Spearfish, SD, United States

Black Hills State University

www.bhsu.edu
Spearfish, SD, United States

Black Hills State University is the U.S. state of South Dakota's third largest comprehensive public university, offering both undergraduate and graduate programs. The 123-acre campus is located in Spearfish. Close to 5,000 students attend classes at this campus, as well as sites in Rapid City, Pierre, Yankton, Sioux Falls, and through distance offerings. Enrollment comes from nearly every county in South Dakota, 44 states, and 13 countries. BHSU is governed by the South Dakota Board of Regents. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

GenPro Energy Solutions announced that electric industry veteran Lee DeLange has joined the company as chief operating officer. Piedmont, SD, November 03, 2016 --( “I’m very grateful to be joining the GenPro team,” DeLange said. “I have had great respect for GenPro’s success over the years, and I look forward to helping the company grow.” DeLange’s career includes 23 years with Rapid City-based Black Hills Energy, most recently as manager of the Energy Services and Customer Operations team where he managed commercial and industrial accounts, energy efficiency programs, and customer solution teams for Black Hills Energy. He has a Bachelor of Applied Technical Sciences degree from Black Hills State University, and a computer-aided drafting degree from Western Dakota Technical Institute. As chief operations officer, DeLange will be responsible for leading a growing team of innovative energy professionals, implementing and managing operational controls, and assisting in the thoughtful and effective growth of the company. DeLange is active in the Black Hills community, serving on chamber boards, economic development boards and other non-profit organizations. He was accepted in Leadership South Dakota in 2016, and he is an elder and board member at Rimrock Evangelical Free Church. He and his wife, Amy, live near Nemo. They have three children. About GenPro GenPro Energy Solutions was founded in 2003 by Dwight Patterson. In the early days, the company provided solar-powered livestock watering systems to area farms and ranches. Today, GenPro is one of the largest distributors and integrators of renewable energy systems in the Midwest. GenPro also specializes in energy efficient lighting technologies and controls, solar irrigation, power generation and backup systems. GenPro consults with municipalities and utilities companies throughout North America on how to integrate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies into their current systems. Piedmont, SD, November 03, 2016 --( PR.com )-- GenPro Energy Solutions announced that electric industry veteran Lee DeLange has joined the company as chief operating officer.“I’m very grateful to be joining the GenPro team,” DeLange said. “I have had great respect for GenPro’s success over the years, and I look forward to helping the company grow.”DeLange’s career includes 23 years with Rapid City-based Black Hills Energy, most recently as manager of the Energy Services and Customer Operations team where he managed commercial and industrial accounts, energy efficiency programs, and customer solution teams for Black Hills Energy.He has a Bachelor of Applied Technical Sciences degree from Black Hills State University, and a computer-aided drafting degree from Western Dakota Technical Institute.As chief operations officer, DeLange will be responsible for leading a growing team of innovative energy professionals, implementing and managing operational controls, and assisting in the thoughtful and effective growth of the company.DeLange is active in the Black Hills community, serving on chamber boards, economic development boards and other non-profit organizations. He was accepted in Leadership South Dakota in 2016, and he is an elder and board member at Rimrock Evangelical Free Church. He and his wife, Amy, live near Nemo. They have three children.About GenProGenPro Energy Solutions was founded in 2003 by Dwight Patterson. In the early days, the company provided solar-powered livestock watering systems to area farms and ranches. Today, GenPro is one of the largest distributors and integrators of renewable energy systems in the Midwest. GenPro also specializes in energy efficient lighting technologies and controls, solar irrigation, power generation and backup systems. GenPro consults with municipalities and utilities companies throughout North America on how to integrate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies into their current systems. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from GenPro Energy Solutions


Stoltenberg S.F.,Black Hills State University | Vandever J.M.,Black Hills State University
Neuropharmacology | Year: 2010

Decisions made under ambiguity may involve a different genetic architecture than those made under risk. Because gender moderates the effect of genetic polymorphisms on serotonin function and because there are gender differences in decision-making, the present study examined potential gender moderation of associations between polymorphisms in important serotonin system candidate genes (serotonin transporter [SLC6A4] and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 [TPH2]) and performance on a decision-making task (Iowa Gambling Task, IGT) in healthy, adults (N = 188; 62% women). Subjects were genotyped for the well-studied SLC6A4 promoter variant 5-HTTLPR and a TPH2 single nucleotide polymorphism in intron-8 (rs1386438). Genotype at rs1386438 was not associated with performance on the IGT. A significant gender by 5-HTTLPR genotype interaction effect was detected when decision-making was under ambiguity (i.e. the first block of 20 choices), but not under risk (blocks 2-5). Performance on the first block of 20 choices was not correlated with performance on subsequent blocks, supporting the interpretation that early performance on the IGT indexes decision-making under ambiguity, while performance on blocks 2-5 indexes decision-making under risk. These findings suggest that decision-making under ambiguity and risk may have different genetic architectures and that individual differences in decision-making under ambiguity are associated with genetic variation in SLC6A4. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Owen L.,Black Hills State University
Feminism and Psychology | Year: 2012

Traditional narratives about fat experiences often exclude tangible, lived experiences in favor of examining fatness as a social and interpersonal symbol. In order to expand considerations of what it means to literally be fat, I use information from interviews, personal journals, and ethnographic research to explore how fat persons experience and navigate their daily, spatial worlds. Key to my analysis is an exploration of the concept of spatial discrimination, or experiencing the physical and emotional effects of living in a world designed with smaller bodies in mind. I propose spatial discrimination as a form of microaggression, a type of discrimination that implicitly, and through a myriad small words and examples, derides the physicalities and identities of marginalized persons. Finally, I explore three common, social psychological methods of coping with spatial discrimination: withdrawal, invisibility, and disembodiment, all of which illustrate fat persons' adaptations to moving through physical spaces that implicitly exclude them. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Activities in Phys | Award Amount: 76.10K | Year: 2016

Black Hills State University (BHSU) will host a 10-week Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program centered on underground science at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). This program will recruit 6-8 undergraduate students each year to participate in exciting underground research projects as well as professional development, social and outreach activities. Underground science offers possibilities for research across a variety of disciplines including physics, chemistry and biology. Recruitment efforts of the BHSU REU site will be especially focused on American Indian, female and community college students.

Some of the most important physics experiments of our time are currently in operation at SURF, searching for dark matter and investigating properties of the neutrino. Students will be offered the opportunity to engage in research related to these experiments by assaying materials for radiopurity measurements, using Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effect of those materials on detectors and testing the chemical purity of noble gases. Additionally, research at SURF is being carried out in the study of life deep underground, with applications to medicine and astrobiology, in particular in the diversity of microbial environments and in the isolation of novel microbes. Complementary chemistry research will also be performed to determine the local environment in which these microbes live.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY | Award Amount: 143.79K | Year: 2014

Nearly all animals are diploid, i.e., they have two sets of chromosomes. In contrast, many plants are polyploid and have four or more sets of chromosomes, yet the role of polyploidy in speciation remains sharply debated. Polyploid plants that cannot interbreed with diploid plants are rarely recognized as different species, in large part because it is uncertain whether diploids and polyploids are ecologically distinct. This project combines field observations and transplant experiments to investigate reproductive barriers between diploid and polyploid populations of wild yarrow, a native perennial wildflower, and rigorously test the nature of polyploid speciation. The project will use naturally-occurring polyploid lineages and new polyploid mutants that arise spontaneously within diploid populations to separate the effects of ecological divergence and ploidy-based barriers on reproductive isolation.

This project has broad implications for the interpretation of global biodiversity patterns. Taxonomic recognition of polyploids, which are common at high latitudes, could double the number of flowering plant species and fundamentally alter understanding of species diversity, which is generally thought to be greatest in tropical regions. This project will involve faculty and graduate students not only in the laboratory and field research, but also in development of a public education and outreach program on urban forests and their conservation. Urban forests provide critical habitat for wildlife as well as recreational opportunities for urban and suburban citizens, yet are increasingly threatened by habitat fragmentation and invasive organisms. The project will develop urban forests as sites of formal and informal biology education and as a public resource.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 65.32K | Year: 2012

This award supports the continuing research program at Black Hills State University in underground astrophysics research. The focus is mainly on dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments planned for the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) at Homestake, SD. For the dark matter experiments, DARKSIDE and MAX, BHSU is designing, building, and optimizing a continuous wave custom cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) system for measuring the level of impurities in argon gas. This is important for the success of the depleted argon-based dark matter detectors. With this award the BHSU group expects to improve upon the sensitivity of commercial CRDS systems by at least an order of magnitude. The BHSU group will setup the facilities needed to clean the ancient lead bricks to be used for shielding the double-beta decay experiment, MAJORANA.

Broader impacts: Every summer the BHSU group involves South Dakota undergraduates in hands-on research. The BHSU QuarkNet Center, established in 2009, is one of the most active QuarkNet Centers in the country. Last year five teachers brought about 30 students to participate in an LHC Masterclass held at Homestake. As the group enters their 4th year, they expect to add about four new teachers to the Center. In addition, the BHSU group is working with representatives from Oglala Lakota College, in an effort to establish the first QuarkNet Center at a Tribal College or University (TCU).


This Black Hills State University project builds on previously successful efforts to decrease attrition in pre-STEM mathematics courses and positions the university to investigate those variables in the teaching and learning process that are most influential in successful remediation within a developmental mathematics sequence. The goal is to determine what works in learning developmental mathematics by analyzing the results obtained after restructuring basic and intermediate algebra courses at Black Hills State University. Beneficial applications are translatable to all STEM disciplines, and especially to projects serving underrepresented students. This potential is underscored and expected as there already have been increases in student success achieved by the program in key pre-university level mathematics courses.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2014

Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a technique which allows users to measure concentrations of rare elements with superior sensitivity. With many applications in a wide range of scientific fields, this fast, multi-element technique has become an indispensable tool in trace elemental analysis. This award will be used to establish an ICP-MS at Black Hills State University (BHSU) that will provide high sensitivity analysis capabilities for researchers in South Dakota and surrounding areas. The ICP-MS will be used by researchers in many disciplines including Physics, Chemistry, Geology, and Engineering. Undergraduate students will be involved in sample preparation, operation, instrument maintenance, and data analysis. This will expand BHSUs program of undergraduate research in the Black Hills region and throughout the state of South Dakota and increase the exposure of undergraduate students to state-of-the-art instrumentation. ICP-MS labs and training will be incorporated into Analytical Chemistry, Instrumental Analysis, Hydrogeology, Volcanology, Mineralogy and Petrology classes serving a combined estimated 90 students per year. BHSUs close proximity to six of the nine Indian reservations in South Dakota results in a large enrollment of American Indian students, many of whom will benefit from the acquisition of the ICP-MS.

With this ICP-MS, BHSU will be capable of screening the radio-purity of materials used in rare-event physics experiments at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The ICP-MS facility will also be used in support of SURF projects by characterizing the germanium crystals grown at the University of South Dakota and at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, and in the study of ancient metamorphosed basalts in and near SURF. Additional geological applications include petrogenesis studies of volcanic and metavolcanic rocks, paleoenvironmental analyses, research of biotic responses to past climate change and analyses of the incorporation and impact of trace metals and organic compounds derived from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coastal molluscan species in the Gulf of Mexico. Assessing the toxicity of nanomaterials for renewable energy generation, evaluating lanthanide dopant concentration in upconversion nanomaterials and the determination of complex ferrite compositions and impurities in attrition milled and surface functionalized metallic and intermetallic nanopowders are among the chemistry applications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: DISCOVERY RESEARCH K-12 | Award Amount: 2.97M | Year: 2011

Technology educators from Black Hills State University (SD) and Purdue University partner with science educators from the University of Massachusetts at Boston and Stevens Institute of Technology to determine the viability of an engineering concept-based approach to teacher professional development for secondary school science teachers in life science and in physical science. The project refines the conceptual base for engineering at the secondary level learning (previously developed by the PIs) to increase the understanding of engineering concepts by the science teachers. In a pilot test of two weeks of professional development with ten teachers from each discipline, teachers become familiar with engineering concepts and study the process of infusing engineering concepts into science curricula so that they can develop modules in their discipline to be taught during the following in the school year. The following summer the teachers debrief the process and develop additional modules for their discipline. The process is revised and repeated with 22 teachers from each discipline. Teachers are explicitly provided strategies to help them meet the needs of diverse learners. The outputs of this project include: 1) a preliminary framework for secondary level engineering education to be published in both research and practitioner journals; 2) a pilot tested and validated Engineering Concept Assessment; 3) engineering-infused curriculum modules in life and physical science; and 4) a professional development model to prepare science teachers to infuse engineering in their teaching.

The project compares student learning when particular concepts in physics and biology are taught through engineering design with learning the same concepts taught an earlier group of students with present reform techniques used in the discipline. The hypothesis is that when teachers and students engage with engineering design activities their understanding of science concepts and inquiry are also enhanced. The research component of the project employs an iterative design with the design of activities followed by development and implementation. An engineering concept assessment is developed and tested to examine teacher learning and to determine how engineering concepts can be infused into the science curricula for life and physical science. Other quantitative and qualitative instruments are developed to assess the teachers? understandings of the engineering concepts and their pedagogical implications.

There is increasing emphasis on integrative STEM education. New national and international assessments are developing engineering strands and emphasizing non-routine problem solving. The framework for the Next Generation Science Standards includes engineering as one of four strands. Stand alone engineering course are not likely to be widely used. This project develops engineering infused science units and determines the professional development needed to use them effectively.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STEM + Computing (STEM+C) Part | Award Amount: 563.53K | Year: 2014

Developing computer science teachers that can support high school students in being successful in rigorous, academic computer science courses is a national need, particularly in rural communities. The STEM-C (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, including Computing) Partnerships program supports research-driven partnerships between STEM experts and K-12 school systems to bring about institutional change for better STEM education at the K-12 level. Building on a prior partnership, this STEM-C Partnerships Computer Science Education Expansion project will permanently increase and enhance computer science learning opportunities for 9th and 10th grade students in the Rapid City, South Dakota, area. Over a three-year period, this Partnership will support twenty-four current teachers in offering the Exploring Computer Science (ECS) course. This Partnership is led by two core Partners, the Black Hills State University and the Rapid City Area Schools, which serve the most pre-service teachers and the most off-reservation Native American K-12 students in South Dakota, respectively. Additional Partners include most of the districts in the Rapid City region, the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Technology and Innovation in Education, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, a major scientific research lab in the region.

In addition to establishing the Exploring Computer Science Course at Rapid City Area Schools and neighboring school districts, this Partnership will build strong capacity within K-12 teachers to implement the course well. It will also build linkages among teacher training institutions, local science facilities, K-12 districts, and a regional science and technology university. The project will conduct teacher training activities both on-site and at workshops, and will provide a variety of outreach trainings designed to encourage teachers, administrators, and youth too young to take the ECS course to become excited about the possibilities within computer science. In addition, the project will contribute research findings to the field of computer science education about the teaching and learning of computer science at the high school level. The educational research agenda will address the extent to and ways in which participation in the ECS course influences students attitudes and beliefs about the nature of computer science, its importance, and its relevance to their lives; and their content knowledge of computer science and related problem-solving skills. Research will also explore the extent to and ways in which teacher participation in the EPCS Project increases teachers capacity to provide high-quality instruction. Together, the Partners build on the success of a prior Math and Science Partnership project focused on mathematics education, including ways of developing new instructional materials, the introduction and development of a team of instructional coaches, training opportunities for administrators, and family engagement. Research instruments will be developed to measure students attitudes and beliefs about the nature of computer science, its importance, and relevance to daily life. These instruments, plus the Horizon Classroom Observation Protocol, will be used to evaluate the impact of the computer science courses and associated outreach on teachers and learners in a mixed methods study.

Loading Black Hills State University collaborators
Loading Black Hills State University collaborators