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Woburn, MA, United States

Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2015

In this SBIR project Boston Applied Technologies, Inc. (BATi) proposes a unique optical imager for remote gas sensing. Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. The core of the proposed imager is a high speed electro-optic tunable filter based on patented OptoCeramic® material developed by BATi. This compact passive imager covers a large portion of mid-wave infrared. An innovative technical approach is proposed to achieve narrow bandwidth at the same time. The successful combination of wide tuning range and sharp passing bands makes the image have excellent ability of detecting critical gas species such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane and water vapor simultaneously at high precision. The imager also features high speed, big aperture, large angle of view, robust, light weight, and low cost.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2010

For remote sensing of laser/lidar technology and global environment monitoring applications, the pulsed coherent Doppler lidars are of considerable contemporary interest as an effective tool. At present, the coherent 2-ƒÝm laser radar has been used to replaced CO2 gas laser (10.6-ƒÝm) for its higher spatial and velocity resolution. Considering the commercial 2 micron laser systems are complex and expensive, Boston Applied Technologies proposes a new laser gain medium by a revolutionary ceramic laser material technology where the host ceramic is highly transparent, active and possess electro-optic character itself. By doping with specified rare earth ions, it is easily to reach the 2-ƒÝm emission. The resultant laser transmitter will be an all solid-state, diode-pumped, room-temperature operation, 2 micron laser system producing laser pulses of 2 to 200 mJ at 10 to 200 Hz repetition rate. This all diode-pumped laser will be compact, reliable, cost-effective and also capable of operating in aircraft and planetary environmental extremes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.82K | Year: 2010

Infrared (IR) detection approaches have required significant development of highly sensitive arrays for a wide range of area. How to engineer materials to achieve high IR sensitivity and be deposited onto lenses, goggles, or other substrates are challenging and important to military and commercial applications. For many military missions, a cost-effective, ultra-compact, and efficient infrared detection is desired. High efficiency upconverting films have the potential to generate visible emissions for direct IR detection. We have successfully shown in Phase I that our nanostructured upconverting glass ceramic films were capable of meeting the needs of direct detection of multiple IR wavelengths at low costs. Efforts to further increase the up-conversion efficiency and to implement additional wavelength detection ranges will be conducted during Phase II. BATi is confident that the encouraging results achieved in Phase I will turn into a great commercial success in the next stage.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.97K | Year: 2011

This SBIR project is aimed at developing a novel thermometry technology with upconverting phosphors for temperature measurement in NASA's high-enthalpy wind tunnels. Conventional thermographic phosphors require illumination by ultraviolet (UV) light and emit light at visible wavelengths. However, UV excitation is problematic in many large-scale facilities because it demands very expensive UV-quality windows and the UV light can be absorbed and scattered by gas species and particles in the flow path. Upconversion phosphors have been previously developed in our company and the temperature-sensing effect up to around 1000ºC with excellent sensitivity was demonstrated. A major part of this Phase I efforts will be directed towards applying these thermographic phosphors to a surface coating on a model and tested in a wind tunnel environment. The objective is to develop new surface coatings that are aerodynamically smooth, very durable, require near IR excitation and enable surface temperatures in the range of 300 K to 1500 K to be measured.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

In this proposal, Boston Applied Technologies, Incorporated (BATi) together with University of Minnesota proposes to develop a high quality epitaxially grown multiferroic thin film heterostructure through a simple wet chemical route, which has been demonstrated the capability of growing high quality multilayer films through nano-engineering and introducing proper buffer layers. The feasibility of developing of an electrically tunable RF isolator utilizing of the magnetoelectric coupling effect of the heterostructure will be evaluated.

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