Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit

Port-Saint-Louis-du-Rhône, France

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit

Port-Saint-Louis-du-Rhône, France
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Detrait M.Y.,University of Lyon | Morisset S.,Groupement Hospitalier Sud | Peffault De Latour R.,Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit | Yakoub-Agha I.,Lille University Hospital Center | And 10 more authors.
Bone Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2015

Sclerotic chronic GvHD (cGvHD) is one of the most severe complications after allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Risk factors associated with this complication remain not very well defined. With the aim to define a pre-transplantation risk profile, we have conducted a French retrospective analysis in 705 consecutive patients between 2005 and 2010. Analyses to determine pre-transplantation risk factors included as variables: patient and donor age, kind of donor, HLA matching, ABO matching, sex-matching, diagnosis, stem cell source, gender, GvHD prophylaxis and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in the conditioning regimen. The cumulative incidence of sclerotic cGvHD was 18% (95% CI, 16.6-19.6) 3 years after onset of cGvHD. In univariate analysis, we found a significantly lower number of sclerotic cGvHD form in patients transplanted from cord blood cells (P=0.0021), in patients with a one mismatched donor (P=0.041) and in patients who had received ATG in the conditioning regimen (P=0.002). In multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of sclerotic cGvHD were young patient age, multiple myeloma and PBSC as the stem cell source. ATG in conditioning regimen and cord blood unit as the stem cell source were associated with a lower risk. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


PubMed | Institute Paoli Calmettes, University of Lyon, Lille University Hospital Center, Data Management and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bone marrow transplantation | Year: 2015

Sclerotic chronic GvHD (cGvHD) is one of the most severe complications after allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Risk factors associated with this complication remain not very well defined. With the aim to define a pre-transplantation risk profile, we have conducted a French retrospective analysis in 705 consecutive patients between 2005 and 2010. Analyses to determine pre-transplantation risk factors included as variables: patient and donor age, kind of donor, HLA matching, ABO matching, sex-matching, diagnosis, stem cell source, gender, GvHD prophylaxis and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in the conditioning regimen. The cumulative incidence of sclerotic cGvHD was 18% (95% CI, 16.6-19.6) 3 years after onset of cGvHD. In univariate analysis, we found a significantly lower number of sclerotic cGvHD form in patients transplanted from cord blood cells (P=0.0021), in patients with a one mismatched donor (P=0.041) and in patients who had received ATG in the conditioning regimen (P=0.002). In multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of sclerotic cGvHD were young patient age, multiple myeloma and PBSC as the stem cell source. ATG in conditioning regimen and cord blood unit as the stem cell source were associated with a lower risk.


Philippe M.,Groupement Hospitalier Sud | Ranchon F.,Groupement Hospitalier Sud | Ranchon F.,University of Lyon | Gilis L.,Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit | And 16 more authors.
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC) is a common complication. Although supportive measures have been the standard of care for many years, several studies suggested the efficacy of cidofovir. The aim of this study was to assess the safety profile and efficacy of cidofovir. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients treated with cidofovir in our HSCT unit between March 2011 and May 2013. Data for efficacy (partial [PR] or complete response [CR]), prescription (dose, frequency, number of doses, and administration route), and toxicity were collected from published reports and medical files. Renal toxicity was evaluated using creatinine clearance calculated with the Cockcroft and Gault formula. A parallel literature search using PubMed (last search, May 2015) was performed. From March 2011 to June 2013, 27 of 181 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT in our department received cidofovir for BKV-HC: 24 (88.9%) intravenously, 1 intravesically, and 2 via both routes. Mean dose was 5 mg/kg per administration, for a median of 4 injections (range, 1 to 11), from twice a week to once every 2 weeks. CR was achieved in 22 patients (81.5%), PR in 2, and no response in 2 patients. Eight patients presented renal failure (29.6%): 6 moderate (creatinine clearance < 60 mL/min) and 2 severe (creatinine clearance < 30 mLmin). Mean decrease in creatinine clearance after cidofovir was 27% (35 mL/min; range, 2 to 159). In 3 cases renal insufficiency and hematologic toxicity led to discontinuation of treatment or switch to intravesical instillation. For 3 patients cidofovir dose was reduced because of nephrotoxicity. Thirteen studies have reported on the use of cidofovir for BKV-HC (204 patients) since 2005. Intravenous cidofovir was used for 91.3% of patients, with doses ranging from.5 to 5 mg/kg. The main toxicity reported was renal failure (9% to 50% in 9 studies). Between 60% and 100% of CRs were observed independently of cidofovir dose or administration route. Cidofovir is an effective therapy for BKV-HC but requires very precise renal function management to avoid toxicity. Cidofovir treatment modalities (high dose, intravesical instillation, or low dose [≤1 mg/kg]) needs to be investigated in randomized controlled trials. © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.


PubMed | Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit, French Institute of Health and Medical Research, University of Lyon and Groupement Hospitalier Sud
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation | Year: 2016

After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC) is a common complication. Although supportive measures have been the standard of care for many years, several studies suggested the efficacy of cidofovir. The aim of this study was to assess the safety profile and efficacy of cidofovir. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients treated with cidofovir in our HSCT unit between March 2011 and May 2013. Data for efficacy (partial [PR] or complete response [CR]), prescription (dose, frequency, number of doses, and administration route), and toxicity were collected from published reports and medical files. Renal toxicity was evaluated using creatinine clearance calculated with the Cockcroft and Gault formula. A parallel literature search using PubMed (last search, May 2015) was performed. From March 2011 to June 2013, 27 of 181 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT in our department received cidofovir for BKV-HC: 24 (88.9%) intravenously, 1 intravesically, and 2 via both routes. Mean dose was 5mg/kg per administration, for a median of 4 injections (range, 1 to 11), from twice a week to once every 2weeks. CR was achieved in 22 patients (81.5%), PR in 2, and no response in 2 patients. Eight patients presented renal failure (29.6%): 6 moderate (creatinine clearance<60mL/min) and 2 severe (creatinine clearance<30 mLmin). Mean decrease in creatinine clearance after cidofovir was 27% (35mL/min; range, 2 to 159). In 3 cases renal insufficiency and hematologic toxicity led to discontinuation of treatment or switch to intravesical instillation. For 3 patients cidofovir dose was reduced because of nephrotoxicity. Thirteen studies have reported on the use of cidofovir for BKV-HC (204 patients) since 2005. Intravenous cidofovir was used for 91.3% of patients, with doses ranging from .5 to 5mg/kg. The main toxicity reported was renal failure (9% to 50% in 9 studies). Between 60% and 100% of CRs were observed independently of cidofovir dose or administration route. Cidofovir is an effective therapy for BKV-HC but requires very precise renal function management to avoid toxicity. Cidofovir treatment modalities (high dose, intravesical instillation, or low dose [1mg/kg]) needs to be investigated in randomized controlled trials.

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