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Shekhawat M.S.,Biotechnology Laboratory | Kannan N.,Biotechnology Unit | Manokari M.,Biotechnology Laboratory
South African Journal of Botany | Year: 2015

An efficient micropropagation protocol has been developed successfully for Morinda coreia Buch.-Ham. by culturing nodal segments. The explants were washed, sterilized with HgCl2 and inoculated on semi-solid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing various concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators (PGRs). Shoot bud initiation was observed after one week and 8.6±0.32 shoots (per explant) harvested after five weeks on MS medium with 4.0mgl-1 concentration of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). The regenerated shoots were further multiplied on semi-solid MS medium augmented with 2.0mgl-1 BAP+1.0mgl-1 Kinetin (Kin). Maximum 24.5±0.34 shoots per explant was obtained after five weeks on this media combination. The long (4-5cm) and healthy shoots were rooted in vitro with 100% success rate on half strength MS medium+1.0mgl-1 indole-3 butyric acid (IBA). Rooting and acclimatization were achieved simultaneously by ex vitro rooting method using 200mgl-1 IBA for 5min with very good success rate (28.67±05.51 roots per shoot with 100% response). The rooted shoots were transferred to the greenhouse for acclimatization for 4-5weeks. The hardened plantlets were finally shifted to the field for further growth in the natural conditions after another five weeks. This is the first report on micropropagation of M. coreia, which can be successfully used for the large-scale multiplication and conservation of germplasm of this important medicinal plant. © 2015 South African Association of Botanists.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

GSK to Present New Evolutions in Targeted RNA Drug Delivery Systems SMi Reports: 8th Annual 2017 RNA Therapeutics Summit takes place on 22nd and 23rd February in Central London. London, United Kingdom, November 18, 2016 --( With a focus on mRNA vaccines, the talk will delve further into key topics surrounding immune responses, animal models, platform technology and rapid response to emerging infectious diseases. In the run-up to his address, Dr Ulmer said, “RNA therapeutics, including recent exciting advancements in RNA-based vaccines, have the potential to be game-changing technologies. This conference will bring together thought leaders from across the technology area..." Now in its 8th year, the RNA event will aim to deliver a scientific toolkit of ideas to implement targeted delivery and mRNA. Attendees will not only learn about new academic research, but will also hear a selection of case studies from big pharma and bio-pharmaceutical companies currently making medical progress through RNA therapeutics. Other notable speakers on the agenda include: · Nagy Habib, Head of Surgery, Co-Founder, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, MiNA Therapeutics Heinrich Haas, Vice President RNA Formulation & Drug Delivery, BioNTech RNA Pharmaceuticals Bo Rode Hansen, Global Head of RNA Therapeutics, Roche John Johnston, Clinical Assessor Biologicals & Biotechnology Unit, MHRA Nicole Meisner-Kober, Senior Investigator, RNA Biology, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research Steve Hood, Director, Bioimaging, GSK David Giljohann, CEO, Exicure Shai Erlich, Chief Medical Officer & President USA, Quark Pharmaceuticals Inc Amotz Shemi, CEO, SilenseedSanyogitta Puri, Associate Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca SMi’s 8th annual RNA Therapeutics conference will take place on 22nd & 23rd February 2017 at the Copthorne Tara Hotel in Kensington, London, UK. Further information including a detailed agenda and full speaker line-up is available at www.therapeutics-rna.com Contact Information: For all media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.uk To register for the conference, visit http://www.therapeutics-rna.com or contact Fateja Begum Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6184 / Email: fbegum@smi-online.co.uk To sponsor, speak or exhibit at the conference, contact Alia Malick on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6168 / Email: amalick@smi-online.co.uk About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world's most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk London, United Kingdom, November 18, 2016 --( PR.com )-- SMi Group are thrilled to have Jeffrey Ulmer, Head of Preclinical Research & Development from GSK, present a keynote at RNA Therapeutics 2017 when it returns to Central London next February.With a focus on mRNA vaccines, the talk will delve further into key topics surrounding immune responses, animal models, platform technology and rapid response to emerging infectious diseases.In the run-up to his address, Dr Ulmer said, “RNA therapeutics, including recent exciting advancements in RNA-based vaccines, have the potential to be game-changing technologies. This conference will bring together thought leaders from across the technology area..."Now in its 8th year, the RNA event will aim to deliver a scientific toolkit of ideas to implement targeted delivery and mRNA. Attendees will not only learn about new academic research, but will also hear a selection of case studies from big pharma and bio-pharmaceutical companies currently making medical progress through RNA therapeutics.Other notable speakers on the agenda include:· Nagy Habib, Head of Surgery, Co-Founder, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, MiNA TherapeuticsHeinrich Haas, Vice President RNA Formulation & Drug Delivery, BioNTech RNA PharmaceuticalsBo Rode Hansen, Global Head of RNA Therapeutics, RocheJohn Johnston, Clinical Assessor Biologicals & Biotechnology Unit, MHRANicole Meisner-Kober, Senior Investigator, RNA Biology, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical ResearchSteve Hood, Director, Bioimaging, GSKDavid Giljohann, CEO, ExicureShai Erlich, Chief Medical Officer & President USA, Quark Pharmaceuticals Inc Amotz Shemi, CEO, SilenseedSanyogitta Puri, Associate Principal Scientist, AstraZenecaSMi’s 8th annual RNA Therapeutics conference will take place on 22nd & 23rd February 2017 at the Copthorne Tara Hotel in Kensington, London, UK.Further information including a detailed agenda and full speaker line-up is available at www.therapeutics-rna.comContact Information:For all media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.ukTo register for the conference, visit http://www.therapeutics-rna.com or contact Fateja BegumTel: +44 (0)20 7827 6184 / Email: fbegum@smi-online.co.ukTo sponsor, speak or exhibit at the conference, contact Alia Malick on Tel: +44 (0)20 7827 6168 /Email: amalick@smi-online.co.ukAbout SMi Group:Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world's most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


Gutierrez-Dominguez D.E.,Renewable Energy Unit | Pacheco-Catalan D.E.,Renewable Energy Unit | Patino-Diaz R.,CINVESTAV | Canto-Canche B.,Biotechnology Unit | Smit M.A.,Renewable Energy Unit
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy | Year: 2013

Enzymatic-polymeric electrodes are prepared by immobilizing the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in polypyrrole, potentiostatically electrodeposited onto carbon paper. The applied enzymatic immobilization procedures are direct adsorption and crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Electrodes are characterized by cyclic voltammetry, showing that ethanol oxidation occurs at around 0 V (versus calomel) for the enzymatic electrodes. Recorded current values due to ethanol oxidation in enzymatic polymeric electrodes are higher by two orders of magnitude, than those recorded for ethanol oxidation in carbon enzyme electrodes. The polymeric enzymatic electrodes crosslinked with glutaraldehyde show higher current values than those with adsorbed enzyme, reflecting a better retention of the protein in the electrode, and preserve catalytic activity for longer times. Spectrophotometric measurements are performed in order to determinate enzymatic activity. Fuel cell test show better performance for the crosslinked enzymatic electrode. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Souza A.L.A.,National Institute of Science and Technology on Innovation on Neglected Diseases INCT IDN | Diaz-Dellavalle P.,Biotechnology Unit | Cabrera A.,Biotechnology Unit | Larranaga P.,Biotechnology Unit | And 4 more authors.
Peptides | Year: 2013

An analysis of a series of five peptides composed of various portions of the pleurocidin (Plc) sequence identified a l2-amino acid fragment from the C-terminus of Plc, designated Plc-2, as the smallest fragment that retained a antimicrobial activity comparable to that of the parent compound. MIC tests in vitro with low-ionic-strength medium showed that Plc-2 has potent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus but not against Enterococcus faecalis. The antifungal activity of the synthetic peptides against phytopathogenic fungi, such as Fusarium oxysporum, Colletotrichum sp., Aspergillus niger and Alternaria sp., also identified Plc-2 as a biologically active peptide. Microscopy studies of fluorescently stained fungi treated with Plc-2 demonstrated that cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes were compromised in all strains of phytopathogenic fungi tested. Together, these results identify Plc-2 as a potential antimicrobial agent with similar properties to its parent compound, pleurocidin. In addition, it demonstrated that the KHVGKAALTHYL residues are critical for the antimicrobial activity described for pleurocidin. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Thalapati S.,Biotechnology Unit | Batchu A.K.,Biotechnology Unit | Neelamraju S.,Biotechnology Unit | Ramanan R.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Functional and Integrative Genomics | Year: 2012

Chromosomal segments from wild rice species Oryza rufipogon, introgressed into an elite indica rice restorer line (KMR3) using molecular markers, resulted in significant increase in yield. Here we report the transcriptome analysis of flag leaves and fully emerged young panicles of one of the high yielding introgression lines IL50-7 in comparison to KMR3. A 66-fold upregulated gene Os11Gsk, which showed no transcript in KMR3 was highly expressed in O. rufipogon and IL50-7. A 5-kb genomic region including Os11Gsk and its flanking regions could be PCR amplified only from IL50-7, O. rufipogon, japonica varieties of rice-Nipponbare and Kitaake but not from the indica varieties,KMR3 and Taichung Native- 1. Three sister lines of IL50-7 yielding higher than KMR3 showed presence of Os11Gsk, whereas the gene was absent in three other ILs from the same cross having lower yield than KMR3, indicating an association of the presence of Os11Gsk with high yield. Southern analysis showed additional bands in the genomic DNA of O. rufipogon and IL50-7 with Os11Gsk probe. Genomic sequence analysis of ten highly co-expressed differentially regulated genes revealed that two upregulated genes in IL50-7 were derived from O. rufipogon and most of the downregulated genes were either from KMR3 or common to KMR3, IL50-7, and O. rufipogon. Thus, we show that Os11Gsk is a wild rice-derived gene introduced in KMR3 background and increases yield either by regulating expression of functional genes sharing homology with it or by causing epigenetic modifications in the introgression line. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Ozturk M.,Ege University | Dogan Y.,Dokuz Eylül University | Sakcali M.S.,Fatih University | Doulis A.,Biotechnology Unit | Karam F.,Lebanese ARI
Journal of Environmental Biology | Year: 2010

The objective was to examine the adaptation strategies of four maquis species to drought prone environments; typical of the east Mediterranean area in degraded and healthy sites in Turkey. A comparison made between sites for Pistacia lentiscus and Quercus coccifera shows higher net daily photosynthesis in the degraded site, when compared with the healthy site; but Ceratonia siliqua and Olea oleaster exhibited no difference in their photosynthetic activity in environmentally contrasting conditions. The pattern of daily transpiration shows higher values in the degraded site in the case of P. lentiscus and Q. coccifera, while no site effect was observed for C. siliqua and O. oleaster. In the case of Q. coccifera, a behavior similar to C. siliqua was observed. A comparison made between C. siliqua and O. oleaster to observe seasonal differences in daily patterns of net photosynthesis and transpiration reveals that Q. coccifera had the highest water use efficiency (slope= 2.88; r 2= 0.61), followed by C. siliqua (slope= 2.74; r2= 0.7), P. lentiscus (slope= 2.56; r2= 0.52; and O. oleaster (slope= 2.40; r2 = 0.78). Olea oleaster and P. lentiscus performed as a drought tolerant species, being more resistant to aridity and thus indicative of the degradation state of the site. Ceratonia siliqua and Q. coccifera were found avoiding drought by adopting first a water-spending strategy, and then a water-saving strategy. © Triveni Enterprises.


Datta S.,Indian Institute of Pulses Research | Tiwari S.,Azad University of Agriculture and Technology | Kaashyap M.,Indian Institute of Pulses Research | Gupta P.P.,Indian Institute of Pulses Research | And 3 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2011

Molecular markers have emerged as useful tools to assess the genetic diversity across crops. In lentil, molecular markers are limited. The objective of the study was to explore crossgenera transferability of sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) markers from related legumes and assess their utility in lentils. Thirty lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. subsp. culinaris) accessions were evaluated for genetic similarity analysis using cross-genera STMS markers. Thirty-nine STMS markers amplified 68 alleles with an average of 1.74 alleles per locus. Twenty lentil-specific STMS markers produced a total of 36 amplicons, of which 90% (18) markers were polymorphic. A maximum of four alleles were obtained with primers SSR13 and SSR19. Of 47 STMS markers from other legume genera, only 19 markers produced 32 scorable amplicons, and only 58% (11) of the amplified markers exhibited polymorphism. The polymorphism information content values observed with lentil specific markers ranged from 0.02 to 0.99, while for transferrable markers it ranged from 0.06 to 0.84. Maximum genetic similarity was observed between 'NDL1' and 'LH84-8' (0.942) and minimum between 'PL234' and 'Precoz' (0.709). The dendrogram based on Jaccard's similarity coefficients showed limited genetic variability among the cultivars included in the present study. A combination of lentil-specific and transferrable STMS markers was successfully used for identification of genetic similarity in lentil germplasm. © Crop Science Society of America.


Perera P.I.P.,Agrobiodiversity Research Area | Quintero M.,Agrobiodiversity Research Area | Dedicova B.,Biotechnology Unit | Kularatne J.D.J.S.,Decision and Policy Analysis Research Area | Ceballos H.,Agrobiodiversity Research Area
AoB PLANTS | Year: 2013

Background and aims: Cassava (Manihot esculenta), a major food staple in the tropics and subtropics, thrives even in environments undergoing threatening climate change. To satisfy the increasing demand for crop improvement and overcome the limitations of conventional breeding, the introduction of inbreeding techniques such as the production of doubled haploid lines via androgenesis or gynogenesis offers advantages. However, comprehensive studies on cassava flower bud biology or structural development are lacking and precise structural and biological information is a prerequisite to enhance the efficiency of these techniques. Methodology: The floral biology of three selected cassava lines was studied, focusing on morphology, phenology and pollen biology (quantity, viability and dimorphism). Histological studies were also conducted on microsporogenesis/microgametogenesis and megasporogenesis/ megagametogenesis to generate precise developmental data for these lines. Principal results: Male and female cyathia have distinct developmental phases. Pollen viability was high during immature stages of plant development; however, pollen mortality was common at later stages. Pollen trimorphism in male gametophytes towards the larger or smaller pollen size, as compared with normal size, was observed. Ten characteristic events were identified in male gametogenesis and six in female gametogenesis that were correlated with flower bud diameter. Male gametophyte diameter at different developmental stages was also determined. Conclusions: Results indicate that the three lines did not differ significantly, except regarding a few morphological aspects such as plant height, flower colour and number of male cyathia. Pollen grains were initially viable, but viability decreased drastically at later stages of growth. Abnormal meiosis or mitosis triggered pollen trimorphism. The demonstrated sequential events of reproductive development generated valuable information at the cellular level, which will help close the current information gap for cassava improvement via breeding programmes and doubled haploid plant production. © 2013 The Authors.


Avila T.,Biotechnology Unit | Avila T.,Catholic University of Leuven | Blair M.W.,Cornell University | Reyes X.,Biotechnology Unit | Bertin P.,Catholic University of Leuven
Plant Genetic Resources: Characterisation and Utilisation | Year: 2012

The Southern Andes, especially the inter-Andean valleys of south Bolivia, is thought to be a probable point of domestication within the primary centre of diversity for Andean common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The national Phaseolus germplasm collection of Bolivia is maintained by the Pairumani Foundation and consists of 449 accessions where most of the accessions are of common bean but some are of related cultivated and wild species. The goal of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of this collection by sampling 174 accessions of P. vulgaris and an outgroup of eight Phaseolus augusti, two Phaseolus lunatus and one Phaseolus coccineus genotype. The genetic diversity and population structure were estimated using 29 microsatellite markers. High levels of polymorphism were found, with a total of 311 alleles identified and an average of 10.7 alleles per marker. Correspondence analysis and an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean-based dendrogram distinguished P. vulgaris from the other species of Phaseolus. Common bean accessions were separated into two groups: the first one including Andean controls and most accessions from high altitudes with morphological characteristics and growth habits typical of this gene pool; the second one including Mesoamerican controls and accessions from low altitudes. Inside the Andean gene pool, the wild accessions were diverse and separated from the weedy and cultivated accessions. Low geographical distances between collection sites (up to 100km) were shown to be related to low genetic distances. These results are important for the conservation of common beans in the Southern Andes. © Copyright 2012 NIAB.


PubMed | University Blaise Pascal, CNRS Ecobiological Interactions, Biotechnology Unit, Coventry University and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Plant molecular biology | Year: 2016

X-Intrinsic Proteins (XIP) were recently identified in a narrow range of plants as a full clade within the aquaporins. These channels reportedly facilitate the transport of a wide range of hydrophobic solutes. The functional roles of XIP in planta remain poorly identified. In this study, we found three XIP genes (HbXIP1;1, HbXIP2;1 and HbXIP3;1) in the Hevea brasiliensis genome. Comprehensive bioinformatics, biochemical and structural analyses were used to acquire a better understanding of this AQP subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that HbXIPs clustered into two major groups, each distributed in a specific lineage of the order Malpighiales. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that only HbXIP2;1 was expressed in all the vegetative tissues tested (leaves, stem, bark, xylem and latex), suggesting that HbXIP2;1 could take part in a wide range of cellular processes. This is particularly relevant to the rubber-producing laticiferous system, where this isoform was found to be up-regulated during tapping and ethylene treatments. Furthermore, the XIP transcriptional pattern is significantly correlated to latex production level. Structural comparison with SoPIP2;1 from Spinacia oleracea species provides new insights into the possible role of structural checkpoints by which HbXIP2;1 ensures glycerol transfer across the membrane. From these results, we discuss the physiological involvement of glycerol and HbXIP2;1 in water homeostasis and carbon stream of challenged laticifers. The characterization of HbXIP2;1 during rubber tree tapping lends new insights into molecular and physiological response processes of laticifer metabolism in the context of latex exploitation.

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