Portslade, United Kingdom
Portslade, United Kingdom

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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2012

Over the last decade, the creative industries have been revolutionised by the Internet and the digital economy. The UK, already punching above its weight in the global cultural market, stands at a pivotal moment where it is well placed to build a cultural, business and regulatory infrastructure in which first movers as significant as Google, Facebook, Amazon or iTunes may emerge and flourish, driving new jobs and industry. However, for some creators and rightsholders the transition from analogue to digital has been as problematic as it has been promising. Cultural heritage institutions are also struggling to capitalise upon new revenue streams that digitisation appears to offer, while maintaining their traditional roles. Policymakers are hampered by a lack of consensus across stakeholders and confused by partisan evidence lacking robust foundations. Research in conjunction with industry is needed to address these problems and provide support for legislators. CREATe will tackle this regulatory and business crisis, helping the UK creative industry and arts sectors survive, grow and become global innovation pioneers, with an ambitious programme of research delivered by an interdisciplinary team (law, business, economics, technology, psychology and cultural analysis) across 7 universities. CREATe aims to act as an honest broker, using open and transparent methods throughout to provide robust evidence for policymakers and legislators which can benefit all stakeholders. CREATe will do this by: - focussing on studying and collaborating with SMEs and individual creators as the incubators of innovation; - identifying good, bad and emergent business models: which business models can survive the transition to the digital?, which cannot?, and which new models can succeed and scale to drive growth and jobs in the creative economy, as well as supporting the public sector in times of recession?; - examining empirically how far copyright in its current form really does incentivise or reward creative work, especially at the SME/micro level, as well as how far innovation may come from open business models and the informal economy; - monitoring copyright reform initiatives in Europe, at WIPO and other international fora to assess how they impact on the UK and on our work; - using technology as a solution not a problem: by creating pioneering platforms and tools to aid creators and users, using open standards and released under open licences; - examining how to increase and derive revenues from the user contribution to the creative economy in an era of social media, mash-up, data mining and prosumers; - assessing the role of online intermediaries such as ISPs, social networks and mobile operators to see if they encourage or discourage the production and distribution of cultural goods, and what role they should play in enforcing copyright. Given the important governing role of these bodies should they be subject to regulation like public bodies, and if so, how?; - consider throughout this work how the public interest and human rights, such as freedom of expression, privacy, and access to knowledge for the socially or physically excluded, may be affected either positively or negatively by new business models and new ways to enforce copyright. To investigate these issues our work will be arranged into seven themes: SMEs and good, bad and emergent business models; Open business models; Regulation and enforcement; Creators and creative practice; Online intermediaries and physical and virtual platforms; User creation, behaviour and norms; and, Human rights and the public interest. Our deliverables across these themes will be drawn together to inform a Research Blueprint for the UK Creative Economy to be launched in October 2016.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: CULT-COOP-08-2016 | Award Amount: 2.44M | Year: 2017

A main challenge with the development of virtual museums is establishing meaningful user experiences that allow for personal, complex and emotional encounters with art and cultural heritage. The GIFT project suggests creating meaningful personalization through digital gifting and emotional appropriation: Designs for allowing visitors to create their own museum tours as digital mixtapes, and to play with technologies that measure emotional responses to artwork as a playful reappropriation of museum spaces. We aim to accommodate the complex ways in which users may confront art and heritage content, and engage users to participate and share experiences that are emotionally poignant and personally profound. Through multidisciplinary, practice-based research we will develop, test and validate two ground-breaking prototypes for digital encounters with cultural heritage. From this process we will develop a framework with theory, tools, design guidelines and best practice recommendations for creating meaningful personalization of hybrid virtual museum experiences. The GIFT consortium includes leading artists and researchers with a long history of successful collaborations, who will be working with a panel of 10 lead users from prominent European museums, to develop theoretical and practical advances with great impact for the cultural heritage sector and European society. By enabling more engaging hybrid virtual/physical museum experiences, we will contribute to increasing citizens curiosity and engagement. The hybrid format will also help make both virtual museum experiences as well as physical visits more engaging and attractive, thus contributing to economic growth through ticket sales as well as digital sales. By providing frameworks that help non-technical experts in the heritage sector to build and experiment with meaningful personalization of digital cultural heritage, the project gives the sector tools to build and innovate further.


Oppermann L.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Reeves S.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | And 5 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2011

Touring location-based experiences is challenging as both content and underlying location-services must be adapted to each new setting. A study of a touring performance called Rider Spoke as it visited three different cities reveals how professional artists developed a novel approach to these challenges in which users drove the co-evolution of content and the underlying location-service as they explored each new city. We show how the artists iteratively developed filtering, survey, visualization and simulation tools and processes to enable them to tune the experience to the local characteristics of each city. Our study reveals how by paying attention to both content and infrastructure issues in tandem the artists were able to create a powerful user experience that has since toured to many different cities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Greenhalgh C.,University of Nottingham | Anderson B.,University of Nottingham | Jacobs R.,University of Nottingham | And 9 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2015

We explore the ethical implications of HCI's turn to the 'cultural'. This is motivated by an awareness of how cultural applications, in our case interactive performances, raise ethical issues that may challenge established research ethics processes. We review research ethics, HCI's engagement with ethics and the ethics of theatrical performance. Following an approach grounded in Responsible Research Innovation, we present the findings from a workshop in which artists, curators, commissioners, and researchers explored ethical challenges revealed by four case studies. We identify six ethical challenges for HCI's engagement with cultural applications: transgression, boundaries, consent, withdrawal, data, and integrity. We discuss two broader implications of these: managing tensions between multiple overlapping ethical frames; and the importance of managing ethical challenges during and after an experience as well as beforehand. Finally, we discuss how our findings extend previous discussions of Value Sensitive Design in HCI. © 2015 ACM.


Tolmie P.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Brundell P.,University of Nottingham | And 4 more authors.
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2012

This paper uses a detailed ethnographic study of an ambulatory experience, where participants were invited to explore the perspective of two notorious terrorists, in order to discuss the nature of instruction-giving and, most particularly, the methodical ways in which such instructions are complied with. Four distinct layers of compliance are identified, as are three different kinds of accountability, all of which stand potentially at odds with one another. The paper examines the tensions created by this, tensions that are further aggravated by instructions usually being delivered down a thin channel, with considerable surrounding contextual complexity and little opportunity for repair, and uncovers some core challenges for future design in relation to providing instructions for, and orchestrating a range of possible activities. Copyright 2012 ACM.


Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Greenhalgh C.,University of Nottingham | Crabtree A.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | And 8 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2013

We explore the approach of performance-led research in the wild in which artists drive the creation of novel performances with the support of HCI researchers that are then deployed and studied at public performance in cultural settings such as galleries, festivals and on the city streets. We motivate the approach and then describe how it consists of three distinct activities - practice, studies and theory - that are interleaved in complex ways through nine different relationships. We present a historical account of how the approach has evolved over a fifteen-year period, charting the evolution of a complex web of projects, papers, and relationships between them. We articulate the challenges of pursuing each activity as well as overarching challenges of balancing artistic and research interests, flexible management of relationships, and finally ethics. © 2013 ACM.


Chamberlain A.,University of Nottingham | Oppermann L.,Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | And 6 more authors.
Personal and Ubiquitous Computing | Year: 2011

Touring location-based experiences is challenging, as both content and underlying location services must be adapted to each new setting. A study of a touring performance called Rider Spoke as it visited three different cities reveals how professional artists developed a novel approach to these challenges in which users drove the co-evolution of content and the underlying location service as they explored each new city. We show how the artists iteratively developed filtering, survey, visualization, and simulation tools and processes to enable them to tune the experience to the local characteristics of each city. Our study reveals how by paying attention to both content and infrastructure issues in tandem, the artists were able to create a powerful user experience that has since toured to many different cities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag London Limited.


Benford S.,University of Nottingham | Crabtree A.,University of Nottingham | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Greenhalgh C.,University of Nottingham | And 6 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2011

An ethnographic study reveals how professional artists created a spectator interface for the interactive game Day of the Figurines, designing the size, shape, height and materials of two tabletop interfaces before carefully arranging them in a local setting. We also show how participants experienced this interface. We consider how the artists worked with a multi-scale notion of interactional trajectory that combined trajectories through individual displays, trajectories through a local ecology of displays, and trajectories through an entire experience. Our findings shed light on discussions within HCI concerning interaction with tangible and tabletop displays, spectator interfaces, ecologies of displays, and trajectories through cultural experiences. © 2011 ACM.


Reeves S.,University of Nottingham | Greiffenhagen C.,Loughborough University | Flintham M.,University of Nottingham | Benford S.,University of Nottingham | And 3 more authors.
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2015

We present a study of a mixed reality game called 'I'd Hide You' that involves live video streaming from the city streets. We chart the significant challenges facing performers on the streets who must simultaneously engage in the game, stream compelling video footage featuring themselves, and interact with a remote online audience. We reveal how these street performers manage four key tensions: Between their body and camera; between the demands of online audiences and what takes place on-thestreet; between what appears 'frontstage' on camera versus what happens 'backstage'; and balancing being a player of the game with being a performer. By reflecting on how they achieve this, we are able to draw out wider lessons for future interfaces aimed at supporting people broadcasting video of themselves to online audiences while engaged in games, sports and other demanding real-world activities. © Copyright 2015 ACM.

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