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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - April 19, 2017) - Paul Saxton, President of Lincoln Mining Corporation (TSX VENTURE:LMG) ("Lincoln" or the "Company") and George Sanders, President of Goldcliff Resource Corporation ("Goldcliff") are pleased to report that they, as Pine Grove gold joint venture partners, have made significant progress in advancing the permitting of the Pine Grove project, in Lyon County, Nevada. Critical to the overall permitting process is our engagement of Mr. Del Fortner as Director of Permitting and Environmental Compliance. From 2003 to 2006 Mr. Fortner directed the Federal mining program for Nevada as Deputy State Director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Since 2006, Mr. Fortner has been in private practise with an excellent record of advising resource development projects on all aspects of local, state and federal permitting. Mr. Fortner is a graduate of the University of Akron with a BSc. degree in Geology. Mr. Fortner will assist the joint venture in developing the most cost effective and timely strategies for all exploration and mine development permit issues. He will also provide guidance for all communication with environmental consultants, local, state and federal agencies and local stakeholders. Mr. Fortner has already met with the Lincoln exploration team to assist in the preparation of drill permits. The joint venture plans an additional reverse circulation drill program to further expand the new upper zone discovered at the Wilson deposit in the fall 2016 drill program. He will also be meeting with the Lincoln Chief Operating Officer to develop a Plan of Operations for submission for mine development. The joint venture partners welcome Mr. Fortner's contribution to advancing the Pine Grove project. Jeffery Wilson, Vice President of Exploration of Lincoln Mining Corporation, and a Qualified Person under NI 43-101 has reviewed, prepared, and approved the scientific technical disclosure contained in this news release. Lincoln Mining Corp. is a Canadian precious metals exploration and development company with two projects in various stages of exploration and development, which include the advanced stage Pine Grove gold property in Nevada and the pre-development stage Oro Cruz gold property in California. In the United States, the Company operates under Lincoln Gold US Corp. and Lincoln Resource Group Corp., both are Nevada corporations. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. THIS PRESS RELEASE MAY INCLUDE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS OR INFORMATION. ALL STATEMENTS OTHER THAN STATEMENTS OF HISTORICAL FACT INCLUDED IN THIS RELEASE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, STATEMENTS REGARDING THE STATUS OF THE COMPANY'S PROPERTIES ARE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS THAT INVOLVE VARIOUS RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES. THERE CAN BE NO ASSURANCE THAT SUCH STATEMENTS WILL PROVE TO BE ACCURATE AND ACTUAL RESULTS AND FUTURE EVENTS COULD DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE ANTICIPATED IN SUCH STATEMENTS. IMPORTANT FACTORS THAT COULD CAUSE ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THE COMPANY'S PLANS OR EXPECTATIONS INCLUDE AVAILABILITY OF CAPITAL AND FINANCING TO MAINTAIN THE COMPANY'S PROJECTS; GENERAL ECONOMIC, MARKET OR BUSINESS CONDITIONS; FLUCTUATING METAL PRICES; REGULATORY CHANGES; TIMELINESS OF GOVERNMENT OR REGULATORY APPROVALS AND OTHER RISKS DETAILED HEREIN AND FROM TIME TO TIME IN THE FILINGS MADE BY THE COMPANY. THE COMPANY MAKES ALL REASONABLE EFFORTS TO UPDATE ITS CORPORATE MATERIAL, DOCUMENTATION AND FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION ON A TIMELY BASIS.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: grist.org

The agency, which tends to U.S. public lands, has lately caused quite a stir with recent changes to its homepage banner. Could BLM be trying to tell us something? Let’s take a quick trip through the site’s updates over the last few weeks. We begin with two people on a backpacking trip, looking toward the sunrise — and, presumably, a brighter future. Just kidding! No more future! How about a massive seam of coal instead? Two weeks ago, the bureau swapped the wholesome hikers for this wall of coal, dwarfing a tiny person and car in the corner. We get the message: Humans small, coal big. But in case that didn’t get the point across, BLM changed things up again this week. In the newest image, people are absent altogether, though the pipeline alludes to their domination over the landscape. There are some mountains and forest fading into the background, like an afterthought. The makeover is in line with the agency’s recent moves: Since Trump took office, BLM has sold huge leases for oil drilling and coal mining on public lands. As BLM spokesperson Jeff Krauss told NPR, the rotating images are part of an “IT redesign” to showcase the many things the agency manages.


In another U-turn from existing environmental policy, the Trump administration has eased the way for a controversial California desert water project that President Obama’s team had blocked. Federal directives drafted under Obama had erected a major obstacle to Cadiz Inc.’s long-standing plans to pump Mojave Desert groundwater and sell it to urban Southern California. But in a March 29 memo, an acting assistant director at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management revoked two legal guidances that underpinned the agency’s 2015 decision that Cadiz could not use an existing federal railroad right-of-way for a new water pipeline to carry supplies from the project’s proposed well field to the Colorado River Aqueduct. That meant Cadiz would have to go through federal environmental review to construct a pipeline over federal land, a lengthy and costly process that the company wants to avoid. Cadiz immediately asked the BLM to reverse what it called a flawed decision. The Obama administration declined to do so. The new administration appears sympathetic to the company’s concerns. Although the one-page order doesn’t mention Cadiz, it sets the stage for reversing the finding by BLM’s California field office, which determined that the company needed federal approval for its proposed 43-mile pipeline. The memo from the BLM, issued under Trump, also states that future right-of-way decisions will be made by the agency’s Washington office. Cadiz Chief Executive Scott Slater said that he is “cautiously optimistic” that the new decision will open the way for a pipeline on the right-of-way. U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), a longtime opponent of the groundwater project, condemned the move. “The Trump administration has once again put corporate profits ahead of the public’s interest,” she said in a statement. Feinstein called the reversal “a blatant attempt to muscle the Cadiz water project through,” and “an effort to circumvent an environmental review that any project of this magnitude on federal land would normally undergo.” The Cadiz project was approved by San Bernardino County, and the company prevailed in several environmental lawsuits filed under state law. But Feinstein, who was instrumental in creating the nearby Mojave National Preserve, has doggedly fought Cadiz. For years she has attached a rider to congressional appropriations bills barring the BLM from spending money on the Cadiz project. The company, founded by Keith Brackpool, wants to pump enough groundwater from beneath its private Mojave holdings to supply 100,000 homes a year and sell it to urban California at prices that could, over the project's 50-year-life, reap $1 billion to $2 billion in revenue. Federal hydrologists have said Cadiz experts are overstating the natural recharge rate of the desert aquifer. And public land advocates argue the pumping could dry up springs vital to wildlife on surrounding federal land, a claim that Cadiz rejects. The company has garnered congressional support, including from Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah), the chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee. Bishop was one of 18 members of Congress that a month ago urged Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to withdraw the BLM directives — which they said threatened businesses’ ability to run power, telephone or fiber optic lines along railroad rights-of-way. “I think it has a lot to do with things other than Cadiz,” Slater said. The issue revolves around how much leeway railroads have in letting other interests use their rights-of-way. An Interior Department solicitor’s 1989 opinion concluded that the 1875 railroad law allowed railroads to authorize other uses without Interior approval. A later solicitor opinion modified that, saying other uses had to derive from or further a railroad purpose. The two rescinded memos laid out guidelines for deciding what furthered railroad purposes. And the California BLM office subsequently concluded that "conveyance of water for public consumption is not a railroad purpose.” That finding, said opposition attorney Adam Keats, can still be used against the project. “This is not an easy thing for the Trump administration to unwind,” he said. Slater is a water attorney and shareholder of the law firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, which runs a high-profile lobbying operation in Washington. For three years Slater was co-chair, along with David Bernhardt, of the firm’s Natural Resources Department. Bernhardt, who served as Interior Department solicitor under the George W. Bush administration, is reportedly a candidate for a top-level Interior position under Trump. The department oversees the BLM. Slater said Bernhardt was not behind last week’s action. “David did not lobby for us…. I do not believe that he had anything to do with it.” Crescenta Valley water conservation status goes from yellow to blue California isn't giving up on fighting auto pollution — even with Trump in office


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

America's environmental agencies have made an about-face since Donald Trump became president—and not just policy-wise. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), an Interior Department agency that manages 247.3 million acres of public lands, used to have a spectacular Flickr page. And by that, I mean it was the go-to destination for exquisite photos of our country's wildest vistas. But in a blog post today, The Wilderness Society (full disclosure: I worked there between 2013 and 2014), a national conservation nonprofit, noticed something strange. As of March this year, the BLM was no longer posting images of rivers, forests, deserts, and mountains. Instead, its Flickr page now exclusively shares portraits of oil wells, mining pits, and construction—the kind of development that stands to devastate the very places the agency exists to protect. "The Bureau of Land Management's Flickr page, long a repository of gorgeous parks and public lands photos, appears to have a new focus: coal, oil and other fossil fuels," wrote The Wilderness Society. This is no doubt a result of our new administration's pro-fossil fuel energy strategy. Trump has been a vocal proponent of coal, despite market indications that coal will soon bottom out. From 2015 to 2016, he received $820,922 in campaign funding from fossil fuel interests (still, his political opponent, Hillary Clinton, received slightly more). On a Cabinet level, Trump's appointees are similarly positioned. Scott Pruitt, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, is notoriously corrupted by energy corporations. And Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, whose purview includes the BLM, has previously advocated for more drilling on public lands. Since Trump's inauguration, public lands have been caught in the GOP's crosshairs. Republicans in Congress have removed important land protections and limited public involvement in environmental decision-making processes. In an executive order this week, Trump threatened to undo certain national monument designations—an act that would be catastrophic not only for America's wildlands, but for rural communities as well. "They've set a high standard for public input, and the clock is ticking now," Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ) said in a statement. "I'm concerned that Republican rhetoric on our public lands is being taken for fact and that Secretary Zinke is being set up for failure here." Hopefully, the state of the BLM's Flickr page isn't a harbinger of what's to come.


PHOENIX, AZ / ACCESSWIRE / May 2, 2017 / Tombstone Exploration Corporation (OTC PINK: TMBXF), a fully reporting company, announced today that on April 27, 2017, it paid the US Bureau of Land Management ("BLM") the required reclamation bond fee to drill exploration holes on its 100% owned unpatented mining claims at the Stardust Project, located in Yuma County, Arizona. The encouraging results from the rock sampling program over the Stardust Project indicate the presence of a high angle detachment related precious metals vein system. Highlights include a sample returning 7.04 g/t gold with multiple other samples over 1 g/t gold of the 70 assay results. The mineralization present at the Stardust Project appears to be located within detachment related veins hosted by intensively chloritic and hematitic host rocks. The vein system has been sampled over a strike of approximately 3200 feet (975 meters). These veins appear to be a feeder system of an extensive partially eroded low angle fault system regionally present. Alan Brown, President of TMBXF, stated, "We are excited about this next phase of exploration and very optimistic that this prospect will significantly further the growth of our company. This first drill phase at Stardust will attempt further definition of the character, size and potential of the Stardust Property." TMBXF has recently received a diamond core drilling proposal from a highly recommended professional drilling company to complete the first phase of drilling to be approximately 3000 ft. Tombstone Exploration Corporation is a gold silver copper exploration company based in Phoenix, Arizona. The Company's goal is to maximize shareholder value through focused exploration, testing and development of high quality mineral targets in the prolific mineral producing areas in S.W. USA. This goal will be achieved in part through the application of the best mineral exploration practices and techniques available to our experienced exploration and management team, including adherence to the highest possible standards of corporate responsibility, governance and conduct. This release contains statements that constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These statements appear in a number of places in this release and include all statements that are not statements of historical fact regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of Tombstone Exploration Corporation, its directors or its officers with respect to, among other things: (i) financing plans; (ii) trends affecting its financial condition or results of operations; (iii) growth strategy and operating strategy. The words "may," "would," "will," "expect," "estimate," "can," "believe," "potential" and similar expressions and variations thereof are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are Tombstone Exploration Corporation's ability to control, and actual results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of various factors. More information about the potential factors that could affect the business and financial results is and will be included in Tombstone Exploration Corporation's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: scienceblogs.com

Lennox Yearwood Jr was on his way to speak at the March for Science in DC, when something bad happened. He tells us: …at the March For Science in Washington DC on Earth Day, I was assaulted, roughed up, and detained by police in the shadow of the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture. It was not part of an action or planned civil disobedience. It was sadly a much more regular event – an interaction between police and a person of color gone very wrong. He continues: I was walking in the rain and carrying an umbrella down Constitution Ave. from the National Archives Building towards the Washington Monument. Constitution Ave. was closed and I was excited to see so many people out for the Science March. As I approached 14th St. on Constitution, the walk sign was on, but there was an MPD officer in the middle of street letting cars proceed across 14th so I stayed on the curb. I waited as the crossing signal turned red and then it turned back to walk, signaling clearance for all of us on the curb to cross, which we started to do. I was the only person of color in the immediate area. The police officer then told everyone to get out of the crosswalk. By then I was about half way across the street. I paused in the middle of the street and then decided it was easier to proceed to the other side of the street, in effect getting out of the crosswalk. The officer then ran up to me, grabbed me forcefully by my jacket and swung me around, slamming me up against a food truck. I yelled, “What are you doing? Stop grabbing me.” He told me to stop resisting, to which I responded that I wasn’t. I dropped my umbrella, and put my hands up. I told him I was there for the Science March. He said he had to detain me because I “could be on drugs.” YES, he really said that. Conspiracy to jay walk. It gets worse. More cops show up, more tension. Eventually it deescalates as Reverend Yearwood’s identity is established. Read the whole account here. From Think Progress: Aside from the humiliation of getting roughed up by the police, Yearwood said he was extremely disappointed that the incident forced him to miss a speech given by Mustafa Ali, who earlier this year resigned as the head of environmental justice at the Environmental Protection Agency after a 24-year career. Ali now serves as senior vice president of climate, environmental justice, and community revitalization for the Hip Hop Caucus. The Hip Hop Caucus, formed in 2004, seeks to connect marginalized communities with civic matters, focusing in particular on environmental issues. The environmental movement historically has been dominated by white men, although more women have claimed leadership positions over the past decade. More at Think Progress I have to say, that I just can’t imagine this happening at the Minnesota March for Science. There is a huge overlap in who shows up at these events in the Twin Cities, and the events cover everything from economic justice to #BLM to women’s’ rights. It is not in the nature of our community to allow someone to be physically harassed by the police at an event like this, without comment or intervention. Our community has been tested in the past and has done OK in this area, especially since the RNC in Saint Paul when the true potential of a city-wide police state was unleashed on our community, we fought back on several fronts, and changed our culture somewhat. I don’t know anything about the DC environmental community but apparently it is in need of some adjustment. Ours, here in the Twin Cities, probably does too, but this? I don’t think so.


News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Merill Beyeler bears the classic look of a Western rancher. He’s got the leathery face of someone who has spent a lot of time outdoors. He wears flannel shirts, jeans, and a bone-colored cowboy hat. Mr. Beyeler, whose family roots in Idaho’s Lemhi County extend back to the 1850s, is also a rock-ribbed Republican. True, in Idaho, one of the reddest states in the nation, most people are Republican. But in Lemhi County, a hauntingly beautiful expanse of bald, taupe mountains and verdant river valleys wedged up against the Montana border, virtually no one puts a Democratic bumper sticker on his or her pickup. So you’d think that people like Beyeler would be happy at the prospect of the new Trump administration, buttressed by one of the most conservative cabinets in decades, ushering in a dramatic change in the management of public lands in the West. You’d think that they would relish the prospect of federal agencies either opening up more expanses to ranchers and commercial interests or giving more control back to the states. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? While Beyeler occasionally chafes at the way federal lands are managed, he doesn’t want US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land opened up unconditionally to loggers or developers, or – worse – handed over to bureaucrats in Boise and sold off. “The reason you come home is that this is the soul of our people,” he says. “When you look at our public lands in that respect – as an economic driver and as the soul of our state – the idea of losing that, or risking that, is just too great.” As the Trump administration works to fashion an identity in Washington, one of the big questions is how much the federal government will change its stewardship of public lands in the West. With Republicans in control of Congress, many envision a significant shift in access to and development of public expanses similar to what happened under the Reagan administration 35 years ago. They believe it could be one of the signature achievements of the Trump era. A few on the right are even pushing for an outright transfer of some of those lands back to state control. Yet others – including many Republicans – occupy a more pragmatic middle. Like Beyeler, they are looking for a recalibration rather than a land-management revolution. They believe that the natural landscape is as much a part of the region’s identity as coal seams and oil shale and requires at least some federal stewardship. And they believe firmly that public lands need to stay public – not sold off to private interests. When Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R) of Utah recently introduced a bill in Congress to sell 3.3 million acres of federal lands in the West, he was forced to withdraw the legislation days later because of the backlash from his own constituents, many of whom regularly fish for steelhead trout or hunt elk on federal lands. “I’ve been working in this field for 17 years, and no one has ever seen a congressman introduce a bill and then withdraw it within a week,” says Land Tawney, director of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, a nonprofit that fiercely opposed the bill. “The sportsman community is about 70 percent conservative. We’re finding this is a unifying issue, with folks on both sides of the aisle. There can be nothing more American than our public lands.” The land-use decisions of the next four years will have the most impact in places like Lemhi County, which is 92 percent owned by the federal government. Few areas of the United States are more remote than the high desert sagebrush area here. Salmon, the county’s largest town, is 90 miles from a railroad, and 150 miles from an airport, the Interstate, or a Wal-Mart. The county is empty, stark, and stunning. Local ranchers and residents differ – even within families – over how public lands should be managed. But some of them are also working with government officials in a way that could become a model for solving future land wars in the West. The battle over public lands and resources is as old as westward expansion itself. It extends from early fights over mining and water claims in the 1800s to the Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1970s to the anti-Washington “wise-use movement” of the 1980s and ’90s. The only constant in it all is the ebb and flow of tensions between Western residents and the largest landholder, Washington. “The political side of it dates all the way back to the creation of the country,” says Robert Keiter, a law professor at the University of Utah and director of the Wallace Stegner Center for Land, Resources, and the Environment. Last year, simmering frustrations about federal control over Western lands culminated most visibly in the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon by militant ranchers. Yet Westerners’ grievances have been finding an outlet through various assaults in Washington as well. In late April, the Trump administration ordered the Interior Department to review some 30 places that have been designated national monuments over the past 20 years. The White House believes the designations have increasingly set aside more land than was intended under the 1906 Antiquities Act, costing the nation jobs. Environmentalists see the move undermining one of the most important tools for protecting national parks and public lands. The change could affect places such as the Bears Ears National Monument, in the red-rock area of southern Utah, which was protected in the waning days of the Obama administration. Several Utah lawmakers, including Mr. Chaffetz and Republican Rep. Rob Bishop, have been pressing to overturn the designation. (In response, the Outdoor Industry Association pulled a trade show, which brings about $45 million a year to Utah, from Salt Lake City.) Western lawmakers have also been pushing the idea of selling off some public lands to private parties, or transferring them to state ownership. And the Trump administration is trying to repeal a regulation that requires oil and gas firms operating on public lands to control their methane emissions. Behind all the rebellious moves is the size of Washington’s real estate portfolio. The federal government owns 47 percent of all the land in 11 Western states. That ranges from a high of 85 percent in Nevada to a low of 30 percent in Montana. “It’s a long-standing irritation, and at times it becomes more pronounced,” says Lynn Scarlett, global managing director for public policy for The Nature Conservancy and a former deputy Interior secretary under President George W. Bush. Ms. Scarlett says tensions have always simmered over how the federal government manages those lands in regard to energy development, mining, grazing rights, and endangered species. What’s new in the latest backlash, she says, is the focus on the lack of maintenance on public lands, which is largely the result of federal agencies getting less funding. Departments such as the Forest Service, BLM, and US Fish & Wildlife Service had hoped that highlighting the backlog of work would help them garner more funds. Instead, critics have just seized on the maintenance issues to buttress their argument that the federal government isn’t the right steward of public lands. “The bottom line is that we want our public lands to be managed in a way that’s responsible,” says Jennifer Fielder, a Montana state senator and chief executive officer of the American Lands Council, a leader in the call to transfer federal land to state control. “Those of us who live near here are sick of seeing the lock-it-up and let-it-burn policies out of Washington.” Senator Fielder says she watches the ineptitude from her living-room window in Montana. The Feds’ inability or unwillingness to thin underbrush and perform other basic management practices, she says, led to a wildfire last summer becoming much larger, and more expensive, than it needed to be. “Forty thousand acres burnt to a crisp, habitat destroyed,” she says. Others believe that having an absentee landlord isn’t the best way to care for property and that the people closest to the land are the ones who know best how to manage it – and should reap the benefits from it. “Without these lands, you can’t operate as a republican form of government inside your state,” says Jim Chmelik, a former Idaho county commissioner and a leader of the land-transfer movement. “If you don’t have access to your resources, you can’t provide good-paying jobs and you can’t provide a good quality of life.” Yet critics of shifting control to the states believe it will either lead to lands being sold off to private interests or an oil derrick being put on top of every ridge, despoiling the natural beauty that attracts people from around the country – and contributes to regional economies. States also have far fewer resources than Washington to manage the vast public expanses. And most states are required to balance their budgets, which could put pressure on them to sell lands in lean times, even if they vow not to do so. As proof, critics point out that 11 Western states were granted a total of almost 77 million acres of land at statehood. They’ve sold off about 44 percent of those lands. Nevada, granted 2.7 million acres at its founding, now has just 3,000 acres of public state land. “Study after study has shown states can’t afford” to manage public lands well, says Mr. Tawney of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers. Just south of Lehmi lies Custer County – home of some of the most spectacular wilderness in Idaho. The celebrated Middle Fork of the Salmon River flows through the area, and the rugged Sawtooth Mountains rise steeply from the plains. It’s the third largest county in Idaho, but home to barely 4,000 people. Roughly 96 percent of the county is federal land. “Custer County is the size of Connecticut, but we have one sheriff and four deputies,” says Wayne Butts, a county commissioner who has lived in Challis, the county seat, since he was 8. “There’s no tax bases.” Sitting next to the warmth of a wood-burning stove in his small-motor repair shop, he ticks off the economic limitations of living in a remote area: The county has a 100-year-old jail with just six beds in one room, making it impossible to house men and women at the same time. Local roads are in desperate need of repair, but no money exists to fix them. A decrease in grazing rights on federal lands has led to fewer ranchers, resulting in less local revenue. A molybdenum mine, once the county’s largest employer, shut down in 2014. People come from all over the country to hike, fish, and play in Custer County, but don’t add much to the economy, says Mr. Butts: Many of them drive in from Boise, bring their own food and camping supplies. They don’t even buy gas in Custer. “Old-time customs and culture – that’s the way we like it,” says Butts. To him, that means ranching, mining, logging. He’s frustrated that federal lands increasingly seem to be managed to inhibit those activities. Still, despite all those irritations, Butts isn’t willing to back transferring lands to state ownership unless he sees a budget proposal that makes sense to him. He thinks either the state or local communities could do a better job managing the lands, but he is well aware of the costs involved. Instead, he wants to see limits put on turning any more private land into public land and hopes that the Trump administration and Republican Congress will help roll back some of the more onerous environmental protections on federal lands that already exist. A few dozen miles to the east of Challis, in the shadow of Idaho’s tallest peak, Mt. Borah, Steve Smith shares many of Butts’s grievances. Mr. Smith and his parents live on his family’s 2,800-acre ranch, where they have a herd of 400 cows. Just a mention of public lands is enough to set Smith and his father, Wiley, off, venting about their years of vexation in dealing with the BLM and Forest Service. This has included navigating around what they see as burdensome protections for the sage grouse, as well as a BLM water-rights claim that took them years to defeat. Yet even this father and son don’t agree on whether control of public lands should be shifted from Washington to the states. Despite his virulent criticism of federal management, Wiley doesn’t believe states have the resources to care for public lands. Steve would like to see a modest transfer – perhaps 2 percent of total holdings – provided states have a plan for how they will manage the areas. “The ranchers, the miners, the loggers – they’re the ones that have taken care of these areas,” he says. “[Federal officials] put a black mark on those industries and don’t see that [the land] has been in their care for 150 years.” Others are more adamant in their opposition to state control. On a cold, rainy Saturday in March, nearly 3,000 people gathered at the State Capitol in Boise to support public lands staying public – and under federal stewardship. The demonstration attracted plenty of traditional environmentalists, but also hunters, anglers, and dirt-bike riders. “Rednecks and hippies unite!” read one sign. “I fill my freezer on public lands,” said another. In between various chants – such as “Keep public lands in public hands!” – the crowd listened to speakers ranging from a member of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to a fifth-generation Idaho woman who talked of accompanying her mother on her first moose hunt when she was 8 days old. “I hunt and I fish on public lands,” says Travis Long, who came to the rally from Kuna, Idaho, outfitted in camouflage. “I’ve got four kids and I want to make sure public lands remain that way.” It is too early to know what a Trump administration will mean for public lands. Much of the push to undermine the power of federal oversight agencies, or to transfer or sell off public lands, is coming from Congress, and President Trump’s Interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, has repeatedly said he would never transfer or sell them. “I think we’re in a better place with [Mr. Trump and Mr. Zinke] than we would have been with others interviewed for the Interior secretary, or with Ted Cruz,” says Whit Fosburgh, president and chief executive officer of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, a nonprofit that represents sportsmen and sportswomen. At the same time, Mr. Fosburgh and other conservation leaders say they’re concerned about legislation that has been passed or proposed. In March, for instance, the Trump administration rescinded Barack Obama’s three-year moratorium on coal leases on federal land. A proposed bill in Congress would strip the Forest Service and BLM of their law enforcement powers, putting the job of policing environmental and other rules in the hands of local sheriffs. “It’s one more attempt to weaken management of public lands,” says Fosburgh. Trump’s proposed budget also includes a 12 percent cut to the Interior Department, which could make maintenance of public lands even more problematic and give states more leverage in their quest to take over. Eventually, it’s possible that some of the hostility to Washington’s handling of public lands will die down under the new administration. The Sagebrush Rebellion subsided once Reagan came to power. “In the big picture politically, it would not surprise me if [the transfer movement] slowly disappears from the radar screen with Republicans in control of Congress and the White House,” says Mr. Keiter, the Utah law professor. “It works as an oppositional strategy to more progressive or environmentally friendly policies of Democratic administrations.” Perhaps the best hope for ending the standoffs over public lands is a more collaborative approach in the canyons and valley floors of the West itself – far from the politics of Washington and statehouses. One such effort is under way in Salmon, where ranchers, federal agencies, and conservation groups are finding common ground. “What doesn’t get attention is the really good, responsible, productive work taking place on the Western landscape,” says Beyeler, the Lemhi County rancher. At the same time that the Malheur standoff was occurring, he notes, the Forest Service and BLM were working with a local rancher to help him get seven miles of pipeline approved in an area that includes an important salmon spawning tributary. Endangered sockeye salmon travel more than 900 miles, up 6,500 feet of elevation, to spawn in rivers and lakes here. “It was a collaborative process,” says Beyeler. “I worry that this tension on whether the state or federal government should own [public lands] distracts from the collaborative work.” Tom Page, another Salmon Valley rancher, got into ranching in part because he wanted to see if he could do it in a conservation-minded way – and make money. He is surprised by how hard it has been to navigate all the environmental rules and by how difficult lawsuits filed by activists make it for local landowners. The US Forest Service recently denied him approval to put up 200 feet of fencing on his grazing allotment that was intended to keep his cows from straying into restricted forestland. The reason, he says: The fencing would have encroached on fish and sage grouse habitat, and forestry officials knew they would have to produce a “thick document” to justify the fencing and would likely have been sued anyway. The Upper Salmon area, Mr. Page agrees, has become a model for conservation and collaboration – but only because it has nonprofits and both federal and private money helping to support that work. In rural counties with less federal attention, there tends to be a lot less trust, he says. Bob Cope has seen both cooperation and conflict. A large man with a deep voice and earthy sense of humor, he is a veterinarian for all the local ranchers as well as a Lemhi County commissioner. He has served on numerous state and federal committees representing Western interests. With face-to-face collaboration and local involvement, he says public-lands disputes are solvable. But he understands people’s frustrations, especially when they see onerous rules being made by people back East. “We can work with our federal officials, but [local people] get handcuffed,” he says. “We’ve had management by legislation and litigation. There’s still a lot of mistrust on both sides…. People feel like they have no voice.” Over on the 25,000-acre ranch he’s managed for 20 years, Shane Rosenkrance epitomizes the attitude of many people in this part of Idaho. He harbors a deep love for the lands he manages and the public holdings that surround them. Mr. Rosenkrance points to the imposing peaks rising out of the desert floor – the Lost River Range, the Pioneer Mountains, Mt. Borah. He wants them to remain in federal hands and not be sold to individuals who might turn them into their own private preserves. “You can go anywhere you want,” says Rosenkrance, whose family has lived in the valley for seven generations. “Residents appreciate that more than anyone. But we don’t want some guy in New York telling us how to manage these lands, or to lock them up.” Become a part of the Monitor community


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, April 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- George Sanders, President of Goldcliff Resource Corporation (TSX.V:GCN) (OTC PINK:GCFFF) (“the Company”) and Paul Saxton P. Eng., President of Lincoln Mining Corp. (“Lincoln”) are pleased to report that they, as Pine Grove gold joint venture partners, have made significant progress in advancing the permitting of the Pine Grove project, in Lyon County, Nevada. Critical to the overall permitting process is our engagement of Mr. Del Fortner as Director of Permitting and Environmental Compliance. From 2003 to 2006 Mr. Fortner directed the Federal mining program for Nevada as Deputy State Director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Since 2006, Mr. Fortner has been in private practise with an excellent record of advising resource development projects on all aspects of local, state and federal permitting. Mr. Fortner is a graduate of the University of Akron with a BSc. degree in Geology. Mr. Fortner will assist the joint venture in developing the most cost effective and timely strategies for all exploration and mine development permit issues. He will also provide guidance for all communication with environmental consultants, local, state and federal agencies and local stakeholders. Mr. Fortner has already met with the Lincoln exploration team to assist in the preparation of drill permits. The joint venture plans an additional reverse circulation drill program to further expand the new upper zone discovered at the Wilson deposit in the fall 2016 drill program. He will also be meeting with the Lincoln Chief Operating Officer to develop the Plan of Operations permit submission for mine development. As the joint venture moves Pine Grove towards production, we welcome Mr. Fortner’s contribution to the project. Jeffery Wilson, Vice President of Exploration of Lincoln Mining Corporation, and a Qualified Person under NI 43-101 has reviewed, prepared, and approved the scientific technical disclosure contained in this news release. For further information, please contact George W. Sanders, President, at 250-764-8879, toll free at 1-866-769-4802 or email at info@directroyalty.com. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Service Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accept responsibility for the adequacy or the accuracy of this news release.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - May 04, 2017) - Logan Resources Ltd. (TSX VENTURE: LGR) ("Logan" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that the Company has commenced the permitting process for a 5 to 7 hole, 1,800-meter reverse circulation ("RC") drill program at the Antelope Project. Antelope is best described as a sedimentary rock-hosted, Carlin-style gold system. Antelope is subject to the Option Agreement between Logan and Pilot Gold, Inc. ("Pilot"). The property is located in White Pine County, Nevada, approximately 100 kilometers south of Wendover. Four modern gold mines, including Alligator Ridge, Bald Mountain, Golden Butte, and Kinsley Mountain are located within an 80-kilometer radius of these claims. The project consists of 65 unpatented lode claims under BLM jurisdiction. Historic rock chip and soil sampling were conducted by Amselco, Phelps Dodge, and Dumont Nickel*. Amselco and Phelps Dodge together completed 138 shallow drill holes totaling 12,024 meters during the 1980's which targeted outcropping gold mineralization. These programs identified a zone of highly anomalous gold that is approximately 2,000 x 900 meters in extent. Based on the historical data interpretations, the system is open both at depth and to the west. Gold is concentrated in the lower portion of the Pilot Shale in highly silicified sedimentary rocks (jasperoid). Significant concentrations of gold occur in two jasperoid zones which are part of a gently west-dipping sequence of limestone, siltstone and dolomite. Tertiary igneous rocks are present as narrow, northwest trending quartz monzonite dikes. Gold grades are elevated along dike/sediment contacts as well as in proximity to steep, northwest-striking faults. The jasperoid targets project down-dip under shallow cover to the west, where gravity data suggests that the pediment cover remains shallow for at least 1 kilometer. Geologic potential also exists at depth beneath very shallow historic drilling, where interpreted low angle normal faults allow for thinning and/or repetition of stratigraphy. A 5 to 7 hole, 1,800-meter RC drill program has been designed to confirm results from selected historic drill holes and to test the northwest extension of near-surface mineralization. *Although all of the data was developed prior to the requirements of National Instrument 43-101, the companies and analytical labs involved in the work are established and reputable firms, and Logan deems the historical data suitable to develop interpretive drill targets and to guide future exploration. The technical information within this document has been reviewed and approved by Dr. Craig S. Bow, Vice President Exploration for Logan. Dr. Bow is a Qualified Person as defined in National Instrument 43-101. Dr. Bow has verified the data underlying the exploration results disclosed in this news release. Logan Resources Ltd. (TSX VENTURE: LGR) is a junior exploration company in the business of acquiring and advancing mineral properties. Logan's focus is on actively exploring nine gold properties in Nevada and Utah, USA that are under option from Pilot Gold Inc. Logan also has a 20% carried interest in the Gorilla Lake uranium property, and has a 100% interest in the Redford iron ore property on Vancouver Island, Canada. Redford is a former producing iron ore mine. For more information, please visit www.loganresources.ca. www.kingandbay.com - Logan is part of the King & Bay West group of companies. King & Bay West is a merchant bank and management services company that specializes in identifying, funding, developing and managing growth opportunities in the resource and technology sectors. This news release contains "forward-looking information" concerning anticipated developments and events that may occur in the future. Forward looking information contained in this news release includes, but is not limited to, statements with respect to (i) the exploration potential and prospective nature of the properties disclosed in this news release, (ii) the details of future exploration plans and potential results, and (iii) potential gold mineralization on the properties. In certain cases, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of words such as "plans", "expects" or "does not expect", "is expected", "budget", "scheduled", "estimates", "forecasts", "intends", "anticipates" or "does not anticipate", or "believes", or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results "may", "could", "would", "might" or "will be taken", "occur" or "be achieved" suggesting future outcomes, or other expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, assumptions, intentions or statements about future events or performance. Forward-looking information contained in this news release is based on certain factors and assumptions regarding, among other things, the estimation of mineral resources, the realization of resource and reserve estimates, gold and other commodity prices, the timing and amount of future exploration and development expenditures, the estimation of labour and operating costs, the availability of necessary financing and materials to continue to explore and develop the Company's properties in the short and long-term and to acquire new properties, the progress of exploration and development activities, the receipt of necessary regulatory approvals, the estimation of insurance coverage, and assumptions with respect to currency fluctuations, environmental risks, title disputes or claims, and other similar matters. While the Company considers these assumptions to be reasonable based on information currently available to it, they may prove to be incorrect. Forward looking information involves known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking information. Such factors include risks inherent in the exploration and development of mineral deposits, risks relating to variations in mineral resources, grade or recovery rates resulting from current exploration and development activities, risks relating to the ability to access infrastructure, risks relating to changes in gold and other commodity prices and the worldwide demand for and supply of gold and related products, risks related to increased competition in the market for gold and related products and in the mining industry generally, risks related to current global financial conditions, uncertainties inherent in the estimation of mineral resources, access and supply risks, reliance on key personnel, operational risks inherent in the conduct of mining activities, including the risk of accidents, labour disputes, increases in capital and operating costs and the risk of delays or increased costs that might be encountered during the development process, regulatory risks, including risks relating to the acquisition of the necessary licenses and permits, financing, capitalization and liquidity risks, including the risk that the financing necessary to fund the exploration and development activities on the Company's properties, or to acquire new properties, may not be available on satisfactory terms, or at all, risks related to disputes concerning property titles and interest, environmental risks and the additional risks identified in the "Risk Factors" section of the Company's reports and filings with applicable Canadian securities regulators. Although the Company has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual actions, events or results to differ materially from those described in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause actions, events or results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. The forward-looking information is made as of the date of this news release. Except as required by applicable securities laws, the Company does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking information. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) has reviewed or accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - May 1, 2017) - West Kirkland Mining Inc. (TSX VENTURE:WKM)(OTCQB:WKLDF) ("West Kirkland" or the "Company") today announces that a Limited Liability Corporation Agreement (the "LLC Agreement") governing the Hasbrouck Gold Project (the "Hasbrouck Project"), located near Tonopah, Nevada has been executed between the Company and Clover Nevada LLC, a Nevada limited liability company and 100% subsidiary of Waterton Precious Metals Fund II Cayman, LP ("Waterton"), who acquired a 25% interest in the Hasbrouck Project in 2015. West Kirkland owns a 75% interest and is the operator of the Hasbrouck Project. The LLC Agreement formally ratifies the relationship between the two owners. Under the terms of the LLC agreement Waterton is required to fund their 25% share of expenditures on the Hasbrouck Project incurred subsequent to September 1, 2016. Waterton has indicated their intention to fund their 25% share of expenditures. However, should Waterton choose not to fund their share of expenditures, their interest will be diluted according to a prescribed formula in the LLC agreement. The Hasbrouck Gold Project has received all the permits to construct and operate the first phase of the open pit, heap leach gold recovery operation at the Three Hills pit. Work continues on the permitting for the second phase of the project at the larger Hasbrouck pit. A 2015 Pre-Feasibility Study estimated open pit reserves for the Hasbrouck Project. The mineral resource and reserve estimate was prepared in conformance with NI 43-101 by Mine Development Associates ("MDA"). Proven and Probable reserves (based on 100% of the project) total 45.3 million tons containing 762,000 ounces gold and 10.6 million ounces silver as detailed below: Hasbrouck Gold Project consists of two all-oxide gold-silver deposits eight kilometers apart. Both deposits will be mined in open pits having low stripping ratios and minimal pre-stripping should the project proceed to production. West Kirkland's independent consultants, MDA, produced an updated Pre-feasibility Study in September 2016 which is available on SEDAR and at www.wkmining.com. All necessary permits to construct and operate the Three Hills Mine are in hand, and work to obtain permits for the Hasbrouck Mine is ongoing, with submission of a Plan of Operation to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) targeted for Q4, 2017. R. Michael Jones, P.Eng, CEO for West Kirkland Mining is a non-independent Qualified Person as defined by NI 43-101. He has reviewed the information contained in this news release and has verified the data by hiring qualified geologists and engineers and has completed a review of the detailed technical information. Mineral reserve information in this news release has been developed and approved by Thomas L. Dyer, P.E., of MDA following CIM standards. West Kirkland Mining utilizes a well-documented system of inserting blanks and standards into the assay stream and has a strict chain of custody. Assays are completed at independent laboratories which have internal quality assurance and quality control systems and procedures. Assays were performed by ALS Chemex Labs Ltd., by fire assay and ICP methods. West Kirkland owns a 75% interest in the Hasbrouck Gold Project in Tonopah, Nevada. A Pre-feasibility Study with construction-level drawings and all federal and state permits for the phase-one Three Hills Mine provides a ready-to-construct project. Drilling for potential expansion is underway. West Kirkland also holds a 60% interest in the open pit heap-leach TUG Gold Project in Utah in joint venture with Newmont. On behalf of West Kirkland Mining Inc. For further information, please see the Company's website at www.wkmining.com or contact us by email at info@wkmining.com. This press release contains forward-looking information or forward-looking statements (collectively "forward-looking information") within the meaning of applicable securities laws. Forward-looking information is typically identified by words such as: "believe", "expect", "anticipate", "intend", "estimate", "postulate" and similar expressions, or are those, which, by their nature, refer to future events. Forward-looking information in this news release includes, without limitation, the completion of the Prefeasibility Study, the project approach of the Prefeasibility Study and exploration and all information under the heading "Prefeasibility Study Detail", including the Prefeasibility Study budget. Although West Kirkland believes that such timing and expenses as set out in this press release are reasonable, it can give no assurance that such expectations and estimates will prove to be correct. The Company cautions investors that any forward-looking information provided by the Company is not a guarantee of future results or performance, and that actual results may differ materially from those in forward-looking information as a result of various factors, including, but not limited to, the state of the financial markets for the Company's equity securities, the state of the market for gold or other minerals that may be produced generally, variations in the nature, quality and quantity of any mineral deposits that may be located, the Company's ability to obtain any necessary permits, consents or authorizations required for its activities, to raise the necessary capital or to be fully able to implement its business strategies and other risks associated with the exploration and development of mineral properties. The reader is referred to the Company's public filings for a more complete discussion of such risk factors and their potential effects which may be accessed through the Company's profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

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