Borås, Sweden
Borås, Sweden

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Strandvik B.,Karolinska Institutet | Lundqvist-Persson C.,Skaraborg Institutet | Lundqvist-Persson C.,Lund University | Sabel K.-G.,Boras Childrens Hospital
OCL - Oleagineux Corps Gras Lipides | Year: 2011

In a cohort of premature infants, consecutively included in the study at birth and followed to 18 months of age, the neonatal status of essential fatty acids and longchain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) were investigated and correlated to the development at 40 and 44 weeks gestational age and at 3, 6, 10 and 18 months corrected age. The diet reported by the mothers contained low EFA, 98% had an intake < 1 energy% of n-3 fatty acids. Fatty acid analyses were performed in early breast milk and in mothers' and infants' plasma phospholipids early after birth and at gestational age 40 and 44 weeks. The development of the infants were assessed with Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (BNBAS) at 40 and 44 weeks and with Bayley's Scales of Infant Development (Second Edition (BSID-II) at 3, 6, 10 and 18 months corrected age. At 40 weeks and 3 months videotapes were made of the infants' spontaneous motor behavior to assess the quality of their general movements. Adjustments for confounding background factors were made in multiple logistic regression analyses and mothers' education had the highest impact of the background variables. At all ages tested the n-6 fatty acid concentrations, expressed as total concentrations, LA, AA or as ratios to n-3 fatty acids in breast milk and early plasma phospholipids were negatively associated with development. Positive associations with LCPUFA, especially DHA, were mainly found after 10 months of age. Both mental and motor developments had similar pattern of associations, fatty acid concentrations and background factors explaining 20-50% (R 2) of the developmental scores. This was only an observational study, and it cannot be excluded that the highly negative influence of n-6 fatty acids was an effect of the low intake of n-3 fatty acids, which in the context of the changes generally seen in Western diet imply urgent need for larger studies.


Ntoumani E.,Boras Childrens Hospital | Strandvik B.,Karolinska Institutet | Sabel K.-G.,Boras Childrens Hospital
Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids | Year: 2013

Nervonic acid is important for white matter development and its incorporation increases rapidly in the last trimester, but few studies focus on this fatty acid. Other mother's milk, usually after term delivery, is often used for premature infants, whose mothers cannot breastfeed. The fatty acid (FA) concentrations were analyzed by gas chromatography in 12 samples of donor human milk (DHM) from five mothers, and compared to milk from 42 mothers delivering preterm infants. Fat, lactose and protein contents were compared. Nervonic acid showed sevenfold higher concentrations and LCPUFA 90% higher concentrations in premature milk compared to DHM. Linoleic acid was found in 43% higher concentrations in DHM than in premature milk. The fat and protein contents were lower in DHM. Our results suggest that studies are warranted to investigate if DHM given to premature infants may require supplementation of nervonic acid, and not only LCPUFA, protein and minerals. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Strandvik B.,Karolinska Institutet | Ntoumani E.,Boras Childrens Hospital | Lundqvist-Persson C.,Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development | Lundqvist-Persson C.,Lund University | Sabel K.-G.,Boras Childrens Hospital
Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids | Year: 2016

Myelination is important perinatally and highly dependent on long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, nowadays often supplemented, inhibit oleic acid synthesis. Using data from a premature cohort, we studied if nervonic, lignoceric and oleic acids correlated to growth and early development up to 18 months corrected age. Small for gestational age infants had lower concentrations than infants appropriate for gestational age. Only oleic acid was negatively correlated to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Oleic and lignoceric acids correlated to social interaction at one month, and nervonic acid to mental, psychomotor and behavioral development at 6, 10 and 18 months, also when adjusted for several confounders. Negative association between oleic acid and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids suggests inhibition of delta-9 desaturase, and nervonic acids divergent correlation to lignoceric and oleic acids suggests different metabolism in neonatal period. Our results may have implications for the supplementation of premature infants. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Sabel K.-G.,Boras Childrens Hospital | Sabel K.-G.,Karolinska Institutet | Sabel K.-G.,Gothenburg University | Sabel K.-G.,Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development | And 16 more authors.
Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids | Year: 2012

The objective of this study was to investigate any association between infants' early development and PUFA concentrations in early breast milk and infants' plasma phospholipids at 44 weeks gestational age. Fifty-one premature infants were included. The quality of general movement was assessed at 3 months, and motor, mental and behavioral development at 3, 6, 10 and 18 months corrected age using Bayley's Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II).Linoleic acid, the major n-6/n-3 FA ratios, Mead acid and the EFA deficiency index in early breast milk were negatively associated with development up to 18 months of age. DHA and AA, respectively, in infants' plasma phospholipids was positively, but the AA/DHA ratio negatively, associated with development from 6 to 18 months of age. Our data suggest that the commonly found high n-6 concentration in breast milk is associated with less favorable motor, mental and behavioral development up to 18 months of age. © 2012.


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet, Lund University and Boras Childrens Hospital
Type: | Journal: Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids | Year: 2016

Myelination is important perinatally and highly dependent on long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, nowadays often supplemented, inhibit oleic acid synthesis. Using data from a premature cohort, we studied if nervonic, lignoceric and oleic acids correlated to growth and early development up to 18 months corrected age. Small for gestational age infants had lower concentrations than infants appropriate for gestational age. Only oleic acid was negatively correlated to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Oleic and lignoceric acids correlated to social interaction at one month, and nervonic acid to mental, psychomotor and behavioral development at 6, 10 and 18 months, also when adjusted for several confounders. Negative association between oleic acid and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids suggests inhibition of delta-9 desaturase, and nervonic acids divergent correlation to lignoceric and oleic acids suggests different metabolism in neonatal period. Our results may have implications for the supplementation of premature infants.


PubMed | Boras Childrens Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids | Year: 2012

The objective of this study was to investigate any association between infants early development and PUFA concentrations in early breast milk and infants plasma phospholipids at 44 weeks gestational age. Fifty-one premature infants were included. The quality of general movement was assessed at 3 months, and motor, mental and behavioral development at 3, 6, 10 and 18 months corrected age using Bayleys Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II). Linoleic acid, the major n-6/n-3 FA ratios, Mead acid and the EFA deficiency index in early breast milk were negatively associated with development up to 18 months of age. DHA and AA, respectively, in infants plasma phospholipids was positively, but the AA/DHA ratio negatively, associated with development from 6 to 18 months of age. Our data suggest that the commonly found high n-6 concentration in breast milk is associated with less favorable motor, mental and behavioral development up to 18 months of age.

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