West Midlands, United Kingdom

Birmingham City University

www.bcu.ac.uk
West Midlands, United Kingdom

Birmingham City University is a newly established British university in the city of Birmingham, England. It is the second largest of five universities in the city, the other four being Aston University, University of Birmingham, University College Birmingham, and Newman University. It is the third most highly ranked of the five universities in Birmingham according to the Complete University Guide, below both the University of Birmingham and Aston University. Initially established as the Birmingham College of Art with roots dating back to 1843, it was designated as a polytechnic in 1971 and gained university status in 1992.The university has three main campuses serving four faculties, and offers courses in art and design, business, the built environment, computing, education, engineering, English, healthcare, law, the performing arts, social science, and technology. A £125million extension to its campus in the city centre of Birmingham, part of the Eastside development of a new technology and learning quarter, is opening in two stages, with the first phase having opened its doors in 2013. The university is a member of the million+ group of New Universities.Roughly half of the university's full-time students are from the West Midlands, and a large percentage of these are from ethnic minorities. The university runs access and foundation programmes through an international network of associated universities and further education colleges, and has the highest intake of foreign students in the Birmingham area. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 157.31K | Year: 2015

CHIME is a transnational research project that explores how changing relationships between music, festivals and cultural heritage sites renegotiate established understandings and uses of heritage. Led by a highly experienced cross-disciplinary team of transnational researchers, this innovative project explores the uses and re-uses of different types of heritage through the lens of jazz and improvised music festivals. We will combine an ambitious research programme with strong, carefully targeted collaborative partnerships in order to advance understandings of cultural heritage among different communities of interest. Our core focus on festivals reflects the important - if undervalued - position that festivals occupy in Europes cultural ecology, with their dynamic and synergetic relationship to spaces and cultural sites. We will use jazz and improvised music as a lens through which to explore key issues in heritage research, drawing on the musics unique and complex relationship to concepts of high and low culture, tradition, innovation, authenticity and (non)-European identity. CHIME integrates traditional scholarly outputs with Knowledge Exchange (KE) activities, and we will work collaboratively with 10 Associated Partners (APs) over a 28-month period to develop a series of Research and Development tools that will be of benefit to festivals, the jazz and improvised music sectors, policy makers and the broader cultural and creative industries. Our Associated Partners are festivals and music promoters, museums and archives, cultural policy makers and national and international networking organisations. CHIME focuses on three thematic work packages (WPs): Improvising Heritage: jazz, festivals and heritage sites; Marketising Heritage: jazz in urban spaces; and Sounding Heritage: jazz festival landscapes in the Netherlands. Each work package will develop a programme of activities that feeds into the following research questions: ?How does jazz music facilitate aonnection to heritage and enable a reconfiguring of peoples relationship to place? ?In what ways do jazz and improvised music festivals provide new models for engagement with cultural heritage? ?How does music shape and inform understandings of cultural memory through uses and re-uses of heritage? ?What synergies and frictions are created when festivals and heritage sites interact (from positive re-imaginings of the past to envisaging alternative futures, from the negotiation of problems between conservation and use, to frictions between tourism and local interests etc.)? ?In what ways can jazz and improvised music festivals act as lens to interrogate concepts of cultural identity? ?How do music festivals blur the boundaries between tangible, intangible and digital heritage?


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 82.65K | Year: 2016

The project explores our understanding of global conflict as it relates to the European refugee crisis, which has been framed simultaneously as a humanitarian emergency and a security threat. We are examining how this understanding is constructed through media representations, official and popular discourses, and institutional and citizen-led initiatives. In doing so, we wish to explore how people understand both population movement and the role of local, national and European institutions in relation to conflict. We are exploring how this understanding in turn shapes institutional and popular responses in receiving countries, ranging from hostility, such as the framing of refugees by politicians, as economic migrants who are abusing the asylum system; to solidarity, as in grassroots citizen initiatives, using social media to host refuges and send donations to Calais. We are also interested in examining how experiences and perceptions of conflict are remembered and memorialised by displaced people and the role this can play in peace-building and conflict resolution. We are focusing on the UK and Italy as two countries that have experienced mistrust towards European institutions (intertwined with debates around migration in relation to conflict), connected to disaffection with mainstream politics, but where, despite this, there are simultaneously numerous local citizens initiatives in solidarity with refugees, often organized through social media. Our project will explore this situation through an interdisciplinary approach in which we apply arts methodologies to social issues. This includes mapping official and media discourses used to construct the refugee crisis in the UK and Italy; mapping citizen initiatives both in solidarity with refugees and those which express hostility towards them; conducting interviews in collaboration with organisations supporting migrants asylum seekers in the UK and Italy; a study of social media responses to the refugee crisis, and a survey of attitudes to the refugee crisis and the role of political institutions. We will also carry out critical memory work workshops for people who have fled conflict. Critical memory work is a method which uses performance and other creative approaches for people to reflect on their experiences and to explore how conflict is remembered and memorialised. The material gathered from this research will be disseminated to several audiences. We develop publications for academic audiences (a book and several journal articles) and will present our work at conferences. We will also create a report summarising findings for organisations and policymakers. Working with Implicated Theatre (a theatre company with experience in community theatre and participatory arts), we will develop an ethnodrama script. Ethnodrama is a method for incorporating social sciences research findings (quotes, survey data, ethnographic fieldnotes) etc. into a theatrical script and/or performance. The script will be shared with community organisations. The report and ethnodrama script will be translated into Italian to share the results of our research to Italian audiences. At the end of the project, we will hold a public event at Nottingham Contemporary in which we share research findings, and hold a public reading of the ethnodrama script. A smaller-scale parallel event will be held in Italy at an alternative theatre, working in collaboration with Cantieri Meticci, a theatre company with experience working with asylum seekers. The material will also be used to develop an online archive which will be hosted by the University of East London as part of their Social Sciences Living Refugee Archive.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 81.60K | Year: 2015

To develop and implement new innovative optimal transit package design service


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 113.72K | Year: 2016

To research, design and implement a high-level, Software Defined Networking based application for the faster, centralised management of low-level network infrastructure configuration and security compliance.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 36.34K | Year: 2016

There is a crisis in British higher education, in terms of the lack of representation of Black (African and African Caribbean) scholars and knowledges. Only 1.1% of British born academics are Black and the academy has largely marginalised the experiences and contributions of Black communities. This gap in academic knowledge is important because it means that society has not fully accounted for the impacts of its diversity. The marginalisation of Black experiences has consequences not just for the equality agenda but, more importantly, for knowledge production. If a significant section on the population is locked out of academia then the knowledge produced is itself exclusionary. It is no surprise, then, that the policy agenda and discourse is so discriminatory when the knowledge upon which it is based is so exclusionary. The Blackness in Britain: Beyond the Black Atlantic research network will seek to redress this marginalisation by bringing together an interdisciplinary range of academics, activists and artists who will engage in conferences, workshops and symposiums exploring Black life in Britain, and making links across the African Diaspora. A specific aim for of the network will be to explore aspects of the history of Black populations in the UK and also the contribution of the Black Arts movement to both activism and knowledge. We also intend to explore beyond the concept of the Black Atlantic, which has focused discussion on English speaking African Diasporas. The aim of the network is to produce fully establish a Black Studies professional association and peer reviewed journal, which can continue to develop work in the area of Black Studies after the completion of the project. The topics covered during the two year project will include: October 2016: Symposium: Black Studies and British Higher Education. This first symposium will begin framing the interdisciplinary area of discipline of Black Studies and developments moving forward. March 2017: Symposium: The Black Mediterranean and the Migrant Crisis. In this session will try to connect Black Studies in Britain to the migrant crisis, by using the concept of the Black Mediterranean in conversation with scholars and activists. June 2017: Conference: Connecting Blackness in Britain to Latin America. A key focus of the research network is to connect Black experiences in Britain with parts of the African Diaspora with weaker connections to British scholarship. Latin America is a particular area of focus for this reason, especially because it has the largest African Diaspora. November 2017: Symposium: Black Arts Movement. Black artists and writers have played a key role in Black communities in Britain, connecting to activism and filling the gap created by academic marginalisation. Making connections to Black artists and academic are essential for Black Studies. March 2018: Reconnecting to the Francophone Caribbean. The work of scholars such as Franz Fanon and Aime Cesaire has been influential on Black Studies in Britain. We therefore aim to rebuild connections to the Francophone Caribbean. June 2018: Book writing workshop: The Challenge for Black Studies. This workshop will produce the framework for a book that explores the themes of the series by bringing together key participants from the network. The aim is for the journal that will be established during the project to publish special issues on the first 3 events. The journal will be academically rigorous but also written in non-technical language and fully open access to gain the widest possible readership. The final event will be a workshop that brings together contributors for a book The Challenge for Black Studies, which will be published as part of the Blackness in Britain book series edited by the principal investigator. We also intend that by bringing scholars together through the series a number of research collaborations will be fostered through the network.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 81.60K | Year: 2015

To establish an innovative manufacturing process management capability.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 97.41K | Year: 2015

To develop and establish a digitally centred/focused replication and repair facility that enables the company to provide a holistic, cost effective claims handling and insured replacement service to their claimants.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 369.27K | Year: 2016

This project will explore the music French publisher Durands major edition in its centenary year to deliver scholarly and educational outputs, whose outcomes have the potential to change practice in French music research. The Édition classique is a significant, large, but little explored, collection of European piano music from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, supported by editorial prefaces, published by Durand in Paris from 1915 onwards. Its repertoire comprises music by well-known and since-forgotten composers, which was edited by well- and lesser-known early twentieth-century French composers, together with musicologists and teachers at the Paris Conservatoire. Other fin-de-siècle editions (for example, Henry Experts edition, or Saint-Saënss Oeuvres complètes de Rameau) have been the subject of thriving research, but the contribution of the Édition classique to this forum is not yet known. This timely project (with most music now in the public domain) will investigate the edition in its first fruitful decade (c. 1915-25), as a prism through which to reinterpret the musical past. Three temporal positions are implied: the editions World War I setting; the earlier period(s) of the original music; our present day. Enquiries will focus on the French accent given to these Classics, involving interplay between musical subject and object; attitudes relating to time and place; French heritage and internationalism. Investigation will start with detailed analytical case studies of edited music, which will uphold the highest levels of collaborative scholarship. These are selected on the basis of: a balance of musics; well- and lesser-known composers/editors; source availability; use of volumes with editorial commentary; comparative editions; and analytical interest. The initial group will include Ravel (editing Mendelssohn) and Debussy (Chopin); Emmanuel, Garban and Roger-Ducasse (Bach and Burgundian folksongs); balanced by music of the eighteenth-cy French harpsichordists, including Couperin (edited by Tiersot) and Rameau (Diémer). A second group will likely include: Closson (editing Les Classiques belges), Ropartz (Handel), Riéra (Liszt) and Roussel (Mendelssohns chamber music). Access to sources will be secured via the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Durand and Paris Conservatoire archives, online resources and private collections. Secondly, using blended archival, historical and interpretative skills, assessment of the role and wider cultural network of the Édition classique will offer new insights into early twentieth-century French cultural identity (e.g. incipient neoclassicism); relations with twentieth-century French composers own music; canonic issues; Conservatoire pedagogy; wartime publishing, in the context of editions by Expert, Saint-Saëns and Heugel. The project will also embrace how todays users - students, scholars, musicians and the wider public - can benefit from (test out and inflect) this knowledge, including alternative interpretations for pianists and the promotion of lost repertoire. The main outputs will comprise: a catalogue of the Édition classiques contents (c. 1915-25; approx. 120 edited volumes, 18 editors, 22 earlier composers); three case study articles/chapters, some co-authored (about Ravel and Roussel on Mendelssohn; Debussys Chopin edition and his own Études and sonatas; Francophone harpsichord music); three further articles (on revisionist implications of the editions canon; Conservatoire pedagogy; cultural-economic issues of wartime publishing); associated conference papers; performance workshop(s); a hosted international conference and public concert, with follow-on co-edited volume (which may house some chapters above); and a BBC Radio 3 programme. Pilot tests suggest that the French accent can vary from a subtle re-inflection - often relating to phrasing and accentuation - through to a much more fundamental re-writing of musical history.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 34.42K | Year: 2016

Aesthetic relations and qualities inform our experience of the world in powerful ways, and they exert this influence through their presence in our daily activities, from working with others to our most intimate exchanges with family and friends. While issues of everyday aesthetic value have been widely discussed within popular music studies (Clark et al, 2010; Frith, 1996, 2004; DeNora, 2000; Hesmondalgh, 2013), jazz scholars have largely avoided a direct engagement with this theoretical literature. This network is an attempt to explore through an innovative series of participatory workshops the role of the aesthetic experience of jazz is on peoples everyday lives. Meetings will focus on the transmission and reception of jazz in everyday contexts and examine the ways in which individuals and groups evaluate the musics artistic meaning and significance. Instances in which the experience of jazz is either lost or missed will also inform workshop exercises, and focus participants attention on understanding what is most ordinary about their relationship to music (Cavell, 2005). We believe that the study of the everyday aesthetic value of jazz informs not only our understanding of cultural practices; but it also provides a lens through which peoples everyday experiences can be examined more broadly. The overall aim of the network is to develop a better understanding of the cultural value of jazz for its audiences and to connect its value to the both the individual and collective dimensions of aesthetic experience and everyday life (de Certeau, 1998; Danto, 1981; Goffman, 1967; Highmore, 2002, 2011; Heller, 1984; Lefebvre, 2000; Light, & Smith, 2005; Sheringham, 2006; Stewart, 2007). This will be accomplished primarily through a series of networking events involving academics, particularly those with interests in reception theory in media and cultural studies, history, psychology, philosophy, and musicology, along with musicians, promoters, music journalists, and the wider public. International keynote speakers will be invited to address each event and the attendance of new researchers and research students will be encouraged through bursaries and other forms of financial support. Network events will be held in London, Edinburgh and Cheltenham, and Amsterdam and each will include a public performance by emerging jazz artists that engage with the workshop themes. We will seek to establish an audience focus group at the Cheltenham event. In addition to the events, the network website will provide an interactive space for participants to experiment with aesthetic experiences of jazz and respond to project performances. The intention of the network is to build relationships which open new paths of inquiry and will lead to further collaborations within and beyond jazz studies, especially between academics working in different disciplines, and between academics and jazz practitioners, jazz promoters and producers, and audiences outside the academic community. We are aiming to create a network which will be equally beneficial to all these groups, particularly to provide opportunities for the public dissemination of academic research. The network will provide a platform through which each of these groups can explore their relationship to jazz and contribute to the groups discussions. The network will encourage research that can be put to practical use, for example working in collaboration with venues, jazz festivals, and promoters, to inform their understanding of the musics significance to their audiences and to institute appropriate changes in policy where the research indicates this appropriate.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 121.29K | Year: 2015

To research, design and implement a secure and integrated networking service for high security applications.

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