluation of multiferroic heterostructures and device designs and simulations. In this Phase II proposal, BATi and UMN propose to continue our efforts on developing and further optimizing high quality multiferroic thin film heterostructures through nano-engineering of interlayers. A prototype of isolator operating at frequencies above 10 GHz, exhibiting low insertion loss, and tunable with moderate electric fields will be fabricated and evaluated.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

In this proposal, Boston Applied Technologies, Incorporated (BATi) together with University of Minnesota proposes to develop a high quality epitaxially grown multiferroic thin film heterostructure through a simple wet chemical route, which has been demonstrated the capability of growing high quality multilayer films through nano-engineering and introducing proper buffer layers. The feasibility of developing of an electrically tunable RF isolator utilizing of the magnetoelectric coupling effect of the heterostructure will be evaluated.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

Boston Applied Technologies, Inc (BATi), together with Kent State University (KSU), proposes to develop a high sensitivity infrared (IR) imaging sensor without cooling, which covers a broad band from near infrared (NIR) to mid-infrared (mid-IR). It is based on a specific transparent functional material developed at BATi that has excellent pyroelectric effect, over strong absorption at NIR, mid-IR and long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavebands, perfect transmittance in visible wavelength. With this material, the intensity variation of an incident NIR, Mid-IR or/and LWIR radiation from a warm object can be transferred into intensity variation of a visible beam by a smart use of liquid crystal, which can be detected by a commercial CCD or CMOS camera. Of the most important, the collaboration with Dr. Quan Li's group at The Glenn H. Brown Liquid Crystal Institute at KSU, which is renowned for their pioneer research and development on liquid crystal, will further leverage and ensure the success of the proposed program. Compared to existing thermal imaging techniques, this invention will generate an uncooled IR imaging sensor with unprecedented low costs, high resolution, high sensitivity, low mass, and low power consumption, which is very important to NASA's planetary exploration projects and other applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: Single-point spectroscopic analysis of flame emission and blackbody radiation has been successfully used for jet engine diagnosis such as measuring temperature and specie concentration. An obvious need is to extend such a diagnostic mean to 2-D and 3-D scales. This SBIR project is aimed to develop a passive infrared imaging spectroscope suitable for jet engine diagnosis. Key features include multi-chamber enclosure for applicability to harsh environment (up to 4000F), electro-optical tunable filter for fast measurement (>1.0 kHz), large acceptant angle for near-distance imaging (>40 degree) and wide spectral range (workable range from 600nm to 6000nm). In phase I, we will physically build a prototype imaging spectroscope working at SWIR (900nm to 1700nm) and test it under temperature from 600F to 4000F. It is anticipated that the proposed scope can collect big portion of IR spectrum from large field. The developed instrument will perform spatially resolved measurements of temperature, species concentration, fuel/air ratios, and heat release of gas turbine combustion. BENEFIT: This device can be directly used for fire studies and combustion research, such as used for the development of military and commercial turbine and afterburner combustion processes and active control for flight systems. A significant application is precision thermograph for many high temperature processes in gas turbine engines, afterburner sections, internal combustion engines and boilers. They are also useful means for kilns, the steel and iron industries to monitor temperatures throughout the product making process. The proposed hyperspectral scope itself can be used for military surveillance, firefight department and homeland security.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2011

This project aims at developing a non focal plane laser protection system consisted of single crystal plates with hidden phase gratings, which can be revealed with exposure to strong laser pulse, and a novel optical shutter based device that follows. The protection system is large in aperture, broad in transparent window (400 nm to 2000 nm) and in field of view, and wavelength-insensitive. The protection system is capable of changing from a high transmission state (60%) to a very low transmission state (35 C 40 dB) to block light pulse within short time scale (subnanosecond). Combining phase gratings and charge compensation technique, the unique protection system has ample transmission of ambient visible light and of high optical quality in off-state, without notably degrading normal (human) vision. In the entire interesting visible waveband in this topic, even higher transmittance is anticipated with efforts on deposition of AR coatings. When harmful radiation is no longer incident, the device can recover to a high transmission state in a short time scale (microseconds) so that the users vision is not interrupted or significantly degraded after exposure. The BATis expertise in ultrafast optics, photorefraction and material fabricating and processing will meet or exceed the requirements in performance of the proposed work.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.94K | Year: 2014

This proposal is to develop a non focal plane laser protection device for the Army and other DoD agencies. The device will be composed of single-crystal plates with hidden reflective/diffraction gratings, which can be revealed with exposure to strong pulsed or continuous laser, and a reversed-mode polymer-stabilized-cholesteric-texture (PSCT) light switch. This proposed device can change from a high transmission state (80%) to a very low transmission state (35 50 dB) to block strong light pulse or continuous within short time scale (subnanosecond). In the entire visible and NIR waveband, higher transmittance is anticipated with efforts on deposition of anti-reflective coatings. This protection device features large in aperture, broad in transparent window and in field of view, wavelength-insensitive, and fast in response.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based technologies, the x-y 2D imaging is usually taken at once, while the wavelength dimension is performed by tunable filters that are mounted in front of a monochrome IR camera. Several types of tunable filters are currently available, including mechanically tuned Fabry-Perot etalon (FP filter), liquid-crystal Lyot-Ohman filters and acousto-optic filters. However, these EO tuning technologies have some shortages, such as slow tuning speed, bulky design, limited working band and small aperture. Boston Applied Technologies, Inc. (BATi) proposes a unique remote sensing system which is based on a tunable filter with under millisecond tuning time for high speed detection of gas concentration. The core part, tunable filter, of the proposed system is made of patented OptoCeramic® material. The system features high speed, wide spectral range from visible to MWIR, low cost, light weight, big aperture, and robust.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2015

In this SBIR project Boston Applied Technologies, Inc. (BATi) proposes a unique optical imager for remote gas sensing. Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. The core of the proposed imager is a high speed electro-optic tunable filter based on patented OptoCeramic® material developed by BATi. This compact passive imager covers a large portion of mid-wave infrared. An innovative technical approach is proposed to achieve narrow bandwidth at the same time. The successful combination of wide tuning range and sharp passing bands makes the image have excellent ability of detecting critical gas species such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane and water vapor simultaneously at high precision. The imager also features high speed, big aperture, large angle of view, robust, light weight, and low cost.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.97K | Year: 2011

This SBIR project is aimed at developing a novel thermometry technology with upconverting phosphors for temperature measurement in NASA's high-enthalpy wind tunnels. Conventional thermographic phosphors require illumination by ultraviolet (UV) light and emit light at visible wavelengths. However, UV excitation is problematic in many large-scale facilities because it demands very expensive UV-quality windows and the UV light can be absorbed and scattered by gas species and particles in the flow path. Upconversion phosphors have been previously developed in our company and the temperature-sensing effect up to around 1000ºC with excellent sensitivity was demonstrated. A major part of this Phase I efforts will be directed towards applying these thermographic phosphors to a surface coating on a model and tested in a wind tunnel environment. The objective is to develop new surface coatings that are aerodynamically smooth, very durable, require near IR excitation and enable surface temperatures in the range of 300 K to 1500 K to be measured.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.82K | Year: 2010

Infrared (IR) detection approaches have required significant development of highly sensitive arrays for a wide range of area. How to engineer materials to achieve high IR sensitivity and be deposited onto lenses, goggles, or other substrates are challenging and important to military and commercial applications. For many military missions, a cost-effective, ultra-compact, and efficient infrared detection is desired. High efficiency upconverting films have the potential to generate visible emissions for direct IR detection. We have successfully shown in Phase I that our nanostructured upconverting glass ceramic films were capable of meeting the needs of direct detection of multiple IR wavelengths at low costs. Efforts to further increase the up-conversion efficiency and to implement additional wavelength detection ranges will be conducted during Phase II. BATi is confident that the encouraging results achieved in Phase I will turn into a great commercial success in the next stage.

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