Saint Paul, MN, United States
Saint Paul, MN, United States

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Trademark
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2016-07-11

Dental implants; dental prostheses; parts of dental prostheses; dental implant parts. Education and training services relating to new surgical concepts and techniques; education and training services relating to new surgical concepts and techniques applied to dental implantology; organization and conducting of conferences, courses, congresses, seminars and symposiums relating to new surgical concepts and techniques; organization and conducting of conferences, courses, congresses, seminars and symposiums relating to new surgical concepts and techniques applied to dental implantology. Medical services; medical surgery services; dental surgery services; information, planning, professional consultancy in the field of dental surgery; information, planning, professional consultancy relating to new surgical concepts and techniques applied to dental implantology.


The object of the invention is the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or other applicable diseases by means of the intranasal administration of a composition obtained from at least one growth-factor-containing blood compound, or by means of a therapeutic substance obtained from said composition, in addition to the composition itself. It is guaranteed that the composition reaches the central nervous system in an effective manner in terms of the treatment, and also in a safe manner for the patient.


Patent
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2016-12-14

Mandibular advancement device (1; 20) and a device preparation method and kit, comprising a mouthpiece (2) and at least one plastic strap (5; 21) with two ends (7) fitted with a slot (9) that is connected articulately to a respective cylindrical portion (11) of a lateral protrusion (10) of the mouthpiece (2). The slot (9) is closed and is longer in length than the diameter of the cylindrical portion (11), which can move along the slot (9). The strap (5; 21) acts by traction between the cylindrical portions (11) of the mouthpiece (2) to prevent the free return of the lower portion (4) with respect to the upper portion (3) of the mouthpiece (2) and therefore treats apnea, whilst allowing some advancement and lateral movement of the lower portion (4), making it comfortable for the user.


Formulation comprising, or derived from, an initial blood composition, wherein the formulation is rich in platelets and/or growth factors and proteins originating from the initial blood composition, and wherein the proteins are in a gelled state. The invention also refers to method for preparing the formulation, comprising the steps of heating and then cooling the initial blood composition at certain temperatures and times. Among other advantages, the formulation in accordance with the invention is biocompatible and biodegradable, presents the desirable biological or medical properties provided by the presence of platelets or growth factors, and also presents high dimensional stability over time.


An adapter device (1) for reducing or eliminating the potential bacterial contamination in a process of extraction or transfer of blood components from at least one container (3) to a recipient or any applicable destination, thereby increasing user safety, that comprises a body (2) provided with at least one first area (2a) designed to be approached or attached to at least one container (3) and at least one second area (2b) designed to remain accessible to the exterior, and at least one needle (7) that projects from each first area (2a) and is capable of piercing a pierceable area (3a) of a container (3). The needle (7) presents an inner tube (8) that communicates with an inner tube (9) of the body (2), which in turn leads to an opening (4) in a second area (2b), and at least one flexible part (10) that maintains each inner tube (9) of the body (2) closed.


Bti

Trademark
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2016-11-01

Sanitary products for medical use; materials for dressings, namely, gauze; teeth filling and dental impression materials; biomaterials for medical use, namely, implants comprising living tissue; pharmaceutical and veterinary products in general, namely, ampoules containing pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental disease; materials for dressings, namely, bandages for dressings and medicated compresses; adhesive tapes for sanitary purposes, namely, sticking medical plasters; medical plasters; preparations for regenerating bone tissue; medical kits consisting of pharmaceutical preparations in the form of activating substances for use mixed with blood plasma, materials for dressings, bandages and tapes for sanitary purposes and plasters for wounds, all for the purpose of manufacturing blood plasma; dental restoration compounds; dental ceramics. Scientific apparatus and instruments, namely, distillation apparatus for scientific purposes; apparatus for centrifuging blood, namely, laboratory centrifuges; furnaces for laboratory use; pipettes; computer software for facilitating the scheduling of dental surgery. Dental implants and parts and components thereof; dental prostheses for implantation in teeth and components of dental prostheses for implantation in teeth; bone prostheses; dropping pipettes for medical use; medical instruments for capturing, dosing and transferring liquids in general and blood plasma in particular, especially, instruments comprising a cannula through which blood plasma is captured and a tube into which the captured plasma is directly transferred; medical and surgical apparatus and instruments for use in dental surgery; surgical dental apparatus and instruments; apparatus and instruments for use in preparing and fitting dentures; apparatus and instruments for use in dental surgery; apparatus for analyzing blood, in particular, tubes for collecting blood, surgical compressors for medical purposes and needles, laboratory apparatus for the treatment of blood, tubes for collecting blood samples, compresses for medical purposes and needles for medical purposes, all included in a kit for use in manufacturing blood plasma; ultrasound apparatus and instruments for use in medical surgery; electro-surgical motor for use in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Wholesale store services, retail store services, and on-line retail store services via global computer networks, all featuring goods for use in dental treatment, surgical, medical and dental apparatus and instruments, and artificial prostheses including dental implants and parts and components thereof.


Patent
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2015-10-21

A method for producing a porous calcium polyphosphate structure, which comprises the steps of mixing monocalcium phosphate (MCP) with silicic acid, and sintering the mixture at a predefined temperature or temperatures for a predefined time, after which the porous calcium polyphosphate is obtained. The method allows a porous biomaterial with a controllable porosity to be obtained, and which also has the ability to activate the platelets in a plasma rich in platelets and cause the release of growth factors from the platelets.


Patent
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2014-11-05

Metal structure that serves as an internal support to a dental prosthesis, comprising at least two support posts (1) designed to be attached on respective dental implants (10), and at least one rod (3) for connecting two adjacent support posts (1), where at least one support post (1) comprises at least one protruding element (4a, 4b) that projects from its side, and at least one rod (3) that comprises a first end (5) provided with a blind hole (6) designed to receive a first protruding element (4a) of a support post (1), thus providing an articulated connection that acts like a ball joint, and a longitudinal recess (7) designed to receive a second protruding element (4b) of the adjacent support post (1). This structure is easy to prepare and to assemble.


Trademark
Biotechnology Institute | Date: 2016-03-08

Dental prosthesis parts; dental implant parts; buttress implants; buttress implants for dental purposes; dental implants.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Washington, DC - Dec. 20, 2016 - Results from a placebo-controlled trial provide a strategy for improving fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The study, published online this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, identified microorganisms that are key for cure with fecal microbiota transplantation. "This paper provides us data with which microbes to supplement into our preparations," said principal investigator of the study Michael Sadowsky, PhD, director of the BioTechnology Institute at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. Approximately 20% to 30% of patients who are treated with antibiotics for C. difficile get a recurrent infection. Typically, this is caused by a dysbiosis or microbial imbalance of the gut. Microbiota are integral to human physiology and health, and exposure to antibiotics can alter the composition and activity of microbiota, sparking many common health problems. In the last decade, FMT has been increasingly used to treat patients who have recurrent C. difficile infection, with cure rates over 90%. The procedure involves collecting fecal matter from a healthy donor, purifying microbiota from the feces, mixing it with saline solution, and placing it in a patient, usually by colonoscopy. Eight years ago, the University of Minnesota established the Microbiota Therapeutics Program, through which patients can receive fecal microbiota transplants. In the new study, Dr. Sadowsky and colleagues conducted a clinical trial in 27 patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, using fecal microbiota from healthy patients (a heterologous transplant) and, as a placebo, the patient's own stool microbes (an autologous transplant). The cure rate with the transplantation from healthy donors was 90%, which is what the researchers expected, but surprisingly several patients who received the transplant with their own stool were also cured. Those who did not respond to the autologous transplant went on to receive a heterologous transplant. Using Illumina-based next-generation sequencing to characterize bacterial communities, the researchers found that subjects cured by what was supposed to be the placebo transplantation had a greater abundance of Clostridium Xia clade and Holdemania prior to treatment, and the relative abundance of these microorganisms significantly increased after transplantation, compared to heterologous transplant and pre-transplant samples. Additional analyses showed that the microbiota of patients cured by the autologous transplant remained distinct from that of patients cured by the heterologous transplant. The researchers also found that once the donor's fecal microbiota became established in the patient, it didn't stay static, but changed over time. Previous studies have shown that a couple weeks after a fecal microbiota transplant from a healthy donor, a patient's microbiota usually looks very similar to the donor's microbiota. "As opposed to what we thought, complete engraftment of microbiota is not required to cure a patient," said Dr. Sadowsky. "The study provides insight into which microorganisms are the most important for curing C. difficile and may allow clinicians to better tailor therapy, by improving the donor material to facilitate a more rapid, effective, and lasting cure." The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of over 48,000 scientists and health professionals. ASM's mission is to promote and advance the microbial sciences. ASM advances the microbial sciences through conferences, publications, certifications and educational opportunities. It enhances laboratory capacity around the globe through training and resources. It provides a network for scientists in academia, industry and clinical settings. Additionally, ASM promotes a deeper understanding of the microbial sciences to diverse audiences.

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