Biotechnology Trust Africa

Nairobi, Kenya

Biotechnology Trust Africa

Nairobi, Kenya

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Peters A.R.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Domingue G.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Olorunshola I.D.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Thevasagayam S.J.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | And 3 more authors.
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

A total of 558 farmers were interviewed in the districts of Kakamega and Machakos in Kenya during 2007-08 regarding their family circumstances and agricultural activities. Approximately 60% were in the age range 20 to 49 while almost 40% were more than 49 years old and 60% of respondents were females. They had spent a variable length of time in farming from <10 to more than 40 years. The average size of farm holding was between 0.4 and 2.0 hectares and almost all respondents were involved in mixed farming (crops and livestock). Livestock species discussed included poultry, cattle and small ruminants and were kept in a range of combinations. Most poultry keepers had between 1 and 20 chickens. Crops included maize, beans and cowpeas and a range of others including horticultural activities. Most farms had to provide supplementary feed to livestock which included hay, napier grass and maize stalks for ruminants and flour residue, maize and commercial feeds for poultry. Respondents used eggs and poultry meat for domestic consumption and surpluses were sold either from the house or at market, sometimes involving an intermediate trader. Additional income from produce sales was used to purchase domestic items including food and fuel.


Peters A.R.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Domingue G.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Olorunshola I.D.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | Thevasagayam S.J.,Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines | And 3 more authors.
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

A total of 558 farmers were interviewed in the counties of Kakamega and Machakos in Kenya during 2007-08 regarding their attitudes and practices relating to livestock diseases and their recognition and management. Most respondents regarded East Coast fever (ECF), contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) and Newcastle Disease (ND) as the most important diseases of cattle, small ruminants and chickens, respectively. There was a high degree of awareness and past use of vaccines and treatments for a number of cattle diseases and these activities were most likely to be carried out by a veterinarian. There was less use of vaccines in small ruminants and chickens but disease treatments were commonly used. Poultry vaccines were purchased from veterinarians and from agrovet shops. Less than half the respondents believed vaccines to be effective but few reported suspected ineffective vaccinations to a veterinary officer. Most respondents (Kakamega only) were willing to pay up to 5Ksh, 10Ksh and 20Ksh for chicken, small ruminant and cattle vaccines, respectively. Respondents preferred the administration of poultry vaccines to be via drinking water and most preferred vaccination on an individual farm basis rather than group vaccination activities. Almost all the respondents expressed the need for training in poultry vaccination. Respondents expressed a preference for vaccine pack sizes of less than 50 doses and for the availability of thermo-tolerant vaccines.

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