Bobath Memorial Hospital

South Korea

Bobath Memorial Hospital

South Korea
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Yang B.I.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | Song B.K.,Korea University | Joung S.M.,Korea University
Journal of Physical Therapy Science | Year: 2017

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether two-handed task training is effective on motor learning of injured cerebral cortex activation and upper extremity function recovery after stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Two hemiplegic subjects participated in this study: one patient was affected on the dominant side of the body and the other was affected on the non-dominant side of the body, and both scored in the range of 58–66 in the Fugl-Meyer assessment. The excitability of the corticospinal tract and Manual Function Test were examined. [Results] The excitability of the corticospinal tract and the Manual Function Test showed significant differences in the activation of both sides of the cerebral cortex and in the variation in learning effect of upper extremity motor function recovery in patients with hemiplegic non-dominant hand (left). [Conclusion] The results suggested that two-handed task training had a different influence on dominant hand (right) and non-dominant hand (left) motor recovery. © 2017 The Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.


Cho S.T.,Hallym University | Na H.R.,Bobath Memorial Hospital
Journal of the Korean Medical Association | Year: 2017

Population analyses and demographic data have clearly documented the rapid growth of the aging population in recent years. Although the population over 65 currently accounts for approximately 13.2% of the total population in Korea, it is estimated that this number will reach at least 40% by 2060. Aging is associated with a general decline in almost every physiological function of biological systems, including the lower urinary tract. Aging is also known to put individuals at a high risk for urinary tract infections. Geriatric hospitals in Korea have undergone a large expansion in terms of the number of beds and institutions. Many elderly patients in geriatric hospitals suffer from various genitourinary disorders. In particular, voiding dysfunction and urinary tract infections are prevalent comorbidities of other chronic geriatric diseases in patients in geriatric hospitals. Careful monitoring and management can help to reduce those genitourinary problems in elderly patients in geriatric hospitals. © Korean Medical Association.


Chung S.J.,University of Ulsan | Jung Y.,University of Ulsan | Hong M.,University of Ulsan | Kim M.J.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Neurobiology of Aging | Year: 2013

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) have overlapping clinical and pathological features, suggesting a common pathway for these 2 neurodegenerative disorders. Here we investigated the association of both AD and PD GWAS top hits with PD susceptibility. We selected 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 9 genes (ABCA7, APOE, BST1, CLU, CR1, LRRK2, PARK16, PICALM, and SNCA) that were genotyped in 1036 PD case patients and 1208 controls. Case patients and controls were all ethnic Koreans. Logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios. None of the AD-susceptibility loci (ABCA7, APOE, CLU, CR1, and PICALM) showed statistically significant association with PD susceptibility. In contrast, we replicated associations of SNCA, LRRK2, BST1, and PARK16 with PD susceptibility in Koreans. Of those, the SNCA SNP rs11931074 showed the most significant associationwith PD susceptibility (adjusted odds ratio= 1.48; 95% confidence interval= 1.31-1.67; p=2.20E-10). In a logistic regression analysis with SNPs coded under an additive model, there was no significant genetic interaction between the LRRK2 and the PARK16 locus gene RAB7L1 in PD risk. Our results confirm the associations of SNCA, LRRK2, BST1, and PARK16 with PD susceptibility and fail to show significant associations of AD genome-wide association study (GWAS) top hits with PD susceptibility in a Korean population. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Chung S.J.,University of Ulsan | Kim M.-J.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | Kim J.,University of Ulsan | Kim Y.J.,University of Ulsan | And 4 more authors.
Neurobiology of Aging | Year: 2014

Genetic variants so far identified explain a small fraction of the overall inherited risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We aimed to identify novel genetic variants in AD using exome array that contains comprehensive panel. We genotyped 295,988 variants in 1005 subjects (400 AD cases and 605 controls) using Axiom Exome Genotyping Array that contains a pool of variants discovered in over 16 major human exome sequencing initiatives. Logistic regression analysis and the sequence kernel association optimal test were performed. The APOE, APOC1, and TOMM40 showed significant associations with AD in the single variant analysis. However, no significant association of other variants with AD was observed. This exome array study failed to identify novel genetic variants in AD. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Mo H.N.,National Cancer Control Institute | Shin D.W.,Seoul National University | Woo J.H.,Claremont Graduate University | Choi J.Y.,National Cancer Control Institute | And 6 more authors.
Palliative Medicine | Year: 2012

Purpose: We aimed to investigate the current practice of the involvement in decision making from the perspectives of terminal cancer patients, and to explore its possible associations with quality of life and quality of death in Korea. Methods: A multi-center, cross-sectional survey was performed on 93 terminal cancer patients. The questionnaire solicited their opinions regarding participation in treatment decision making, as well as quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire for Palliative Care) and quality of death (Good Death Inventory-Patient Version). Results: A total of 78.5% of the patients had awareness of their terminal status, while 21.5% did not; 42.4% stated that they knew their condition and shared the decision-making responsibility with the medical staff and their family, while 21.7% made decisions on their own, and 35.9% left the decision-making responsibility to others. Patients who were aware of their illness and who actively participated in the decision making did not score higher than others on outcome measures of quality of life and quality of death. Moreover, the former even showed lower scores in some domains, including the 'physical and psychological comfort' (4.99 versus 5.61, p=0.03), 'environmental comfort' (5.51 versus 6.04, p=0.08), and 'emotional functioning' (55.70 versus 71.01, p=0.06). Conclusion: in Korea, patient autonomy is not a universally accepted value from the perspectives of terminal cancer patients, nor is patient involvement in decision making always conducive to high quality of life or quality of death. The level of information and the pace at which it is provided should be tailored to each individual's ability, preference, need, and culture. © The Author(s) 2011.


SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - Feb 28, 2017) - Singapore-based Luye Medical Group has entered into a strategic partnership with OncoCare Cancer Centre furthering its ongoing strategy to make private healthcare services more integrated and available. OncoCare is the second largest private oncology treatment center in Singapore with strong growth in the last few years. With new equity investment from Luye Medical, the integrated oncology specialists will be able to further accelerate their expansion in Singapore, creating greater values to the local healthcare environment. The tie-up also allows Oncocare to benefit from Luye Medical's broad international network, including access to the rapidly growing China market. Both organizations will work together in jointly developing healthcare capabilities and services in line with the increasing local and regional demands. Through its investment in OncoCare, Luye Medical will see the group's capabilities in oncology treatment significantly expanded, thereby giving a boost to their core strategy of developing Singapore as a centre of excellence for oncology. Luye Medical Group has been building up their Singapore operations as a platform for new research and development to foster innovation and drive knowledge and best practices sharing around the region. Meeting Local Healthcare Demands Through the newly formed alliance, synergy will be leveraged between Luye Medical's resources and the capabilities of Oncocare, with ongoing plans to offer a seamless one stop oncology treatment and diagnosis centre to provide elevated care services for patients. "The capacity and capability of Luye Medical's oncology care will be expanded," said Mr Choo Kin Poo, Group Vice President, Strategy Planning & Business Development, Operations on the partnership. Despite being known for its standard of practices, quality of services, and excellence as a regional medical hub, Singapore's healthcare industry has been faced with greater challenges due to increasing demand from the local population on the availability of accessible and affordable healthcare services. Mr Choo shared his views on the current landscape of our local healthcare system, and how Luye Medical plays a role in contributing to the local medical industry. "Waiting time is a continuous challenge in the public system. It is thus important to develop synergies that will not only add value to our patients, but also help to make care more affordable. As a private healthcare provider, this is where Luye Medical comes in to support the system and provide an affordable option to our patients in the private environment as well as to create more job opportunities within the medical industry." With a common dedication towards patient care, Dr Tay Miah Hiang, CEO and Consultant Medical Oncologist of OncoCare, said, "As doctors and especially as oncologist, we must care for our patients and their relatives like how we would want ourselves or our loved ones to be cared for in similar circumstances. With this partnership, there will be an increased relentless pursuit of service excellence through employment of more doctors and staff with the same mindset, research, precision investigation and therefore better treatment and delivery of services to our patients." Adopting Best Practices Regionally In addition to benefiting the local community, another core focus of Luye Medical will be on expanding their core capabilities in both the Southeast Asian region and the China market. Headquartered in Singapore, Luye Medical has a global presence across China, South Korea, and Australia. "As a regional medical hub known for its excellence and quality in standards of practices and healthcare services, we are honoured to be able to share common industry practices that will bring benefit not only to patients, but of which can be adapted to different healthcare environments as well," mentioned Mr Liu Dianbo, Chairman of Luye Group. "The innovative healthcare model of Singapore provides an adequate eco-system to test-bed the latest industry practices before we extend our expertise and capabilities abroad. An emphasis on patient centrality and providing quality services are values we share with OncoCare, and we are definitely looking forward to the synergies which will be created." The tie up with OncoCare is part of Luye Medical Group's strategic plan to leverage the best medical expertise, standard of practices and quality of healthcare services for its upcoming development in the region, specifically, the China market. Luye Medical currently operates medical centres in Shanghai, Chongqing, Chengdu and Yantai. As part of the Group's mid-term strategy, Luye Medical will focus on developing specialized medical centers as well as general tertiary hospitals in major cities in China. About Luye Medical Luye Medical is the regional healthcare services arm of Luye Group. Headquartered in Singapore, Luye Medical oversees operations in Australia, China, South Korea and Singapore including Healthe Care (Australia), AsiaMedic (Singapore), Luye Ellium (China and South Korea), Bobath Memorial Hospital (China) and GoodWill Dental (China). Through its acquisitions and partnerships with leading healthcare organisations, Luye Medical adopts and develop world-leading technology as well as operational and management systems. Luye Medical continues to strive to provide integrated and high-quality healthcare services to both global and local customers and patients in pursuit of fulfilling its vision to become the leading global organisation in the healthcare industry. About OncoCare Founded in 2007, the OncoCare Cancer Centre (Singapore) has been committed to providing the best available cancer care to patients with its expert, personalized treatments, and efficient services. As Singapore's second largest provider of private oncology healthcare services and the fastest growing group, it currently has 5 clinics separately located at Singapore's premier hospitals. With a present team of 9 doctors, a 50% increase of staff over the next two years is expected in line with the expansion needs of Luye Medical.


Lee S.H.,Hallym University | Cho S.T.,Hallym University | Na H.R.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | Ko S.B.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | Park M.H.,Korea University
International Journal of Urology | Year: 2014

Objective: To assess factors associated with detrusor overactivity in urinary incontinence patients with Alzheimer's disease, and to determine the correlation between the degree of Alzheimer's disease and the presence of detrusor overactivity. Methods: A total of 144 Alzheimer's disease patients (48 men, 96 women; aged 56-97 years) with urinary incontinence were enrolled in this protocol. Cognitive testing was carried out using the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, the Global Deterioration Scale and Barthel's Activities of Daily Living. Urinary incontinence was assessed using a frequency-volume chart and the Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form. All study participants had a urodynamic study carried out. Results: Based on the Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form, the most common type of urinary incontinence was urge urinary incontinence followed by enuresis in men, whereas women most commonly complained of urge urinary incontinence followed by stress urinary incontinence. Detrusor overactivity was found in 57.6% of patients (25 men, 58 women) on urodynamic study. No statistical differences were found between those with and without detrusor overactivity in terms of age, sex or duration of education. No significant correlation was found between changes in Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form scores and those in the Mini-Mental State Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating and Barthel's Activities of Daily Living status. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the presence of detrusor overactivity could be predicted using Clinical Dementia Rating and Barthel's Activities of Daily Living scores (P<0.05). Conclusions: The most common type of urinary incontinence in patients with Alzheimer's disease is urge urinary incontinence. Clinical Dementia Rating and Barthel's Activities of Daily Living predict the severity of detrusor overactivity in this patient population. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.


PubMed | Korea University, Bobath Memorial Hospital, Kyung Hee University and Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychiatry investigation | Year: 2017

Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent and early feature of Alzheimers disease (AD). The morphologic changes observed in the AD brain could be caused by a failure of mitochondrial fusion mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms of two genes involved in mitochondrial fusion mechanisms, optic atrophy 1 (One coding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Among these three SNPs, rs1042837 showed statistically significant differences in allele frequency, and genotype frequency in the co-dominant 1 model and in the dominant model.These results suggest that the rs1042837 polymorphism in


Im S.,Catholic University of Korea | Park J.H.,Catholic University of Korea | Son S.K.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | Shin J.-E.,Bobath Memorial Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Clinical Rehabilitation | Year: 2014

Objective: To determine if botulinum toxin type A injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, where the intramuscular nerve endings of the gastrocnemius muscle are densely distributed, is more efficacious in controlling plantarflexion spasticity than injection at distant sites within the same muscle. Design: A double-blind randomized controlled trial. Settting: Two rehabilitation centres. Subjects: Forty stroke patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Group A received injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, group B at and below the midbelly of the muscle. Both groups received 200 IU of botulinum toxin A and were followed up to eight weeks. Main measures: Primary variables were the surface electromyography values recorded during plantarflexion; secondary variables were the Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Tardieu Scale, clonus scale, 10-metre walking test, ABILOCO and Functional Ambulation Categories. Results: At baseline, the median Modified Ashworth Scale was 2.0 (range,1+ -3.0), and there were no significant differences between the two groups in all the parameters, including spasticity. Compared to baseline, no significant differences between the two groups were detected in all the surface electromyography and clinical parameters at week 8 (P > 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvement of spasticity with a median Modified Ashworth Scale of 1+ (range, 0.0-2.0) at eight weeks. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin A injection was associated with a significant improvement from baseline to week 8 in both treatment groups, however, no significant difference between the 2 groups was observed, based on the electrophysiological and clinical parameters employed in this study. © 2013 The Author(s).


PubMed | Yesung Hospital, Catholic University of Korea and Bobath Memorial Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical rehabilitation | Year: 2016

To determine if botulinum toxin type A injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, where the intramuscular nerve endings of the gastrocnemius muscle are densely distributed, is more efficacious in controlling plantarflexion spasticity than injection at distant sites within the same muscle.A double-blind randomized controlled trial.Two rehabilitation centres.Forty stroke patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Group A received injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, group B at and below the midbelly of the muscle. Both groups received 200 IU of botulinum toxin A and were followed up to eight weeks.Primary variables were the surface electromyography values recorded during plantarflexion; secondary variables were the Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Tardieu Scale, clonus scale, 10-metre walking test, ABILOCO and Functional Ambulation Categories.At baseline, the median Modified Ashworth Scale was 2.0 (range,1+ -3.0), and there were no significant differences between the two groups in all the parameters, including spasticity. Compared to baseline, no significant differences between the two groups were detected in all the surface electromyography and clinical parameters at week 8 (P > 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvement of spasticity with a median Modified Ashworth Scale of 1+ (range, 0.0-2.0) at eight weeks.Botulinum toxin A injection was associated with a significant improvement from baseline to week 8 in both treatment groups, however, no significant difference between the 2 groups was observed, based on the electrophysiological and clinical parameters employed in this study.

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