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Reeves S.,University of Nottingham | Greiffenhagen C.,Loughborough University | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | And 3 more authors.
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2015

We present a study of a mixed reality game called 'I'd Hide You' that involves live video streaming from the city streets. We chart the significant challenges facing performers on the streets who must simultaneously engage in the game, stream compelling video footage featuring themselves, and interact with a remote online audience. We reveal how these street performers manage four key tensions: Between their body and camera; between the demands of online audiences and what takes place on-thestreet; between what appears 'frontstage' on camera versus what happens 'backstage'; and balancing being a player of the game with being a performer. By reflecting on how they achieve this, we are able to draw out wider lessons for future interfaces aimed at supporting people broadcasting video of themselves to online audiences while engaged in games, sports and other demanding real-world activities. © Copyright 2015 ACM.


Tolmie P.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Brundell P.,University of Nottingham | And 4 more authors.
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2012

This paper uses a detailed ethnographic study of an ambulatory experience, where participants were invited to explore the perspective of two notorious terrorists, in order to discuss the nature of instruction-giving and, most particularly, the methodical ways in which such instructions are complied with. Four distinct layers of compliance are identified, as are three different kinds of accountability, all of which stand potentially at odds with one another. The paper examines the tensions created by this, tensions that are further aggravated by instructions usually being delivered down a thin channel, with considerable surrounding contextual complexity and little opportunity for repair, and uncovers some core challenges for future design in relation to providing instructions for, and orchestrating a range of possible activities. Copyright 2012 ACM.


Chamberlain A.,University of Nottingham | Oppermann L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | And 6 more authors.
Personal and Ubiquitous Computing | Year: 2011

Touring location-based experiences is challenging, as both content and underlying location services must be adapted to each new setting. A study of a touring performance called Rider Spoke as it visited three different cities reveals how professional artists developed a novel approach to these challenges in which users drove the co-evolution of content and the underlying location service as they explored each new city. We show how the artists iteratively developed filtering, survey, visualization, and simulation tools and processes to enable them to tune the experience to the local characteristics of each city. Our study reveals how by paying attention to both content and infrastructure issues in tandem, the artists were able to create a powerful user experience that has since toured to many different cities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag London Limited.


Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Crabtree A.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Greenhalgh C.,University of Nottingham | And 6 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2011

An ethnographic study reveals how professional artists created a spectator interface for the interactive game Day of the Figurines, designing the size, shape, height and materials of two tabletop interfaces before carefully arranging them in a local setting. We also show how participants experienced this interface. We consider how the artists worked with a multi-scale notion of interactional trajectory that combined trajectories through individual displays, trajectories through a local ecology of displays, and trajectories through an entire experience. Our findings shed light on discussions within HCI concerning interaction with tangible and tabletop displays, spectator interfaces, ecologies of displays, and trajectories through cultural experiences. © 2011 ACM.


Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Greenhalgh C.,University of Nottingham | Crabtree A.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | And 8 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2013

We explore the approach of performance-led research in the wild in which artists drive the creation of novel performances with the support of HCI researchers that are then deployed and studied at public performance in cultural settings such as galleries, festivals and on the city streets. We motivate the approach and then describe how it consists of three distinct activities - practice, studies and theory - that are interleaved in complex ways through nine different relationships. We present a historical account of how the approach has evolved over a fifteen-year period, charting the evolution of a complex web of projects, papers, and relationships between them. We articulate the challenges of pursuing each activity as well as overarching challenges of balancing artistic and research interests, flexible management of relationships, and finally ethics. © 2013 ACM.

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