Boliden Mineral AB

Boliden, Sweden

Boliden Mineral AB

Boliden, Sweden
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2011.4.0-2 | Award Amount: 25.41M | Year: 2011

The mine of the future will exploit mineral raw materials at greater depths than today, requiring completely different approaches compared to todays deep mines, in order to get mineral rights. Only these eco-efficient mines will contribute to improved access to domestic mineral resources, secure the supply of mineral raw materials for Europe and reduce the import dependency. IntelliMine will contribute to realise these concepts of invisible, zero-impact and safe mines. The mine of tomorrow will run an integrated concept. All operations necessary for the eco-efficient provision of the minerals including waste management will be carried out underground. This will drastically reduce the volumes being transported, minimising above ground installations and thus the environmental impact. IntelliMine will develop innovative methods, technologies, machines and equipment for the safe, eco-innovative, intelligent and economical exploitation of mineral raw materials in the EU, including maintenance issues, especially at greater depths. It will investigate autonomous, highly selective mineral extraction processes and machinery based on new sensor technologies as well as innovative concepts for mass flow management and transportation. Such investigations have to be accompanied by rock mechanics and ground control issues as well as health, safety and environmental issues. The concept of an invisible, zero-impact mine requires a refined process underground that selectively extracts the minerals and therefore reduces waste production closer to the mineralisation. Therefore improved near to face processing methods including backfill procedures need to be developed. The necessary level of automation in mining operations can only be achieved by reaching a higher level of integration in all parts of a mine. Fully integrated underground technologies and processes for diagnosis and extraction as well as communication, health and safety issues are the key for the success of the concept.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-AIPP6;SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-AIPP4 | Award Amount: 67.54M | Year: 2013

Our society is facing both energy and competitiveness challenges. These challenges are tightly linked and require new dynamic interactions between energy producers and energy consumers, between machines, between systems, between people and systems, etc. Cooperative automation is the key for these dynamic interactions and is enabled by the technology developed around the Internet of Things and Service Oriented Architectures. The objective of the Arrowhead project is to address the technical and applicative challenges associated to cooperative automation: -Provide a technical framework adapted in terms of functions and performances, -Propose solutions for integration with legacy systems, -Implement and evaluate the cooperative automation through real experimentations in applicative domains: electro-mobility, smart buildings, infrastructures and smart cities, industrial production, energy production and energy virtual market, -Point out the accessible innovations thanks to new services, -Lead the way to further standardization work. The strategy adopted in the project has four major dimensions: -An innovation strategy based on business and technology gap analysis paired with a market implementation strategy based on end users priorities and long term technology strategies -Application pilots where technology demonstrations in real working environments will be made -A technology framework enabling collaborative automation and closing innovation critical technology gaps -An innovation coordination methodology for complex innovation orchestration Date of approval by the ECSEL JU: 23/07/2015


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-5 | Award Amount: 17.23M | Year: 2009

The objectives of the ProMine IP address the Commissions concerns over the annual 11 billion trade deficit in metal and mineral imports. Europe has to enhance the efficiency of its overall production chain putting higher quality and added value products on the market. ProMine focuses on two parts of this chain, targeting extractive and end-user industries. Upstream, the first ever Pan-EU GIS based mineral resource and advanced modelling system for the extractive industry will be created, showing known and predicted, metallic and non-metallic mineral occurrences across the EU. Detailed 4D computer models will be produced for four metalliferous regions. Upstream work will also include demonstrating the reliability of new (Bio)technologies for an ecoefficient production of strategic metals, driven by the creation of on-site added value and the identification of specific needs of potential end-users. Downstream, a new strategy will be developed for the European extractive industry which looks not only at increasing production but also at delivering high value, tailored nano-products which will form the new raw materials for the manufacturing industry. ProMine research will focus on five nano-products, (Conductive metal (Cu, Ag, Au) fibres, rhenium and rhenium alloy powders, nano-silica, iron oxyhydroxysulphate and new nano-particle based coatings for printing paper), which will have a major impact on the economic viability of the extractive industry. They will be tested at bench scale, and a number selected for development to pilot scale where larger samples can be provided for characterisation and testing by end-user industries. It will include production, testing and evaluation of these materials, with economic evaluation, life cycle cost analysis, and environmental sustainability. ProMine with 26 partners from 11 EU member states, has a strong industrial involvement while knowledge exploitation will transfer ProMine results to the industrial community.


Awe S.A.,Lulea University of Technology | Sundkvist J.-E.,Boliden Mineral AB | Sandstrom A.,Lulea University of Technology
Minerals Engineering | Year: 2013

Antimony electrowinning from synthetic alkaline sulphide electrolytes has been studied in a nondiaphragm electrolytic cell. The electrodes were constructed in such a way that the anode produces ten times higher current density than the cathodic current density to promote sulphide oxidation to sulphate at the anode; and simultaneously decreasing the tendency of hydrogen evolution at the cathode. The result revealed that at an anodic current density lower than 1500 A/m2, minute amounts of sulphate ions were formed but when the anode current density increased beyond 1500 A/m2, sulphate formation was promoted. The initial molar concentration ratio between hydroxide and free sulphide ions should be ≥10.3 to avoid thiosulphate formation at 2000 A/m2 anodic current density under the conditions used in these experiments. The highest anodic current efficiency obtained based on the amount of sulphate formed was 89%. An increase in the anode current density as well as NaOH concentration enhances the cathodic and anodic current efficiencies with respect to the antimony metal deposited and sulphate ions produced, respectively. Despite the high anodic current densities used, the specific energy of this process ranges from 0.6 to 2.3 kW h/kg which is significantly lower than values reported previously due to the prevention of undesirable sulphur species from being formed. The tests revealed that the concentration of thiosulphate formed during the electrolysis decreased with increasing anode current density and NaOH concentration. Addition of polysulphide from 0 to 30 g/L to the electrolyte decreases the current efficiency from 83% to 32% and correspondingly increases the specific energy from 1.7 to 4.8 kW h/kg. Results showed that a build-up of sulphite and sulphate ions in the solution does not have any detrimental effect on the current efficiency of antimony deposition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..


Awe S.A.,Lulea University of Technology | Sundkvist J.-E.,Boliden Mineral AB | Bolin N.-J.,Boliden Mineral AB | Sandstrom A.,Lulea University of Technology
Minerals Engineering | Year: 2013

The technical feasibility, on laboratory scale, of hydro- and electrometallurgical processes of recovering metallic antimony from an antimony-bearing copper sulphide concentrate has been investigated. The influence of Na2S concentration, temperature and solid concentration was studied during the leaching test while the effect of current density, Na2S concentration, electrolyte temperature and NaOH concentration on antimony electrowinning from alkaline sulphide solutions was investigated. The leaching results showed that antimony dissolution is strongly dependent on the concentration of the leaching reagent as well as the leaching temperature. The antimony content in the concentrate was reduced from 1.7% to less than 0.1% Sb which is desirable for copper metallurgy. Cathode current efficiency is one of the important parameters to evaluate the performance of an electrolytic process. It is revealed in this study that current efficiency of antimony deposition from sulphide electrolytes is highly dependent on the concentration of sodium hydroxide and the current density used. The results illustrate that the combined effect of increasing anode current density (which was 10 times higher than the cathode current density) and NaOH concentration enhanced the current efficiency of the electrolytic process. It was demonstrated that excess free sulphide ions impacts the current efficiency of the process detrimentally. An integrated hydro-/electrometallurgical process flowsheet for antimony removal and recovery from a sulphide copper concentrate was developed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Skytta P.,Lulea University of Technology | Hermansson T.,Boliden Mineral AB | Elming S.-A.,Lulea University of Technology | Bauer T.,Lulea University of Technology
Journal of Structural Geology | Year: 2010

Outcrop-scale correlations of deformation fabrics with low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements revealed a two-stage structural evolution of the pre-tectonic, Palaeoproterozoic Viterliden intrusion in the Skellefte District, Sweden. The first deformation event reflected ~N-S compression during basin inversion, and comprised reverse dip-slip shearing along major ~E-W faults, whereas the low-strain lenses in between experienced penetrative deformation with a component of NE-SW elongation along the main foliation. This event is largely responsible for the present structural geometry regionally and locally, and also for the magnetic fabric of the rocks. In particular, the sub-vertical maximum principal susceptibility axes (Kmax) within the high-strain zones are related to early dip-slip deformation, and were virtually unaffected by subsequent dextral strike-slip reactivation, which is recorded by sub-horizontal rock lineations. The strike-slip deformation reflects ~E-W bulk shortening and may regionally be correlated with reverse faulting along a ~N-S trending major shear zone east of the study area. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Bauer T.E.,Lulea University of Technology | Skytta P.,Lulea University of Technology | Allen R.L.,Lulea University of Technology | Allen R.L.,Boliden Mineral AB | Weihed P.,Lulea University of Technology
Precambrian Research | Year: 2011

The Vargfors basin in the central Skellefte district, Sweden, is an inverted sedimentary sub-basin within a Palaeoproterozoic (1.89 Ga) marine volcanic arc. The sub-basin formed from upper-crustal extension and subsequent compression, following a period of intense marine volcanism and VMS ore formation. Detailed mapping and structural analysis reveals a pattern of SE-NW-striking normal faults and interlinked NE-SW-striking transfer faults, which define distinct fault-bound compartments, each with an individual structural geometry and stratigraphy. Constraints on the deformation style and mechanisms achieved by 2D forward modelling are in agreement with the previously inferred inversion of the early normal faults during a regional crustal shortening event. A rheologically weak carbonate-rich layer at the base of the sedimentary sequence favoured the fault inversion over more distributed shortening as the controlling deformation mechanism. Transposition of sedimentary strata into the approximately SE-NW faults led to formation of asymmetric synclines that were tightened during progressive shortening. Structural analysis infers a progressive opening of the basin towards SE and NW with time. Furthermore, it is inferred that a displacement gradient was developed along the main structural grain, with decreasing dip-slip displacements towards SE and NW, both during the extension and the structural inversion. VMS deposits in the vicinity of the contact between the volcanic and the overlying sedimentary rocks were formed along early normal faults, which reacted as fluid conduits. Subsequently, the deposits were transposed into the inverted faults during crustal shortening. Consequently, the inverted faults provide a useful tool for mineral exploration in the district. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Alakangas L.,Lulea University of Technology | Andersson E.,Vectura Consulting AB | Mueller S.,Boliden Mineral AB
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2013

Backfilling of open pit with sulfidic waste rock followed by inundation is a common method for reducing sulfide oxidation after mine closure. This approach can be complemented by mixing the waste rock with alkaline materials from pulp and steel mills to increase the system's neutralization potential. Leachates from 1 m3 tanks containing sulfide-rich (ca.30 wt %) waste rock formed under dry and water saturated conditions under laboratory conditions were characterized and compared to those formed from mixtures. The waste rock leachate produced an acidic leachate (pH < 2) with high concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6 mg/L), and Zn (150 mg/L) after 258 days. The leachate from water-saturated waste rock had lower concentrations of As and Cu (<2 μg/L), Pb and Zn (20 μg/L and 5 mg/L), respectively, and its pH was around 6. Crushed (<6 mm) waste rock mixed with different fractions (1-5 wt %) of green liquid dregs, fly ash, mesa lime, and argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) slag was leached on a small scale for 65 day, and showed near-neutral pH values, except for mixtures of waste rock with AOD slag and fly ash (5 % w/w) which were more basic (pH > 9). The decrease of elemental concentration in the leachate was most pronounced for Pb and Zn, while Al and S were relatively high. Overall, the results obtained were promising and suggest that alkaline by-products could be useful additives for minimizing ARD formation. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.5 | Award Amount: 2.45M | Year: 2010

This project aims at improving the operational efficiency of large-scale dynamic plants as found in petrochemical, chemical and other process industries. Costs related with industrial implementation of current model-based operation support systems, like Model Predictive Control, Real-Time Optimization and soft-sensors for these complex processes are currently very high. Moreover it is widely recognized that life-time performance of these systems is rather limited, particularly due to the fact that the underlying dynamic models need to be adapted/calibrated regularly, requiring expensive dedicated measurement campaigns. Given the importance of increasing demands on economic and sustainable process operation, there is a strong need to reduce the costs and increase the performance of model-based operation support systems.\nTherefore it is proposed to develop model-based operation support technology that enables control and model calibration at a considerable higher level of autonomy than currently possible. The technology enables autonomous maintenance by automated surveillance, continuously monitoring the process and operation support system performance. If performance degradation is anticipated then proactive adaptation of the model-based operation support system is initiated. The technology will operate on the basis of the least costly principle. The influence of the invasive testing on process operation and economics will be minimised, to the extent possible given the necessary accuracy of the resulting identified model. Moreover all decisions are based on an economic trade-off between process operation costs and benefits. This system should be able to optimise plant performance under varying operational conditions and adapting to changing circumstances. The consortium is well suited for this task. Industry is specifically involved to guide research in an industrial relevant direction and to ensure industrial validation of the technology to be developed.

Loading Boliden Mineral AB collaborators
Loading Boliden Mineral AB collaborators