Bispebjerg University Hospital

Denmark

Bispebjerg University Hospital

Denmark
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Toft U.,Glostrup University Hospital | Cerqueira C.,Glostrup University Hospital | Andreasen A.H.,Glostrup University Hospital | Thuesen B.H.,Glostrup University Hospital | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology | Year: 2014

Background: A simple and valid alternative for 24-hour urine collection to estimate populational 24-hour urinary sodium excretion would be desirable for monitoring sodium intake in populations. Aim: To assess the validity of the predicted 24-hour urinary sodium excretion using spot urine and two different prediction methods in a Danish population.Methods: Overall, 473 Danish individuals provided a para-aminobenzoic acid-validated complete 24-hour urine collection and a spot urine sample. Data were collected in the DanThyr study (248 women aged 25-30 years and 60-65 years) and the Inter99 study (102 men and 113 women aged 30-60 years), respectively. The measured 24-hour urine sodium excretion was compared with the predicted 24-hour sodium excretion from a causal urine specimen, using both the Tanaka prediction method and a prediction model developed in a Danish population.Results: The measured 24-hour sodium excretion (median, 5th to 95th percentile) was men 195 (110 to 360) and women 139 (61 to 258), whereas the predicted 24-hour sodium excretion for the Tanaka model was men 171 (117 to 222) and women 153 (92 to 228) and for the Danish model was men 207 (146 to 258); women 134 (103 to 163). The Spearman correlation between predicted and measured 24-hour sodium excretion was 0.39 and 0.49 for the Tanaka and the Danish model, respectively. For both prediction models, the proportion of individuals classified in the same or adjacent quintile was 74% for men and 64% for women.Conclusions: Both prediction models gave a reasonable classification of individuals according to their sodium excretion. However, the median daily sodium intake was estimated more precisely by the Danish model, especially among men. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

ALK (ALKB:DC / OMX: ALK B / AKABY / AKBLF) today announced the appointment of Hendrik Nolte, M.D., Med.Sc.D, as Senior Vice President of Research and Development for North America and International Markets, based in the USA. Hendrik Nolte will be responsible for ALK's R&D strategy in North America and International markets including China, and will work in collaboration with ALK's partners for Russia, Japan, South-East Asia, Australia and New Zealand. Henrik Jacobi, ALK's Executive Vice President of Research and Development, said: "Hendrik's reputation in the allergy immunotherapy field is unsurpassed and we welcome him to ALK as a key figure in the scale-up of our North American operations and an important contributor to our work to globalise the SLIT-tablet portfolio." In his previous role as Head of Respiratory at Merck Sharp & Dome, Hendrik Nolte led the development and registration efforts for ALK's grass and ragweed SLIT-tablets - GRASTEK® and RAGWITEK® - as well as for the house dust mite SLIT-tablet. Hendrik Nolte commented: "I am honoured to have the opportunity to return to ALK. Throughout my career, as both a physician and a scientist, I have been impressed by ALK's commitment to cure allergies. Allergy research and respiratory medicine has been my life's work and I am continually motivated by both the unmet medical need of patients, particularly those with respiratory allergies, and by the growing scientific evidence in favour of treatment with allergy immunotherapy." Hendrik Nolte has held roles in clinical research at Roche, Hycor Biomedical and ALK. Before assuming leadership roles at Merck in 2005, Hendrik Nolte was an associate professor at the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Copenhagen, where he also served as a lung specialist and head of the respiratory ward at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Hendrik Nolte received his medical degree (M.D) from University of Copenhagen in 1985 and received his doctoral degree (Dr. Med) in 1992. ALK is a research-driven global pharmaceutical company focusing on allergy prevention, diagnosis and treatment. ALK is a world leader in allergy immunotherapy - a treatment of the underlying cause of allergy. The company has approximately 2,300 employees, with subsidiaries, production facilities and distributors worldwide. ALK has entered into partnership agreements with Torii, Abbott, and Seqirus to commercialise sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablets in Japan, Russia, and South-East Asia, and Australia and New Zealand, respectively. The company is headquartered in Hørsholm, Denmark, and listed on NASDAQ Copenhagen. Find more information at http://www.alk.net.


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

ALK (ALKB:DC / OMX: ALK B / AKABY / AKBLF) today announced the appointment of Hendrik Nolte, M.D., Med.Sc.D, as Senior Vice President of Research and Development for North America and International Markets, based in the USA. Hendrik Nolte will be responsible for ALK’s R&D strategy in North America and International markets including China, and will work in collaboration with ALK’s partners for Russia, Japan, South-East Asia, Australia and New Zealand. Henrik Jacobi, ALK’s Executive Vice President of Research and Development, said: “Hendrik’s reputation in the allergy immunotherapy field is unsurpassed and we welcome him to ALK as a key figure in the scale-up of our North American operations and an important contributor to our work to globalise the SLIT-tablet portfolio.” In his previous role as Head of Respiratory at Merck Sharp & Dome, Hendrik Nolte led the development and registration efforts for ALK’s grass and ragweed SLIT-tablets – GRASTEK® and RAGWITEK® – as well as for the house dust mite SLIT-tablet. Hendrik Nolte commented: "I am honoured to have the opportunity to return to ALK. Throughout my career, as both a physician and a scientist, I have been impressed by ALK’s commitment to cure allergies. Allergy research and respiratory medicine has been my life’s work and I am continually motivated by both the unmet medical need of patients, particularly those with respiratory allergies, and by the growing scientific evidence in favour of treatment with allergy immunotherapy." Hendrik Nolte has held roles in clinical research at Roche, Hycor Biomedical and ALK. Before assuming leadership roles at Merck in 2005, Hendrik Nolte was an associate professor at the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Copenhagen, where he also served as a lung specialist and head of the respiratory ward at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Hendrik Nolte received his medical degree (M.D) from University of Copenhagen in 1985 and received his doctoral degree (Dr. Med) in 1992.  For further information please contact: Investor Relations: Per Plotnikof, tel. +45 4574 7527, mobile +45 2261 2525 Media: Jeppe Ilkjær, tel. +45 7877 4532, mobile +45 3050 2014 About ALK ALK is a research-driven global pharmaceutical company focusing on allergy prevention, diagnosis and treatment. ALK is a world leader in allergy immunotherapy – a treatment of the underlying cause of allergy. The company has approximately 2,300 employees, with subsidiaries, production facilities and distributors worldwide. ALK has entered into partnership agreements with Torii, Abbott, and Seqirus to commercialise sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablets in Japan, Russia, and South-East Asia, and Australia and New Zealand, respectively. The company is headquartered in Hørsholm, Denmark, and listed on NASDAQ Copenhagen. Find more information at www.alk.net.


Jensen D.H.,Copenhagen University | Aaboe K.,Herlev University Hospital | Henriksen J.E.,University of Southern Denmark | Volund A.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Diabetologia | Year: 2012

Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to evaluate the separate impact of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) on the incretin effect. Methods Twenty-one healthy glucose-tolerant first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a 75 g OGTT, an isoglycaemic i.v. glucose test and a mixed meal to evaluate the incretin effect before and after treatment with dexamethasone to increase insulin resistance. Beta cell glucose sensitivity, beta cell index and fasting proinsulin were measured as indices of beta cell function. Results After dexamethasone, ten individuals had increased insulin resistance but normal glucose tolerance (NGT), while 11 individuals with an equal increase in insulin resistance developed IGT. In the NGT and IGT groups, the incretin effects were 71±3.2% and 67±4.6% (p00.4) before reatment, but decreased significantly in both groups to 58±5.2% and 32±8.8% (p<0.05 between groups) after treatment. Dexamethasone increased total glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide responses to the OGTT. The impaired incretin effect in NGT was observed in the absence of reductions in beta cell glucose sensitivity and beta cell index during i.v. glucose, corrected for insulin resistance, but in parallel with increased proinsulin/C-peptide ratio. Conclusion/interpretation Insulin resistance and IGT, representing two stages in the path towards diabetes, are associated with differential reductions in the incretin effect seen before the development of IGT and overt type 2 diabetes. The reduction is unrelated to secretion of incretin hormones, but is related to insulin resistance and subtle beta cell defects, and is further aggravated on development of IGT. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Fabricius S.,University of Southern Denmark | Lerche C.M.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | Philipsen P.A.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | Wulf H.C.,Bispebjerg University Hospital
Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences | Year: 2013

Inflammation and pain are well known adverse-effects in photodynamic therapy (PDT). There is currently a tendency towards introducing lower concentrations of the photosensitizer than used in the standard treatment for various indications. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced concentrations of methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) can reduce inflammation (erythema) during PDT treatment. We measured the formation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) using fluorescence and monitored both erythema and pain during and after PDT treatment with conventional 16% MAL and threee reduced concentrations of 2, 0.75, and 0.25% in twenty-four healthy volunteers. We found that lowering the MAL concentration reduced PpIX fluorescence and erythema after PDT treatment. There was a strong correlation (R2 = 0.70) between the PpIX fluorescence and erythema after treatment. A further increase in erythema after PDT was dependent on pre-treatment skin erythema. PpIX fluorescence could explain 70% of the increase in erythema (P < 0.0005). Pain and post-treatment hyperpigmentation can be reduced but not eliminated by limiting the MAL concentration. An efficacy study of PDT with these three reduced concentrations has not been performed. This journal is © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies.


Bang C.L.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | Porsbjerg C.M.,Bispebjerg University Hospital
Respiratory Medicine Case Reports | Year: 2016

Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). We present a case of acute chest pain in a 58-year-old male with severe asthma, which regressed after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine. At the time of hospital admission, there were non-specific ST-changes on the ecg, coronary enzymes were increased, and the patient was concluded to have a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and treated as such. A subacute cardiac catheterization showed no signs of significant coronary stenosis. During the next days, there was increasing pain and reduced strength in both feet. Paraclinical imaging and neurological examinations could not explain the symptoms, and physiotherapy was initiated. At the time, no connection to patient's diagnosis of severe asthma was made. The patient was seen in the respiratory outpatient clinic for a routine check-up, three weeks after the initial hospital admission. At this point, there was increasing pain in both legs and the patient had difficulty walking and experienced increasing dyspnea. Blood eosinophils were elevated (12.7 × 109/L), and an acute HRCT scan showed bilateral peribronchial infiltrates with ground glass opacification and small noduli. A diagnosis of EGPA was established, and administration of systemic glucocorticoids was initiated. A year and a half later, there is still reduced strength and sensory loss. This case illustrates that it is important to consider alternative diagnoses in patients with atypical symptoms and a low risk profile. Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome), which makes a quick diagnosis and prompt initiation of correct treatment imperative. © 2016 The Author(s)


Krogh J.,Copenhagen University | Krogh J.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | Nordentoft M.,Copenhagen University | Sterne J.A.C.,University of Bristol | Lawlor D.A.,University of Bristol
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry | Year: 2011

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of exercise in adults with clinical depression. Data Sources: The databases CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, and PsycINF Owere searched (1806-2008) using medical subject headings (MeSH) and text word terms depression, depressive disorder and exercise, aerobic, non-aerobic, physical activity, physical fitness, walk*, jog*, run*, bicycling, swim*, strength, and resistance. Study Selection: Randomized trials including adults with clinical depression according to any diagnostic system were included. Data Extraction: Two investigators evaluated trials using a prepiloted structured form. Data Synthesis: Thirteen trials were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Eight had adequate allocation concealment, 6 had a blinded outcome, and 5 used intention-to-treat analyses. The pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) calculated using a random-effects model was -0.40 (95% CI, -0.66 to -0.14), with evidence of heterogeneity between trials (I2 = 57.2%, P = .005). There was an inverse association between duration of intervention and the magnitude of the association of exercise with depression (P = .002). No other characteristics were related to between-study heterogeneity. Pooled analysis of 5 trials with long-term follow-up (ie, that examined outcomes beyond the end of the intervention) suggested no long-term benefit (SMD, -0.01; 95% CI, -0.28 to 0.26), with no strong evidence of heterogeneity in this pooled analysis (I2 = 23.4%, P = .27). There was no strong statistical evidence for small study bias (P > .27). Only 3 studies were assessed as high quality (adequately concealed random allocation, blinded outcome assessment, and intention-to-treat analysis). When we pooled results from these, the estimated beneficial effect of exercise was more modest (SMD, -0.19; 95% CI, -0.70 to 0.31) than the pooled result for all 13 studies, with no strong evidence of benefit. Conclusions: Our results suggest a short-term effect of exercise on depression: on average, depression scores 0.4 of a standard deviation lower in clinically depressed patients randomly assigned to an exercise intervention at the end of that intervention compared to those randomly assigned to a none exercise group. There is little evidence of a long-term beneficial effect of exercise in patients with clinical depression. © Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.


Holtermann A.,Helmholtz Center Munich | Mortensen O.S.,Helmholtz Center Munich | Mortensen O.S.,Bispebjerg University Hospital | Burr H.,Helmholtz Center Munich | And 3 more authors.
Heart | Year: 2010

Background: No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. Methods: The study comprised 30-year follow-up of a cohort of 5249 gainfully employed men aged 40e59 years in the Copenhagen Male Study. 274 men with cardiovascular disease were excluded from the follow-up. Physical fitness (maximal oxygen consumption, Vo2max) was estimated using the Åstrand bicycle ergometer test, and number of work hours was obtained from questionnaire items; 4943 men were eligible for the incidence study. Results: 587 men (11.9%) died because of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Cox analyses adjusted for age, blood pressure, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, physical work demands, and social class, showed that working more than 45 h/week was associated with an increased risk of IHD mortality in the least fit (Vo 2max range 15-26; HR 2.28, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.73), but not intermediate (Vo2max range 27-38; HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.51) and most fit men (Vo2max range 39-78; HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.41 to 2.02) referencing men working less than 40 h/week. Conclusions: The findings indicate that men with low physical fitness are at increased risk for IHD mortality from working long hours. Men working long hours should be physically fit.


Vammen M.A.,Bispebjerg University Hospital
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2016

OBJECTIVE:: This study is a 2-year follow-up study of different dimensions of work-related emotional demands as a predictor for clinical depression. METHODS:: In a two-wave study, 3224 (72%) public employees from 474 work-units participated twice by filling in questionnaires. Sixty-two cases of clinical depression were diagnosed. Emotional demands were examined as perceived and content-related emotional demands, individually reported and work-unit based. Support, meaningful work, and enrichment were considered as potential effect modifiers. RESULTS:: Individually reported perceived emotional demands predicted depression (odds ratio: 1.40; 95% confidence intervals: 1.02 to 1.92). The work-unit based odds ratio was in the same direction, though not significant. Content-related emotional demands did not predict depression. Support, meaningful work, and enrichment did not modify the results. CONCLUSIONS:: The personal perception of emotional demands was a risk factor for clinical depression but specific emotionally demanding work tasks were not. Copyright © 2016 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine


Mouridsen S.E.,Bispebjerg University Hospital
Autism : the international journal of research and practice | Year: 2013

The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International classification of mental and behavioural disorders, 10th edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism/pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified with 258 controls from the general population. All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register. The average observation time was 32.9 years, and mean age at the end of the observation period was 48.5 years. Among the 89 cases with atypical autism, a total of 22 (24.7%) were registered with at least one diagnosis of any disease of the gastrointestinal tract, against 47 of 258 (18.2%) in the comparison group (p = 0.22; odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.6). Without reaching statistical significance, the rate of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract was particularly high (odds ratio = 1.2) in those with intelligence quotient < 70. Overall, people with atypical autism had about the same frequency of gastric, intestinal and hepatic diseases as had controls.

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