Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Marietta, GA, United States

The physiological Src proto-oncogene is a protein-tyrosine kinase that plays key roles in cell growth, division, migration, and survival signaling pathways. From the N- to C-terminus, Src contains a unique domain, an SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a protein-tyrosine kinase domain, and a regulatory tail. The chief phosphorylation sites of human Src include an activating pTyr419 that results from phosphorylation in the kinase domain by an adjacent Src molecule and an inhibitory pTyr530 in the regulatory tail that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) or Chk (Csk homologous kinase). The oncogenic Rous sarcoma viral protein lacks the equivalent of Tyr530 and is constitutively activated. Inactive Src is stabilized by SH2 and SH3 domains on the rear of the kinase domain where they form an immobilizing and inhibitory clamp. Protein kinases including Src contain hydrophobic regulatory and catalytic spines and collateral shell residues that are required to assemble the active enzyme. In the inactive enzyme, the regulatory spine contains a kink or a discontinuity with a structure that is incompatible with catalysis. The conversion of inactive to active Src is accompanied by electrostatic exchanges involving the breaking and making of distinct sets of kinase domain salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. Src-catalyzed protein phosphorylation requires the participation of two Mg2+ ions. Although nearly all protein kinases possess a common K/E/D/D signature, each enzyme exhibits its unique variations of the protein-kinase reaction template. Bosutinib, dasatinib, and ponatinib are Src/multikinase inhibitors that are approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and vandetanib is approved for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. The Src and BCR-Abl inhibitors saracatinib and AZD0424, along with the previous four drugs, are in clinical trials for a variety of solid tumors including breast and lung cancers. Both ATP and targeted therapeutic Src protein kinase inhibitors such as dasatinib and ponatinib make hydrophobic contacts with catalytic spine residues and form hydrogen bonds with hinge residues connecting the small and large kinase lobes. ©2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Groh G.I.,Blue Ridge | Wirth M.A.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons | Year: 2011

Traumatic sternoclavicular joint injuries account for <3% of all traumatic joint injuries. Proper recognition and treatment are vital because these injuries may be life threatening. Injuries are classified according to patient age, severity, and, in the setting of dislocation, the direction of the medial clavicle. Anterior injuries are far more common than posterior injuries. Posterior dislocation may be associated with complications such as dyspnea, dysphagia, cyanosis, and swelling of the ipsilateral extremity as well as paresthesia associated with compression of the trachea, esophagus, or great vessels. These life-threatening complications may present at the time of injury but can develop later, as well. Radiography has been largely supplanted by CT for evaluation of this injury, although an oblique view developed by Wirth and Rockwood is useful in evaluating isolated sternoclavicular injury. MRI is useful in differentiating physeal injury from sternoclavicular dislocation in patients aged <23 years. © 2011 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Source


Roskoski R.,Blue Ridge
Pharmacological Research | Year: 2014

The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family consists of four members that belong to the ErbB lineage of proteins (ErbB1-4). These receptors consist of a glycosylated extracellular domain, a single hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and an intracellular portion with a juxtamembrane segment, a protein kinase domain, and a carboxyterminal tail. Seven ligands bind to EGFR including epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor α, none bind to ErbB2, two bind to ErbB3, and seven ligands bind to ErbB4. The ErbB proteins function as homo and heterodimers. The heterodimer consisting of ErbB2, which lacks a ligand, and ErbB3, which is kinase impaired, is surprisingly the most robust signaling complex of the ErbB family. Growth factor binding to EGFR induces a large conformational change in the extracellular domain, which leads to the exposure of a dimerization arm in domain II of the extracellular segment. Two ligand-EGFR complexes unite to form a back-to-back dimer in which the ligands are on opposite sides of the aggregate. Following ligand binding, EGFR intracellular kinase domains form an asymmetric homodimer that resembles the heterodimer formed by cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase. The carboxyterminal lobe of the activator kinase of the dimer interacts with the amino-terminal lobe of the receiver kinase thereby leading to its allosteric stimulation. Downstream ErbB signaling modules include the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PKB) pathway, the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway, and the phospholipase C (PLCγ) pathway. Several malignancies are associated with the mutation or increased expression of members of the ErbB family including lung, breast, stomach, colorectal, head and neck, and pancreatic carcinomas and glioblastoma (a brain tumor). Gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are orally effective protein-kinase targeted quinazoline derivatives that are used in the treatment of ERBB1-mutant lung cancer. Lapatinib is an orally effective quinazoline derivative used in the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. Trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and ado-trastuzumab emtansine, which are given intravenously, are monoclonal antibodies that target the extracellular domain and are used for the treatment of ErbB2-positive breast cancer; ado-trastuzumab emtansine is an antibody-drug conjugate that delivers a cytotoxic drug to cells overexpressing ErbB2. Cetuximab and panitumumab are monoclonal antibodies that target ErbB1 and are used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Cancers treated with these targeted drugs eventually become resistant to them. The role of combinations of targeted drugs or targeted drugs with cytotoxic therapies is being explored in an effort to prevent or delay drug resistance in the treatment of these malignancies.© 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Roskoski Jr. R.,Blue Ridge
Pharmacological Research | Year: 2013

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase was first described in 1994 as the NPM-ALK fusion protein that is expressed in the majority of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. ALK is a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that was more fully characterized in 1997. Physiological ALK participates in embryonic nervous system development, but its expression decreases after birth. ALK is a member of the insulin receptor superfamily and is most closely related to leukocyte tyrosine kinase (Ltk), which is a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase. Twenty different ALK-fusion proteins have been described that result from various chromosomal rearrangements, and they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors. The EML4-ALK fusion protein and four other ALK-fusion proteins play a fundamental role in the development in about 5% of non-small cell lung cancers. The formation of dimers by the amino-terminal portion of the ALK fusion proteins results in the activation of the ALK protein kinase domain that plays a key role in the tumorigenic process. Downstream signaling from ALK fusion proteins involves the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 cell proliferation module and the JAK/STAT cell survival pathway. Furthermore, nearly two dozen ALK activating mutations participate in the pathogenesis of childhood neuroblastomas along with ALK overexpression. The occurrence of oncogenic ALK, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer, has generated considerable interest and effort in developing ALK inhibitors. Currently, crizotinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer along with an approved fluorescence in situ hybridization kit used for the diagnosis of the disease. The emergence of crizotinib drug resistance with a median occurrence at approximately 10 months after the initiation of therapy has stimulated the development of second-generation drugs for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and other disorders. About 28% of the cases of crizotinib resistance are related to nearly a dozen different mutations of ALK in the EML4-ALK fusion protein; the other cases of resistance are related to the upregulation of alternative signaling pathways or to undefined mechanisms. It is remarkable that the EML4-ALK fusion protein was discovered in 2007 and crizotinib was approved for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer in 2011, which is a remarkably short timeframe in the overall scheme of drug discovery. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Roskoski Jr. R.,Blue Ridge
Pharmacological Research | Year: 2014

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family consists of four members that belong to the ErbB lineage of proteins (ErbB1-4). These receptors consist of an extracellular domain, a single hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and an intracellular portion with a juxtamembrane segment, a protein kinase domain, and a carboxyterminal tail. The ErbB proteins function as homo and heterodimers. Growth factor binding to EGFR induces a large conformational change in the extracellular domain. Two ligand-EGFR complexes unite to form a back-to-back dimer in which the ligands are on opposite sides of the aggregate. Following ligand binding, EGFR intracellular kinase domains form an asymmetric dimer. The carboxyterminal lobe of the activator kinase of the dimer interacts with the amino-terminal lobe of the receiver kinase thereby leading to its allosteric stimulation. Several malignancies are associated with the mutation or increased expression of members of the ErbB family including lung, breast, stomach, colorectal, head and neck, and pancreatic carcinomas. Gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are orally effective protein-kinase targeted quinazoline derivatives that are used in the treatment of ERBB1-mutant lung cancer and lapatinib is an orally effective quinazoline derivative used in the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies that target the extracellular domain of ErbB2 are used for the treatment of ErbB2-positive breast cancer and monoclonal antibodies that target ErbB1 and are used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Cancers treated with these targeted drugs eventually become resistant to them, and a current goal of research is to develop drugs that are effective against drug-resistant tumors. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations