Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg

Hamburg, Germany

Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg

Hamburg, Germany

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Gleadall I.G.,PO Box 598 | Guerrero-Kommritz J.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | Hochberg Jr. F.G.,Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History
Zoological Science | Year: 2010

Three inkless octopodids are described from the continental shelf off southeastern South America. These octopuses are a non-commercial by-catch in the Falkland Islands fishery. Muusoctopus eureka (Robson, 1929) is one of two common inkless octopuses and is of medium size, with orange-pink skin and a distinctive pattern of irregular dark markings, interspersed with white spots visible only in living or freshly dead specimens. The second common inkless octopus is M. longibrachus akambei, a new subspecies of the Chilean species Muusoctopus longibrachus (Ibez, Seplveda and Chong, 2006). It has slender arms and is much larger at full maturity than M. eureka. It is a plain orange color when alive, pinkish cream when preserved. Muusoctopus bizikovi, sp. nov., is a smaller, rarer species, colored wine-red whether alive or preserved, and has a vestigial ink duct between the digestive gland and the anus. Relations with other species are discussed. This group of octopuses has often been associated with the genus Benthoctopus Grimpe, 1921, which is a junior synonym of Bathypolypus Grimpe (a genus of small species characterized by much shorter arms and males with a robust copulatory organ bearing transverse lamellae). It is argued that the misleading characterization of the so-called Benthoctopus group of species as "smooth skinned" is based upon the artefactual appearance of specimens fixed and preserved suboptimally following a detrimental freeze-thaw cycle of fisheries material previously frozen while at sea. © 2010 Zoological Society of Japan.


Griep S.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | Schilling N.,Institute For Spezielle Zoologie Und Evolutionsbiologie | Marshall P.,UKE Athleticum | Amling M.,Institute For Osteologie Und Biomechanik | And 2 more authors.
Zoomorphology | Year: 2013

Compared to anurans from other families, landings of toads (Bufonidae) during saltation appear well coordinated and the initial landing impact is absorbed exclusively by the forelimbs. Although the forelimbs and particularly the pectoral girdle have been suggested to be important for shock absorption, the functional roles of its various elements have not been evaluated in detail. This study addresses open questions regarding the kinematics of the forelimbs during landing in Rhinella marina using X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology and scientific rotoscoping. The kinematic analysis clearly showed that in addition to motions in the shoulder and elbow joints, substantial movements of the pectoral girdle in toto as well as of its elements relative to each other do occur during landing. The pectoral girdle showed first and foremost rotations about its latero-lateral axis as well as dorso-ventral translations relative to the spine. Our results quantify the extent of flexion and extension in the suprascapula-scapular synchondrosis during landing. Forelimb kinematics in R. marina differed from that of other anurans in starting elbow extension relatively early during the landing process, which likely prevents the chest from contacting the ground. Furthermore, the animal regains an upright and ready-to-hop-again position quickly and the recovery phase is short compared to other anurans. Humeral kinematics and anatomy confirm that the glenohumeral interlocking mechanism guides the humerus during the initial landing phase. Cranio-ventral ridges on the humeral head and the paraglenoid cartilage interlock in anteverted and slightly retroverted humeral positions. This occurs at the beginning of the landing. When interlocked, adduction/abduction as well as long-axis rotation of the humerus are restricted. During the course of landing, the humerus retroverts and is gradually freed from interlocking restrictions due to a smoother relief at the caudal aspect of the humeral head. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Min P.Y.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Das I.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Check List | Year: 2013

We comment on the termination of the species nomen of Limnonectes rhacodus (originally described as Rana rhacoda) and report the species from two separate localities in Sarawak State, East Malaysia, based on individuals collected from Kubah National Park, Matang Range and Gunung Penrissen, Padawan, both in western Borneo. The species was previously known from central, western, and southern Kalimantan, Indonesia. These records are the first for Malaysia and extend the distribution range ca. 220 and 264 km northwest of the nearest locality of Bukit Baka-Bukit Raya National Park (West Kalimatan) and increase the species' elevational range from 500 m to 1,120 m asl. © 2013 Check List and Authors.


Hertwig S.T.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Min P.Y.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | Das I.,University Malaysia Sarawak
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

A new species of stream toad of the genus Ansonia is described from Gunung Murud, Pulong Tau National Park, of north-ern Sarawak, Malaysia, Borneo. Ansonia vidua, sp. nov., is morphologically distinguished from its Bornean congeners by the following combination of characters: medium size (SVL of adult females 33.5-34.4 mm); body uniformly black-brown in life; absence of a visible pattern on dorsum or limbs; presence of two low interorbital ridges; shagreened skin on dorsum, sides and upper surfaces of the limbs with numerous homogeneously small, rounded warts; first finger shorter than second; reduced webbing between the toes and an absence of a sharp tarsal ridge. Uncorrected genetic distances be-tween related taxa of > 4.3% in 16S rRNA gene support its status as a hitherto undescribed species. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.


Hertwig S.T.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Schweizer M.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Das I.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2013

The tree-frog family Rhacophoridae is a major group contributing to the high pecies richness and reproductive diversity among vertebrates of Sundaland. Nonetheless, rhacophorid evolution, specially on Borneo, has not been studied within a phylogenetic context. In this study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of 38 (out of 41) Bornean species of Rhacophoridae, in combination with data from previous phylogenetic studies. In the final super matrix of 91 species, we analyse sequence data from two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. The resulting trees show the genus Rhacophorus as a paraphyletic assemblage. As a consequence, we transfer Rhacophorus appendiculatus and R. kajau to two other genera and propose the new phylogeny-based combinations- Kurixalus appendiculatus and Feihyla kajau, respectively. Furthermore, we use our phylogenetic hypotheses to reconstruct the evolution of reproductive modes in rhacophorid tree frogs. Direct development to the exclusion of a free larval stage evolved twice independently, once in an ancestor of the Pseudophilautus+. Raorchestes clade in India and Sri Lanka, and once within Philautus in Southeast Asia. The deposition of egg clutches covered by a layer of jelly in Feihyla is also present in F. kajau and thus confirms our generic reassignment. The remarkably high diversity of rhacophorid tree frogs on Borneo is the outcome of a complex pattern of repeated vicariance and dispersal events caused by past changes in the climatic and geological history of the Sunda shelf. We identified geographic clades of closely related endemic species within Rhacophorus and Philautus, which result from local island radiations on Borneo. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Das I.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Min P.Y.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Hsu W.W.,Columbia University | Hertwig S.T.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

A new brightly-coloured (olive and red) species of microhylid frog of the genus Calluella Stoliczka 1872 is described from the upper elevations of Gunung Penrissen and the Matang Range, Sarawak, East Malaysia (Borneo). Calluella capsa, new species, is diagnosable in showing the following combination of characters: SVL up to 36.0 mm; dorsum weakly granular; a faint dermal fold across forehead; toe tips obtuse; webbing on toes basal; lateral fringes on toes present; outer metatarsal tubercle present; and dorsum greyish-olive, with red spots; half of venter bright red, the rest with large white and dark areas. The new species is the eighth species of Calluella to be described, and the fourth known from Borneo. A preliminary phylogeny of Calluella and its relatives is presented, and the new taxon compared with congeners from Malaysia and other parts of south-east Asia. © 2014 Magnolia Press.


Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | Pohlmeyer J.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | McLeod D.S.,University of Kansas | Kleinteich T.,University of Kiel | And 3 more authors.
Zoomorphology | Year: 2014

Tadpoles of Occidozyga species have been reported to be carnivorous, feeding on insects and other tadpoles. We present photographic evidence for the previously undocumented larval feeding behavior in O. baluensis. Furthermore, we present a detailed anatomical description of the skull, cranial musculature, and gross gut morphology based on three-dimensional reconstructions from serial sections and μCT imagery. The cranial anatomy of larval O. baluensis is highly derived in many characters, with respect to taxa outside the genus Occidozyga, most notably the palatoquadrate and hyobranchial apparatus, that play a major role in tadpole feeding. A large larval stomach was present in the specimens examined, indicative of a macrophagous carnivorous mode of feeding. Because of the relatively small oral orifice, relatively large-sized food items found in the larval stomach, and the tunnel-like arrangement of structures that form the buccal cavity, we hypothesize that suction feeding utilizing strong negative pressure is employed by this species. Furthermore, we propose that force, rather than speed, is the main characteristic of their feeding. The unique features of the study species substantially expand the known morphospace for tadpoles, particularly among the Acosmanura (Pelobatoidea, Pelodytoidea, and Neobatrachia). Except for Microhylidae, acosmanurans previously described possess limited innovative larval morphologies. Larval carnivory has evolved convergently several times in distant anuran clades and shows structural, behavioral, and functional differences in the known examples. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Hertwig S.T.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Das I.,University Malaysia Sarawak | Schweizer M.,Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern | Brown R.,University of Kansas | Haas A.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Zoologica Scripta | Year: 2012

This study presents the first phylogenetic analysis of the enigmatic Rhacophorus everetti species group and the first description of its unique tadpole. A total sample of 95 12S and 16S mitochondrial rDNA sequences were compiled including new sequence data from 28 rhacophorid species. Based on 1332 and 1407bp, respectively, and on the gap coding method applied, a new hypothesis about the phylogeny of rhacophorid tree frogs from Sundaland was obtained. While Rhacophorus was uncovered as a polyphyletic assemblage, the monophyly of the Bush Frogs of the genus Philautus, including the Rhacophorus everetti-group, is robustly supported. We, therefore, transfer the everetti-group to the genus Philautus. As a second step, we recognise Philautus macroscelis (comb. nov.) from Borneo and P. everetti (comb. nov.) from Palawan as distinct allopatric species. Molecular and morphological evidence clearly indicates that each is a distinct lineage with a unique ancestry and discrete evolutionary fate. Moreover, close phylogenetic relationships of several Philautus species from Borneo to taxa from outside Borneo were recovered; P. everetti and P. macroscelis being the only one example. These findings indicate a complex biogeographical history of Sundaland Bush Frogs, which can only be explained by repeated dispersal and vicariance events between the Asian mainland and the Sunda islands. Finally, a single tadpole discovered on Gunung Kinabalu was matched genetically to P. macroscelis. Features of its peculiar external morphology suggest that this larva is endotrophic and possibly nidicolous. A comparable reproductive biology was formerly unknown in rhacophorid tree frogs. The presence of a free-swimming tadpole in Philautus challenges the notion that terrestrial direct development represents an apomorphic character unambiguously shared by all members of this genus. The implications for the evolution of reproductive modes in Bush Frogs are discussed in a phylogenetic context. © 2011 The Authors. Zoologica Scripta © 2011 The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.


PubMed | University Malaysia Sarawak, Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern and Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Type: | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2014

A new species of stream toad of the genus Ansonia is described from Gunung Murud, Pulong Tau National Park, of northern Sarawak, Malaysia, Borneo. Ansonia vidua, sp. nov., is morphologically distinguished from its Bornean congeners by the following combination of characters: medium size (SVL of adult females 33.5-34.4 mm); body uniformly black-brown in life; absence of a visible pattern on dorsum or limbs; presence of two low interorbital ridges; shagreened skin on dorsum, sides and upper surfaces of the limbs with numerous homogeneously small, rounded warts; first finger shorter than second; reduced webbing between the toes and an absence of a sharp tarsal ridge. Uncorrected genetic distances between related taxa of > 4.3% in 16S rRNA gene support its status as a hitherto undescribed species.


Rotermund N.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg | Guerrero-Kommritz J.,Biozentrum Grindel und Zoologisches Museum Hamburg
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom | Year: 2010

Two species of the bobtail squid Heteroteuthis are reported from the Atlantic Ocean, H. dispar in the North Atlantic Ocean and H. dagamensis in the South Atlantic Ocean. In total 58 individuals were examined, 23 belonging to the species Heteroteuthis dispar and 35 belonging to the species H. dagamensis. All specimens were captured during the Walther Herwig Expeditions 1966, 1968, 1976 and 1982. A full description of both sexes of H. dispar and H. dagamensis is provided. These two species can only be distinguished by means of the male's enlarged suckers on arm pair III. Females are not useful for taxonomic identifications and are morphologically identical in both species. The results do not support the definition of subgenera in this genus. This is the first report for Heteroteuthis dagamensis in the South-West Atlantic Ocean. Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2010.

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