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Robina, Australia

The Bond University is a private not-for-profit university located in Robina, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Bond differs from other Australian universities as it schedules three semesters each year, commencing in January, May and September, allowing a six-semester degree to be completed in two years, instead of three, without increasing semester workloads. Wikipedia.


Burnout and intolerance of uncertainty have been linked to low job satisfaction and lower quality patient care. While resilience is related to these concepts, no study has examined these three concepts in a cohort of doctors. The objective of this study was to measure resilience, burnout, compassion satisfaction, personal meaning in patient care and intolerance of uncertainty in Australian general practice (GP) registrars. We conducted a paper-based cross-sectional survey of GP registrars in Australia from June to July 2010, recruited from a newsletter item or registrar education events. Survey measures included the Resilience Scale-14, a single-item scale for burnout, Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale, Personal Meaning in Patient Care scale, Intolerance of Uncertainty-12 scale, and Physician Response to Uncertainty scale. 128 GP registrars responded (response rate 90%). Fourteen percent of registrars were found to be at risk of burnout using the single-item scale for burnout, but none met the criteria for burnout using the ProQOL scale. Secondary traumatic stress, general intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety due to clinical uncertainty and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to patients were associated with being at higher risk of burnout, but sex, age, practice location, training duration, years since graduation, and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to physicians were not.Only ten percent of registrars had high resilience scores. Resilience was positively associated with compassion satisfaction and personal meaning in patient care. Resilience was negatively associated with burnout, secondary traumatic stress, inhibitory anxiety, general intolerance to uncertainty, concern about bad outcomes and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to patients. GP registrars in this survey showed a lower level of burnout than in other recent surveys of the broader junior doctor population in both Australia and overseas. Resilience was also lower than might be expected of a satisfied and professionally successful cohort. Source


Glasziou P.,Bond University | Houssami N.,University of Sydney
Preventive Medicine | Year: 2011

The history of breast cancer screening is littered with controversy. With 10 trials spanning 4 decades, we have a substantial body of evidence, but with different aims and flaws. Combined analysis of the intention-to-treat results gives an overall relative reduction in breast cancer mortality of 19% (95% CI 12%-26%), which, if adjusted for non-attendance gives an approximate 25% relative reduction for those who attend screening. However, given that 4% of all-cause mortality is due to breast cancer deaths, this translates into a less than 1% reduction in all-cause mortality. An emerging issue in interpretation is the improvements in treatment since these trials recruited women. Modern systemic therapy would have improved survival (models suggest between 12% and 21%) in both screened and non-screened groups, which would result in a lesser difference in. absolute risk reduction from screening but probably a similar, or slightly smaller, relative risk reduction. However benefits and harms, particularly over-diagnosis, need to balanced and differ by age-groups. The informed views of recipients of screening are needed to guide current and future policy on screening. © 2011. Source


Ochoa J.J.,Bond University
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2014

In line with promoting the mission of sustainable development, the sustainable building practice has been increasingly adopted in recent years. However, the process of delivering a high performance sustainable building has led to a more complex construction practice through the increment of specialized processes. Such complexities have affected construction sequencing and timing, leading to workflow variability and excess in the estimated construction time and cost. In this study reducing plan variations is considered a key improvement in the delivery process of sustainable building projects. This research used the Last Planner System (LPS) to develop a more reliable production planning process to reduce plan variations. A case study was conducted focusing on the measurement of production performance of activities and the reasons for non-completion before and after LPS implementation. The critical areas relating to poor production performance of activities were identified. Results demonstrated differences in production performance and causes of plan variations between activities in relation to and with no relation to sustainable deliverables. While the difference in the production performance is not considerable, the difference in the causes of variability is significant. The implementation of LPS resulted in a significant reduction of plan variations. As variability decreased, production performance of activities increased. The findings from this study contribute to alternative methods for an effective production planning process for sustainable building projects. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Hoffmann T.C.,Bond University | Hoffmann T.C.,University of Queensland
JAMA Internal Medicine | Year: 2015

IMPORTANCE Unrealistic patient expectations of the benefits and harms of interventions can influence decision making and may be contributing to increasing intervention uptake and health care costs. OBJECTIVE To systematically review all studies that have quantitatively assessed patients' expectations of the benefits and/or harms of any treatment, test, or screening test. EVIDENCE REVIEW A comprehensive search strategy was used in 4 databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO) up to June 2013, with no language or study type restriction.We also ran cited reference searches of included studies and contacted experts and study authors. Two researchers independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted participants' estimates of benefit and harms and authors' contemporaneous estimates. FINDINGS Of the 15 343 records screened, 36 articles (from 35 studies) involving a total of 27 323 patients were eligible. Fourteen studies focused on a screen, 15 on treatment, 3 a test, and 3 on treatment and screening. More studies assessed only benefit expectations (22 [63%]) than benefit and harm expectations (10 [29%]) or only harm (3 [8%]). Fifty-four outcomes (across 32 studies) assessed benefit expectations: of the 34 outcomes with overestimation data available, the majority of participants overestimated benefit for 22 (65%) of them. For 17 benefit expectation outcomes, we could not calculate the proportion of participants who overestimated or underestimated, although for 15 (88%) of these, study authors concluded that participants overestimated benefits. Expectations of harm were assessed by 27 outcomes (across 13 studies): underestimation data were available for 15 outcomes and the majority of participants underestimated harm for 10 (67%) of these. A correct estimation by at least 50% of participants only occurred for 2 outcomes about benefit expectations and 2 outcomes about harm expectations. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The majority of participants overestimated intervention benefit and underestimated harm. Clinicians should discuss accurate and balanced information about intervention benefits and harms with patients, providing the opportunity to develop realistic expectations and make informed decisions. Source


Background: The World Federation of Medical Education has released a revised version of their Basic Medical Education Standards. This paper compares the original and revised versions following an external review of a medical school based on the original version, and indicates potential implications of the changes for making judgements about the quality of medical education. Methods: A comparative analysis was conducted of the original and revised standards, producing a list of changes, through either "strengthened" or "new" standards or guidance for their interpretation. The potential impact of the changes on the writing of a report for this external review was then considered. Results: The revised standards have more specific requirements for curriculum design, clinical placements, research training and the support and participation of students. In order to meet the revised standards, medical schools may need to invest substantially in acquiring in-house medical education expertise and better prepared teaching and research staff. Conclusion: The bar appears to have been raised substantially in the revised standards document. While individually the changes appear sound, the overall impact, particularly in the developing world, may be substantial © 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. Source

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