Blood Transfusion Unit

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Blood Transfusion Unit

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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Olsson K.S.,Section of Hematology and Coagulation | Konar J.,Blood Transfusion Unit | Dufva I.H.,Sahlgrenska University Hospital | Dufva I.H.,Herlev Hospital | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Haematology | Year: 2011

The HLA-related hemochromatosis mutation C282Y is thought to have originated in Ireland in a person with HLA-A3-B14 and was spread by Vikings. Irish people with two HLA-A3 alleles had a high risk of hemochromatosis. In this study, from west Sweden, we wanted to test these hypotheses. Methods: HFE mutations in controls, bone marrow donors with HLA-A3/A3 and patients with hemochromatosis. HLA haplotypes, extended haplotype analysis and pedigree studies.Results: The allelic C282Y frequency 0.04, (CI 0.01-0.07) was lower (P < 0.001) in Sweden than in Ireland 0.10 (CI 0.08-0.11), and Swedish bone marrow donors with HLA-A3/A3 (n = 77) had a low risk of hemochromatosis. HLA haplotypes available from 239/262 (91.5%) proband patients homozygous for C282Y showed a dominance of A3-B7 and A3-B14 both in linkage disequilibrium with controls (P < 0.001). Pedigree studies extended into the 17th century supported a local founder effect of A3-B14 in the county of Bohuslän. The A3-B14 haplotype may well be the original and A3-B7 the result of centromeric recombinations. The haplotype diversity and recombination events were not different from a Celtic series. These findings do not support the hypothesis of the C282Y mutation being of an Irish Celtic origin. Conclusions: The C282Y frequency shows a west to east decline from Ireland through the north of Europe. Vikings may have been involved in the spread of C282Y, but the mutation is probably older and may have been spread in Europe by earlier seafarers. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Motayo B.O.,Microbiology Unit | Motayo B.O.,University of Ibadan | Akpa O.M.,University of Ibadan | Ezeani I.,Blood Transfusion Unit | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Immunoassay and Immunochemistry | Year: 2015

Hepatitis B and C have been identified as major causes of Transfusion transmitted infections, in Nigeria. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in prospective blood donors in Abeokuta, Nigeria. 305 blood donors were screened for the presence of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and HCV using a rapid immunochromatographic kit (DiaSpot®). Demographic information was also collected. Males constituted 96.4%, singles were the majority with 65%. Prevalence of HBsAg was 9.8%, HCV 1.3%, and dual positivity 0.3%. Prevalence of HBsAg and HCV among males was 10.2% and 1.4%, while females recorded 0.0% for HCV and HBsAg. Dual positivity was recorded in a male (0.33%). Analysis of the study variables revealed that only educational status was statistically associated with positivity of HBsAg (χ2 = 7.49, p = 0.02), HCV prevalence was highest in the illiterate group it was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). We report the prevalence rates of anti-HCV Ab and HBsAg in blood donors from Ogun State, Nigeria. Our results reveals higher rate of HBsAg and evidence of co-infection with both viruses, illiteracy was the only variable associated with HBV infection. We advocate for the inclusion of anti-HBc or HBeAg in donor screening in our environment. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Salam A.,National University of Malaysia | Yousuf R.,Blood Transfusion Unit | Yousuf R.,Darul Iman University, Malaysia | Bakar S.M.A.,University of Malaya | Haque M.,Darul Iman University, Malaysia
International Medical Journal | Year: 2013

Introduction: Stress is an external constraint which upsets an individual both mentally and physically. Study showed that medical students suffer from higher stress than other faculty students. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the reporting of stress as evident among medical students in Malaysia. Design: It was a retrospective systematic review of literatures. Materials and Method: Literature was searched through electronic databases for English articles published on stress and other psychological determinants among Malaysian medical students till September 2012. Searched terms used combinations of the related terms. Total 13 articles were reviewed and data were extracted. Results: Stress among Malaysian medical students was as high as 56% which is alarming. Year of study, financial problem and relationship problem with parents, siblings and lecturers were the significant determinants. Examination and academic related stressors were the most significant source and religion was the mostly used coping strategy. Conclusions: Medical education is highly stressful to students. Teaching processes exerts an unintentional negative effect on students' mental health. Teachers must ensure a supportive learning environment to facilitate students and be more aware of their function as an ideal role model and guide aimed to relieve academic and examination related stress from their students. Further large, prospective studies are encouraged to identify the impact on affected individual. © 2013 Japan International Cultural Exchange Foundation & Japan Health Sciences University.


Tadini G.,Pediatric Dermatology Unit | Tadini G.,Pediatric Highly Intensive Care Unit | Pezzani L.,Pediatric Highly Intensive Care Unit | Ghirardello S.,University of Milan | And 3 more authors.
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2015

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is comprised of a group of hereditary mechanobullous disorders that are characterised by extremely fragile skin and mucous membranes. This results in blister formation and nonhealing wounds. This case report describes the results of an innovative treatment of two large skin lesions in a newborn with dystrophic recessive EB (DEB) who experienced bacterial superinfections and progressive anaemisation. The lesions were treated with platelet gels derived from allogeneic cord blood (cord blood platelet gel, CBPGs). The skin lesions were clinically evaluated and treated with CBPG weekly until they completely healed. The first and second lesion required CBPG applications for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Both lesions were monitored weekly for 6 weeks after the last CBPG application, and no significant relapses were observed during the follow-up period. This case indicates that CBPG is an effective and safe therapeutic option for managing newborns with DEB, particularly as treatment and prevention of fluid loss and superinfection. © 2015 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Blood Transfusion Unit and University of Milan
Type: | Journal: BMJ case reports | Year: 2015

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is comprised of a group of hereditary mechanobullous disorders that are characterised by extremely fragile skin and mucous membranes. This results in blister formation and non-healing wounds. This case report describes the results of an innovative treatment of two large skin lesions in a newborn with dystrophic recessive EB (DEB) who experienced bacterial superinfections and progressive anaemisation. The lesions were treated with platelet gels derived from allogeneic cord blood (cord blood platelet gel, CBPGs). The skin lesions were clinically evaluated and treated with CBPG weekly until they completely healed. The first and second lesion required CBPG applications for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Both lesions were monitored weekly for 6 weeks after the last CBPG application, and no significant relapses were observed during the follow-up period. This case indicates that CBPG is an effective and safe therapeutic option for managing newborns with DEB, particularly as treatment and prevention of fluid loss and superinfection.

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