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Monmouth Junction, NJ, United States

Jiang X.,National Health Research Institute | Wang S.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Zhao Y.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Xia Q.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Food and Drug Analysis | Year: 2015

Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are widespread in the world and probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids require metabolic activation to form dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular proteins and DNA leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. At present, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular amino acids and proteins to induced toxicity. We previously reported that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5. H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts that upon reaction with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) formed four DHP-valine-PITC adduct isomers. In this study, we report the absolute configuration and stability of DHP-valine and DHP-valine-PITC adducts, and the mechanism of interconversion between DHP-valine-PITC adducts. © 2015. Source


Zhao Y.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Wang S.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Xia Q.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Gamboa Da Costa G.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | And 3 more authors.
Chemical Research in Toxicology | Year: 2014

Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert toxicity through metabolism to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. To date, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular constituents, including amino acids and proteins, resulting in toxicity. Metabolism of carcinogenic monocrotaline, riddelliine, and heliotrine produces dehydromonocrotaline, dehyroriddelliine, and dehydroheliotrine, respectively, as primary reactive metabolites. In this study, we report that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts. For structural elucidation, DHP-valine adducts were derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) to DHP-valine-PITC products. After HPLC separation, their structures were characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, 1H NMR, and 1H-1H COSY NMR spectral analysis. Two DHP-valine-PITC adducts, designated as DHP-valine-PITC-1 and DHP-valine-PITC-3, had the amino group of valine linked to the C7 position of the necine base, and the other two DHP-valine-PITC products, DHP-valine-PITC-2 and DHP-valine-PITC-4, linked to the C9 position of the necine base. DHP-valine-PITC-1 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-3, and DHP-valine-PITC-2 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-4. Reaction of dehydroriddelliine and dehydroheliotrine with valine provided similar results. However, reaction of valine and dehydroretronecine (DHR) under similar experimental conditions did not produce DHP-valine adducts. Reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with rat hemoglobin followed by derivatization with PITC also generated the same four DHP-valine-PITC adducts. This represents the first full structural elucidation of protein conjugated pyrrolic adducts formed from reaction of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids with an amino acid (valine). In addition, it was found that DHP-valine-2 and DHP-valine-4, with the valine amino group linked at the C7 position of the necine base, can lose the valine moiety to form DHP. (Chemical Equation Presented). © 2014 American Chemical Society. Source


Liu Y.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Liu Y.,University of Maryland University College | Wu H.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Chong Y.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | And 6 more authors.
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces | Year: 2015

Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols. © 2015 American Chemical Society. Source


Ma L.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Zhao H.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Xia Q.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) | Cai L.,Biotranex LLC | Fu P.P.,National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)
Journal of Food and Drug Analysis | Year: 2015

Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are hepatotoxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic in experimental animals. Because of their widespread distribution in the world, PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Upon metabolism, PAs generate reactive dehydro-PAs and other pyrrolic metabolites that lead to toxicity. Dehydro-PAs are known to react with glutathione (GSH) to form 7-GSH-(+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (7-GS-DHP) in vivo and in vitro and 7,9-diGS-DHP in vitro. To date, the phototoxicity of GS-DHP adducts has not been well studied. In this study, we synthesized 7-GS-DHP, a tentatively assigned 9-GS-DHP, and two enantiomeric 7,9-diGS-DHP adducts by reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with GSH. The two 7,9-diGS-DHPs were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and their structures were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectral analysis. Photoirradiation of 7-GS-DHP, 9-GS-DHP, and the two 7,9-diGS-DHPs as well as dehydromonocrotaline, dehydroheliotrine, and the 7-R enantiomer of DHP (DHR), by UVA light at 0 J/cm2, 14 J/cm2, and 35 J/cm2 in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, all resulted in lipid peroxidation in a light dose-responsive manner. The levels of lipid peroxidation induced by the two isomeric 7,9-diGS-DHPs were significantly higher than that by 7-GS-DHP and 9-GS-DHP. When 7,9-diGS-DHP was irradiated in the presence of sodium azide (NaN3), the level of lipid peroxidation decreased; lipid peroxidation was enhanced when methanol was replaced by deuterated methanol. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is a product induced by the irradiation of 7,9-diGS-DHP. When irradiated in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD), the level of lipid peroxidation decreased, indicating that lipid peroxidation is also mediated by superoxide. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that 7,9-diGS-DHPs are phototoxic, generating lipid peroxidation mediated by ROS. © 2015, Food and Drug Administration, Taiwan. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved. Source


Xia Q.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Chiang H.-M.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Chiang H.-M.,China Medical University at Taichung | Yin J.-J.,U.S. Food and Drug Administration | And 4 more authors.
Toxicology and Industrial Health | Year: 2015

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a prototype for studying carcinogenesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We have long been interested in studying the phototoxicity of PAHs. In this study, we determined that metabolism of BaP by human skin HaCaT keratinocytes resulted in six identified phase I metabolites, for example, BaP trans-7,8-dihydrodiol (BaP t-7,8-diol), BaP t-4,5-diol, BaP t-9,10-diol, 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OH-BaP), BaP (7,10/8,9)tetrol, and BaP (7/8,9,10)tetrol. The photocytotoxicity of BaP, 3-OH-BaP, BaP t-7,8-diol, BaP trans-7,8-diol-anti-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), and BaP (7,10/8,9)tetrol in the HaCaT keratinocytes was examined. When irradiated with 1.0 J/cm2 UVA light, these compounds when tested at doses of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5 1/4M, all induced photocytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. When photoirradiation was conducted in the presence of a lipid (methyl linoleate), BaP metabolites, BPDE, and three related PAHs, pyrene, 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP trans-7,8-diol, and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP trans-9,10-diol, all induced lipid peroxidation. The formation of lipid peroxides by BaP t-7,8-diol was inhibited by NaN3 and enhanced by deuterated methanol, which suggests that singlet oxygen may be involved in the generation of lipid peroxides. The formation of lipid hydroperoxides was partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Electron spin resonance spin trapping experiments indicated that both singlet oxygen and superoxide radical anion were generated from UVA photoirradiation of BPDE in a light dose responding manner. © SAGE Publications. Source

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