Birmingham, United Kingdom
Birmingham, United Kingdom

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Ibrahim M.S.,Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham | Khan M.A.,University of Sussex | Rostom M.,Addenbrookes Hospital Cambridge | Platt A.,Castle Hill Hospital Cottingham
Surgical technology international | Year: 2014

This study aimed to investigate rupture rates following primary flexor tendon repair and to identify potential risk factors of rupture. Fifty-one patients with 100 flexor tendon injuries who underwent primary repair over a one-year period were reviewed. We collected demographic and surgical data. Causes of rupture were examined. Ruptured primary tendon repairs were compared with those that did not rupture. Univariate and multivariate analysis were undertaken to identify significant risk factors. Eleven percent of repaired tendons ruptured with a higher rupture rate noted in the non-dominant hand (p value = 0.009), in Zone II (0.001), and when more than 72 hours surgical delay occurred (0.01). Multivariate regression analysis identified repair in Zone II injuries to be the most significant predictor. Our rate of rupture of 11% was associated with delay in surgery, repair on non-dominant hand, and Zone II repairs. Careful consideration of these factors is crucial to reduce this rate.


PubMed | Addenbrookes Hospital Cambridge, Castle Hill Hospital Cottingham, University of Sussex and Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham
Type: | Journal: Surgical technology international | Year: 2014

This study aimed to investigate rupture rates following primary flexor tendon repair and to identify potential risk factors of rupture. Fifty-one patients with 100 flexor tendon injuries who underwent primary repair over a one-year period were reviewed. We collected demographic and surgical data. Causes of rupture were examined. Ruptured primary tendon repairs were compared with those that did not rupture. Univariate and multivariate analysis were undertaken to identify significant risk factors. Eleven percent of repaired tendons ruptured with a higher rupture rate noted in the non-dominant hand (p value = 0.009), in Zone II (0.001), and when more than 72 hours surgical delay occurred (0.01). Multivariate regression analysis identified repair in Zone II injuries to be the most significant predictor. Our rate of rupture of 11% was associated with delay in surgery, repair on non-dominant hand, and Zone II repairs. Careful consideration of these factors is crucial to reduce this rate.


PubMed | Royal Center for Defence Medicine, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham and British Army Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps | Year: 2016

Multiplex PCR can provide rapid diagnosis for patients presenting with an acute undifferentiated febrile illness. Such technology is useful in deployed settings, where access to conventional microbiological diagnosis is limited. It was used in Sierra Leone to guide management of febrile healthcare workers, in whom Ebola virus disease was a possible cause. In particular, it informed appropriate antibiotic treatment while minimising the risk to clinicians of exposure to the causative organism.

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