Biotechnology Institute Thurgau BITG

Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Biotechnology Institute Thurgau BITG

Kreuzlingen, Switzerland
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Spies E.,University of Konstanz | Reichardt W.,University Hospital Freiburg | Alvarez G.,University of Konstanz | Groettrup M.,University of Konstanz | And 2 more authors.
Molecular Therapy | Year: 2012

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in men in western industrialized countries. As a public health burden, the need for the invention of new cost-saving PCa immunotherapies is apparent. In this study, we present a DNA vaccine encoding for the prostate-specific antigen prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) linked to the J-domain and the SV40 enhancer sequence. The PAP DNA vaccine induced a strong PAP-specific cellular immune response after electroporation (EP)-based delivery in C57BL/6 mice. Splenocytes from mice immunized with PAP recognized the naturally processed PAP epitopes, indicating that vaccination with the PAP-J gene broke its self-tolerance against PAP. Remarkably, DNA vaccination with PAP-J inhibited tumor growth in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse model that closely resembled human PCa. Therefore, this study highlights a novel cancer immunotherapy approach with the potential to control PCa in clinical settings. © The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy.


Ohlschlager P.,University of Konstanz | Spies E.,University of Konstanz | Alvarez G.,University of Konstanz | Quetting M.,University of Konstanz | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2011

Therapeutic DNA vaccination is an attractive adjuvant option to conventional methods in the fight against cancer, like surgery radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Despite strong antitumor effects that were observed in small animals with different antigens, DNA-based vaccines remain weakly immunogenic in large animals and primates compared to protein-based vaccines. Here, we sought to enhance the immunogenicity of a therapeutic nontransforming cervical cancer DNA vaccine (HPV-16 E7SH) by introduction of a highly optimized CpG cassette into the plasmid backbone as well as by an optimized DNA delivery using an advanced electroporation (EP) technology. By integrating the means for agent administration and EP into a single device, this technology enables a simple, one-step procedure that facilitates reproducibility. We found that highly optimized CpG motifs alone triggers an enhanced IFN-Iγ and granzyme B response in Elispot assays as well as stronger tumor regression. Furthermore, these effects could be dramatically enhanced when the CpG cassette containing plasmid was administered via the newly developed EP technology. These data suggest that an optimized application of CpG-enriched DNA vaccines may be an attractive strategy for the treatment of cancer. Collectively, these results provide a basis for the transfer of preclinical therapeutic DNA-based immunization studies into successful clinical cancer trials. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

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