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Randwick, Australia

Parker G.,University of New South Wales | Parker G.,Black Dog Institute Building | Anonuevo C.,Black Dog Institute | Wallace J.,Black Dog Institute | And 2 more authors.
Australasian Psychiatry | Year: 2013

Objective: To report on the wide uptake and utility of the freely available Mood Assessment Program (MAP) since its introduction as a tool to assist diagnosis and management of mood disorders. Method: By mid-2012, some 16,000 patients had completed the MAP. We analyse data derived from such a sample. Results: The majority of patients utilizing this service were referred by general practitioners, psychologists and psychiatrists from within New South Wales (NSW). The great majority across age bands found the MAP easy to complete and judged that it covers issues relating to their mood disorder very well or completely. Conclusion: The MAP is available for use Australia-wide with ready referral access for patients of mental health practitioners in general practice, psychiatry, psychology and social work. The online availability of the service makes it ideal for use in areas where access to health services is limited. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2013. Source


Paterson A.,University of New South Wales | Paterson A.,Black Dog Institute Building | Parker G.,University of New South Wales | Fletcher K.,University of New South Wales | Graham R.,University of New South Wales
Australasian Psychiatry | Year: 2013

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the views of women diagnosed with a mood disorder about children, medication and pregnancy. Method: Female patients from the Black Dog Institute were invited to complete a questionnaire regarding their views about pregnancy, children and medication during pregnancy. Diagnostic groupings were derived by assessing DSM-IV criteria for mood disorders. Unipolar and bipolar patient responses were analysed to determine any differences between groups. Results: Women with bipolar disorder were more concerned than those with a unipolar condition about the impact pregnancy would have on their mood, as well as the potential for their offspring to inherit a mood condition. Both groups of women expressed concerns regarding the child-rearing environment, and stated that knowing the risk their child could have of developing a mood disorder would encourage them to be more vigilant parents. Conclusion: While both groups were concerned about the environment in which they would raise their child and wanted to be vigilant parents, women diagnosed with a bipolar condition expressed stronger opinions regarding the impact that their pregnancy could have on their mood disorder, and passing the mood disorder onto their children. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2013. Source


Parker G.,University of New South Wales | Parker G.,Black Dog Institute Building | Paterson A.,University of New South Wales | McCraw S.,University of New South Wales | And 2 more authors.
Australasian Psychiatry | Year: 2013

Objective: To assess whether psychiatrists in the community operate to a sub-typing model of mood disorders when choosing psychotropic medications. Method: Patients assessed through the Black Dog Institute depression clinic provided information on their previously prescribed and current medications, on how effective they found them and whether they had to be ceased due to side-effects. The prevalence of each medication trialled was analysed according to diagnosis (bipolar I, bipolar II, unipolar melancholic depression or unipolar non-melancholic depression). Results: Analyses indicate that psychiatrists prescribe medications differentially in line with diagnosis. This effect was found in both previously prescribed and currently prescribed medications, and was most distinct for mood stabiliser and antipsychotic medications. Several medications, in contrast, appeared to have been trialled by the majority of patients, regardless of diagnosis. Analyses of effectiveness and cessation due to side-effects were compromised by small sub-sample sizes. Conclusions: Psychiatrists in the community appear to operate to a sub-typing model of mood disorders, preferentially prescribing many medications according to mood disorder sub-type. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Source

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