Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital

Blackpool, United Kingdom

Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital

Blackpool, United Kingdom
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Lawal K.O.,Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital | Clayson A.D.,Wrightington Hospital | Charalambous C.P.,Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2013

Open book injury is usually a result of a high-energy force. We present such an injury sustained as a result of a fall while doing the splits. In our case, a successful outcome was achieved by non-surgical treatment, as the patient was haemodynamically stable. Copyright 2013 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Lebari D.,Whitegate Health Center | Gohil J.,University of Liverpool | Patnaik L.,Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital | Wasef W.,Whitegate Health Center
International Journal of STD and AIDS | Year: 2014

Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining condition. Typically, KS affects the skin with or without visceral involvement. The extensive use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has decreased the incidence of KS amongst the HIV-positive population. We report a case of a 40-year-old man with HIV-1 infection with CD4 count of 551 cells/mm3 and an undetectable viral load who presented with two skin-coloured KS lesions on the prepuce of the penis. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. He had been commenced on ART three years earlier with a nadir CD4 count of 255 cells/mm3. He had achieved and maintained viral suppression since commencing ART. The patient was initially treated with cryotherapy and 5% imiquimod as the lesions were presumed to be warts. The lack of response to treatment prompted further investigation. We carried out a literature search of published cases of penile KS over the past 10 years. The majority of articles regarding penile KS were published in the pre-ART era and involved patients with AIDS. Over the past 10 years, published cases of penile KS have almost exclusively been in HIV-negative men. We found 10 published cases of penile KS in HIV-negative men and only one other published case of penile KS in a HIV-positive man, who had severe immune suppression with CD4 count below 200 cells/mm3. This is the first case report to describe a HIV-positive patient stable on ART with a CD4 count above 200 cells/mm3 and suppressed HIV-1 viral load, to develop two KS lesions on the penis. Clinicians have to remain suspicious of penile lesions and appreciate the crucial role a biopsy with histopathological analysis plays in confirming a diagnosis. In addition, this case illustrates that unusual presentations of KS can still occur in treated HIV-positive patients with sustained immune recovery. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.


PubMed | Whitegate Health Center, University of Liverpool and Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: International journal of STD & AIDS | Year: 2016

Kaposis sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining condition. Typically, KS affects the skin with or without visceral involvement. The extensive use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has decreased the incidence of KS amongst the HIV-positive population. We report a case of a 40-year-old man with HIV-1 infection with CD4 count of 551 cells/mm(3)and an undetectable viral load who presented with two skin-coloured KS lesions on the prepuce of the penis. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. He had been commenced on ART three years earlier with a nadir CD4 count of 255 cells/mm(3) He had achieved and maintained viral suppression since commencing ART. The patient was initially treated with cryotherapy and 5% imiquimod as the lesions were presumed to be warts. The lack of response to treatment prompted further investigation. We carried out a literature search of published cases of penile KS over the past 10 years. The majority of articles regarding penile KS were published in the pre-ART era and involved patients with AIDS. Over the past 10 years, published cases of penile KS have almost exclusively been in HIV-negative men. We found 10 published cases of penile KS in HIV-negative men and only one other published case of penile KS in a HIV-positive man, who had severe immune suppression with CD4 count below 200 cells/mm(3) This is the first case report to describe a HIV-positive patient stable on ART with a CD4 count above 200 cells/mm(3)and suppressed HIV-1 viral load, to develop two KS lesions on the penis. Clinicians have to remain suspicious of penile lesions and appreciate the crucial role a biopsy with histopathological analysis plays in confirming a diagnosis. In addition, this case illustrates that unusual presentations of KS can still occur in treated HIV-positive patients with sustained immune recovery.


Marullo A.G.M.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Irace F.G.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Vitulli P.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Peruzzi M.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 8 more authors.
BioMed Research International | Year: 2015

Intraluminal aortic clamping has been achieved until now by means of a sophisticated device consisting of a three-lumen catheter named Endoclamp, which allows at the same time occlusion of the aorta, antegrade delivering of cardioplegia, and venting through the aortic root. This tool has shown important advantages allowing aortic occlusion and perfusate delivering without a direct contact with ascending aorta reducing meanwhile the risk of traumatic and/or iatrogenic injuries. Recently, a new device (Intraclude catheter) with the same characteristics and properties has been proposed and introduced in clinical practice. The aim of this paper is to investigate the differences between Endoclamp and Intraclude catheters and to analyze the advantages advocated by this new device for intraluminal aortic occlusion since it is noticeable as these new technological tools are gaining more and more attractiveness due to their appraised clinical efficacy. © 2015 Antonino G. M. Marullo et al.


PubMed | University of Rome La Sapienza, Ospedale dellAngelo and Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital
Type: | Journal: BioMed research international | Year: 2015

Intraluminal aortic clamping has been achieved until now by means of a sophisticated device consisting of a three-lumen catheter named Endoclamp, which allows at the same time occlusion of the aorta, antegrade delivering of cardioplegia, and venting through the aortic root. This tool has shown important advantages allowing aortic occlusion and perfusate delivering without a direct contact with ascending aorta reducing meanwhile the risk of traumatic and/or iatrogenic injuries. Recently, a new device (Intraclude catheter) with the same characteristics and properties has been proposed and introduced in clinical practice. The aim of this paper is to investigate the differences between Endoclamp and Intraclude catheters and to analyze the advantages advocated by this new device for intraluminal aortic occlusion since it is noticeable as these new technological tools are gaining more and more attractiveness due to their appraised clinical efficacy.


Lawal K.O.,Blackpool Victoria Teaching Hospital
BMJ case reports | Year: 2013

Open book injury is usually a result of a high-energy force. We present such an injury sustained as a result of a fall while doing the splits. In our case, a successful outcome was achieved by non-surgical treatment, as the patient was haemodynamically stable.

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