BioSonics Inc.

Seattle, United States

BioSonics Inc.

Seattle, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Meecham A.,Northern Defense Industries Inc | Acker T.,BioSonics Inc.
Proceedings - International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology | Year: 2017

The vulnerability of military installations and critical infrastructure sites from underwater threats is now well accepted and, in order to combat these security weaknesses, there has been growing interest in - and adoption of - sonar technology. Greater availability of Autonomous/Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (A/UUVs) to both adversary nations and terrorists/saboteurs is also a cause of increasing concern. The small size and low acoustic target strength/signature of these vehicles presents significant challenges for sonar systems. The well-known challenges of the underwater environment, particularly in a harbor or port setting, can lead to a Nuisance Alarm Rate (NAR) that is higher than that of traditional security sensors (e.g. CCTV). This, in turn, can lead to a lack of confidence from end users and a possibility that 'real' alerts are incorrectly dism issed. In the past this has been addressed by increasing the capability of individual sensors, leading to ever-increasing sensor complexity, however, the relationship between sensor performance and complexity/cost is highly non-linear. Even with the most complex and capable sensors, the fundamental limit to performance is often limited by acoustics, not sensor capability. In this paper we describe an alternative approach to reducing NAR and improving detection of difficult targets (e.g. UUVs), through intelligent combination and fusion of outputs from multiple sensors and data/signal processing algorithms. We describe the statistical basis for this approach, as well as techniques, methodologies and architectures for implementation. We describe the approach taken in our prototype algorithms/system, as well as quantitative and qualitative results from testing in a real-world environment. These results show a significant reduction in NAR and increase in classiflcation/alert range. Finally, we describe current focus areas for algorithmic and system development in both the short and medium term, as well as future extensions of these techniques to more classes of sensors, so that more challenging problems can be addressed. © 2016 IEEE.


Xu J.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Deng Z.D.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Carlson T.J.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Moore B.,BioSonics Inc
Marine Technology Society Journal | Year: 2012

A major criterion for permitting the deployment of tidal turbines in Washington State's Puget Sound is management of risk of injury to killer whales from collision with moving turbine blades. An active monitoring system is being proposed to detect and track killer whales within proximity of turbines and alert turbine operators of their presence and location to permit temporary turbine shutdown when the risk of collision is high. Knowledge of the target strength (TS) of killer whales is critical to the design and application of active acoustic monitoring systems. In 1996, a study of the TS directivity of a 2.2-m-long bottlenose dolphin at an in sonifying frequency of 67 kHz was performed. Noting that killer whales, which are dolphins, are morphologically similar to bottlenose dolphins and then assuming allometry, we estimated the relative broadside and tail aspect TS of a 7.5-m-long adult killer whale at an in sonifying frequency of 67 kHz to be -8 and -28 dB, respectively. We used a three-layer model for plane wave reflection of sound at 200 kHz from the lung of killer whales to estimate their TS. We assessed the accuracy of our killer whale TS estimates by comparing them with TS estimates of free swimming killer whales obtained using a split-beam active acoustic system operating at 200 kHz. The killer whale TS estimates based on the preliminary model were in good agreement with those obtained for free swimming killer whales.


Greene C.H.,Cornell University | Meyer-Gutbrod E.L.,Cornell University | McGarry L.P.,Cornell University | Hufnagle L.C.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | And 7 more authors.
Oceanography | Year: 2014

Possessing the world’s largest Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), the United States enjoys the benefits of a multi-billion dollar commercial fishing industry. Along with these benefits comes the enormous task of assessing the status of the nation’s commercial fish stocks. At present, many of the most valuable commercial fish stocks are assessed using acoustic surveys conducted from manned survey vessels. The expense and limited availability of ship time often compromise the quantity and quality of the acoustic stock assessment data being collected.Here, we describe our vision for how an unmanned mobile platform, the Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, can be used in large numbers to supplement manned survey vessels and transform fisheries acoustics into a science more consistent with the new ocean-observing paradigm. Wave Gliders harness wave energy for propulsion and solar energy to power their communications, control, navigation, and environmentalsensing systems. This unique utilization of wave and solar energy allows Wave Gliders to collect ocean environmental data sets for extended periods of time.Recently, we developed new technology for Wave Gliders that enable them to collect multifrequency, split-beam acoustic data sets comparable to those collected with manned survey vessels. A fleet of Wave Gliders collecting such data would dramatically improve the synoptic nature as well as the spatial and temporal coverage of acoustic stock assessment surveys. With improved stock assessments, fisheries managers would have better information to set quotas that maximize yields to fishermen and reduce the likelihood of overfishing. Improved observational capabilities also would enable fisheries scientists and oceanographers to more closely monitor the responses of different fish stocks to climate variability and change as well as ocean acidification. © 2014 Oceanography Society. All Rights Reserved.


Pawlowicz R.,University of British Columbia | McClure B.,BioSonics Inc.
MTS/IEEE Seattle, OCEANS 2010 | Year: 2010

In the fall of 2009 a 3-frequency (38, 123, and 210 kHz) upward-looking echo sounder was deployed in 95m of water at the inshore Folger Passage node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. NEPTUNE (North-East Pacific Time-Series Undersea Networked Experiments) is an 800 km cabled ocean observation system off the Pacific coast of Canada which is now online and operational. The system supplies DC power to permanently sited instruments, and supports a bi-directional high-bandwidth datastream using optical fibres. Echo sounding at the Folger node currently takes place at 1 Hz for all 3 frequencies, interleaved with pings from other acoustic equipment at the node. This data is returned in real-time to a shore station, and is then archived and accessed via a Data Management and Archiving System (DMAS). Preliminary investigations of the first 4 months of the datastream show a wealth of information about the temporal variation of fish, zooplankton, and bubbles, which are themselves related to fish behavior and surface conditions. Significant variations occur over scales from 10 minutes to seasonal. The NEPTUNE observatory is designed for a lifetime of 20 years, and the acoustic record should allow for the investigation of long-term changes in biological conditions on the west coast of Canada. ©2010 IEEE.


Munday E.,BioSonics Inc. | Moore B.,BioSonics Inc. | Burczynski J.,BioSonics Inc.
OCEANS 2013 MTS/IEEE - San Diego: An Ocean in Common | Year: 2013

This paper reports a test in Puget Sound, Seattle WA, using a new aquatic habitat assessment system consisting of a single beam echosounder (BioSonics MX) and specialized post-processing analysis and mapping software (BioSonics Visual Habitat). Data were collected and processed to generate quantitative measurements of seagrass height and percent coverage, substrate type, and bathymetry. Results were favorable when compared to video data and visual observation and other ground truth measurements. © 2013 MTS.


Munday E.,BioSonics Inc. | Acker T.,BioSonics Inc. | Dawson J.,BioSonics Inc.
OCEANS 2013 MTS/IEEE - San Diego: An Ocean in Common | Year: 2013

The science of fisheries acoustics and its applicability to resource management have evolved over the past several decades. The use of hydroacoustics for the assessment of fisheries resources is well established and split beam echosounders are now the standard instrument of scientific fisheries acoustics. To augment the information gained from mobile hydroacoustic surveys, researchers have developed innovative methods and devices to facilitate the use of split beam echosounders in new situations and environments. This document provides a description of three recent inventions that facilitate the use of split beam echosounders in non-conventional application; a hybrid split beam and imaging sonar system tested for defense related applications, an autonomous, submersible echosounder for long-term seafloor observation, and a towed echosounder specifically engineered for use with a self-propelled, autonomous surface vehicle. © 2013 MTS.


McClure R.,BioSonics Inc. | Acker T.,BioSonics Inc. | Dawson J.,BioSonics Inc.
MTS/IEEE Seattle, OCEANS 2010 | Year: 2010

In the search for non-petroleum based energy, development of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy (MHK) projects is proceeding at an exciting pace around the world. There are a myriad of devices (wave, tidal, thermal) and locations (metropolitan, remote, nearshore and offshore) being considered for development of ocean energy projects. One thing that they all have in common is that the biological resources at the project site must be understood and the relationship between these resources and the project must be addressed. MHK power generation relies on the dynamic nature of the physical environment, which is paralleled by the dynamic nature of the biological environment and brings into question the dynamic of continuous interaction of biological resources with the project infrastructure. Therefore, it is important to have information not only of the presence and absence of plants and animals in the environment, but of both the "normal" and project imposed variations in the abundance, distribution, and behavior of these biological components. From the resident and migratory fish to marine mammals which may transit the area, all must be addressed during project development, piloting, and operation. These environmental considerations are of concern to government agencies, environmental regulators, the public, as well as the project developer and their investors when assessing potential ocean energy sites. In the United States, the MMC and FERC have committed to streamlined permitting processes to allow projects to move ahead quickly in order to prove their viability - this includes their environmental viability. There are few proposed MHK energy project sites that have a continuous set of data on the habitat, pelagic invertebrates, fish, and marine mammals, addressing the abundance, distribution, and behavior on annual, seasonal, or daily variations. Seasonal or annual "snapshots" are often available, but are often associated with fisheries or protection and focus on specific behaviors or seasons and leave large gaps in the understanding of temporal variation in abundance and behavior. Recently, based on hydroacoustic (SONAR) technology, automated and continuous monitoring of MHK sites has provided both developers and regulators with the ability to collect and analyze high spatial and temporal resolution information on the changes in biological abundance and behavior at project sites. These monitoring and analysis systems provide information on the location and abundance of fish and other organisms in the water column, direction of travel, relative size, and abundance. Measured on a scale of seconds and duration of months to years, this information enables has proven useful for both planning installation and operation of power generation systems. Further developments and automation are now enabling realtime "biological triggering", changes in operation initiated by the presence and abundance of fish in the vicinity of operating equipment. An added benefit of continuous monitoring may be protection from drifting debris which could prove detrimental to the operation of these MHK devices. ©2010 IEEE.


Patent
BioSonics Inc. | Date: 2013-12-04

A sonar transducer network for observing a seabed includes a controller. A first transducer assembly includes a first acoustic transducer to convert a first ping to a first electrical signal; and a first transducer processor to receive a first electrical signal from the first acoustic transducer to generate the first transducer data. At least one second transducer assembly is spaced apart from the first transducer assembly. The second transducer assembly includes a second acoustic transducer to convert a second ping to a second electrical signal. The second transducer processor receives the second electrical signal from the second acoustical transducer to generate second transducer data. A network bus communicates first transducer data and second transducer data with the controller.


Patent
Biosonics Inc. | Date: 2011-08-23

A sonar transducer network for observing a seabed includes a controller. A first transducer assembly includes a first acoustic transducer to convert a first ping to a first electrical signal; and a first transducer processor to receive a first electrical signal from the first acoustic transducer to generate the first transducer data. At least one second transducer assembly is spaced apart from the first transducer assembly. The second transducer assembly includes a second acoustic transducer to convert a second ping to a second electrical signal. The second transducer processor receives the second electrical signal from the second acoustical transducer to generate second transducer data. A network bus communicates first transducer data and second transducer data with the controller.


Patent
BioSonics Inc. | Date: 2010-01-27

A sonar transducer network for observing a seabed includes a controller. A first transducer assembly includes a first acoustic transducer to convert a first ping to a first electrical signal; and a first transducer processor to receive a first electrical signal from the first acoustic transducer to generate the first transducer data. At least one second transducer assembly is spaced apart from the first transducer assembly. The second transducer assembly includes a second acoustic transducer to convert a second ping to a second electrical signal. The second transducer processor receives the second electrical signal from the second acoustical transducer to generate second transducer data. A network bus communicates first transducer data and second transducer data with the controller.

Loading BioSonics Inc. collaborators
Loading BioSonics Inc. collaborators