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Patent
Biosensors | Date: 2015-04-29

A combination physiologic status sensor system is described. It integrates a highly efficient reflectance oximeter, acquisition of a 2-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) heart rate signal, a photonic indicator of molecular products of anaerobic metabolism, and a skin temperature sensor. Placement of this motion tolerant sensor system may be on the adult or child subjects upper arm or infant chest, or chest and abdomen, for acquisition of high quality signals. Efficient use of battery power, combined optionally with wireless communications, enables continuous ambulatory use for extended periods of time. The comprehensive physiologic profile provided by this multi-factorial sensor and analysis system is anticipated to be of benefit in providing physiologically important, actionable information in a wide range of applications, including athletic training and performance, high risk occupational safety monitoring, and critical and convalescent medical care of patients of all ages and sizes.


Patent
Biosensors | Date: 2016-12-05

An automated apparatus and method for coating medical devices such as an intravascular stent, are disclosed in the method, a 2-D image of a stent is processed to determine (1) paths along the stent skeletal elements by which a stent secured to a rotating support element can be traversed by a dispenser head whose relative motion with respect to the support element is along the support-element axis, such that some or all of the stent skeletal elements will be traversed (2) the relative speeds of the dispenser head and support element as the dispenser head travels along the paths, and (3), and positions of the dispenser head with respect to a centerline of the stent elements as the dispenser head travels along such paths The rotational speed of the support and relative linear speed of the dispenser are controlled to achieve the desired coating thickness and coating coverage on the upper surfaces, and optionally, the side surfaces, of the stent elements


Merkoci A.,Biosensors
Biosensors and Bioelectronics | Year: 2010

The need for novel biosensing systems has increased enormously in the last few years. In this context nanoparticles with special optical and electrochemical properties are bringing significant advantages in fields such as clinical analysis, environmental monitoring, food and safety/security control. Biosensor technology represents an interesting alternative for the development of efficient, fast, low-cost and user-friendly biosensing devices. Between different biosensing alternatives the nanotechnology and nanomaterial oriented biosensors represent very attractive and cost-efficient tools for real sample applications. The developed devices are based on the use of various platforms which allows their future applications and extension in several fields. Optical detection alternatives based on light absorption and scattering, surface plasmon resonance enhancement, fluorescence (including its quenching strategies) between other methods will be discussed. In addition, a special emphasis on electrical methods (electromechanical, stripping analysis, potentiometric etc.) that use nanoparticles as tracers for biomolecules detection will be given. In most of the examples nanoparticle-based biosensing systems are being offered as excellent screening and advantageous alternatives to existing conventional strategies/assays and the corresponding equipments. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Parolo C.,Biosensors | Merkoci A.,Biosensors | Merkoci A.,Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

In this review we discuss how nanomaterials can be integrated in diagnostic paper-based biosensors for the detection of proteins, nucleic acids and cells. In particular first the different types and properties of paper-based nanobiosensors and nanomaterials are briefly explained. Then several examples of their application in diagnostics of several biomarkers are reported. Finally our opinions regarding future trends in this field are discussed. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Patent
Biosensors | Date: 2016-01-26

A sensor, especially for a reactor, bioreactor, or a clinical or animal research application, is disclosed including a sensor probe having at least one sensor unit associated therewith, each sensor unit including a hydrogel, a magnetic sheet disposed on one side of the hydrogel, and a magnetometer disposed on a side of the hydrogel opposite the magnetic sheet.


A system and method are provided to detect target analytes based on magnetic resonance measurements. Magnetic structures produce distinct magnetic field regions having a size comparable to the analyte. When the analyte is bound in those regions, magnetic resonance signals from the sample are changed, leading to detection of the analyte.


A method for predefining a set of radioactive-emission measurement views, for radioactive-emission imaging after an administration of a radiopharmaceutical, the method being tailored to a specific body structure and optimized with respect to the information gained about the body structure and based on modeling body-structure, based on its geometry and anatomical constraints, which limit accessibility to the body structure.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.98K | Year: 2016

This SBIR Phase I project will benefit society by reducing the cost of manufacturing biologic pharmaceuticals and improving their quality, including pharmaceuticals that are currently too costly to manufacture because they target relatively small patient populations. The proposed innovation will advance state-of-the-art by providing a continuous in-situ multi-analyte sensor enabling novel methods of drug quality assurance. This multi-analyte sensor will allow biopharmaceutical companies, for the first time, to monitor the concentration of the product in-situ as it is being produced along with the concentrations of other important culture analytes. The sensor array will have the unique ability to measure time dependent correlations between pH, osmolality, and concentrations of glucose, lactate and monoclonal antibodies. This ability unlocks new avenues for optimizing upstream biopharmaceutical production which consumes about 35% of biologic drug cost of goods. Efficient control of upstream processes using sensors such as the one proposed is expected to reduce these costs up to 30%. Furthermore, this technology can be directed towards other analytes by replacing the sensing molecules. Thus, the proposed technology can be used as a sensing platform in biopharmaceutical manufacturing or in medical diagnostics, food processing, and water quality. This project will demonstrate the feasibility of adapting newly discovered affinity ligands for bioprocess sensing; thereby obtaining the first in-situ biosensor that can be used to monitor the concentration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during manufacturing in real time. This biosensor will be based on a novel magnetically transduced stimuli-responsive hydrogel containing affinity ligands that target mAbs. This antibody sensor will be integrated into an existing in-situ bioreactor sensor array capable of monitoring other key parameters: pH, osmolality, glucose, and lactate. Thus, the proposed sensor array will be a powerful tool to advance process analytics and biomanufacturing. Product feasibility will be demonstrated via three objectives: 1) Synthesize a novel magnetically transduced stimuli-responsive hydrogel containing affinity ligands that specifically bind to mAbs. 2) Incorporate the hydrogel of objective 1 into a sensor suitable for monitoring the concentration of mAbs in cell culture media in the concentration range relevant to biomanufacturing. 3) Integrate the antibody sensor into an existing sensor array and demonstrate its performance under typical antibody manufacturing conditions. This adaptable technology can be leveraged towards a number of protein targets; thus the proposed project represents a transformative approach that will advance scientific knowledge of biosensing across a multitude of applications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 224.98K | Year: 2016

This SBIR Phase I project will benefit society by reducing the cost of manufacturing biologic pharmaceuticals and improving their quality, including pharmaceuticals that are currently too costly to manufacture because they target relatively small patient populations. The proposed innovation will advance state-of-the-art by providing a continuous in-situ multi-analyte sensor enabling novel methods of drug quality assurance. This multi-analyte sensor will allow biopharmaceutical companies, for the first time, to monitor the concentration of the product in-situ as it is being produced along with the concentrations of other important culture analytes. The sensor array will have the unique ability to measure time dependent correlations between pH, osmolality, and concentrations of glucose, lactate and monoclonal antibodies. This ability unlocks new avenues for optimizing upstream biopharmaceutical production which consumes about 35% of biologic drug cost of goods. Efficient control of upstream processes using sensors such as the one proposed is expected to reduce these costs up to 30%. Furthermore, this technology can be directed towards other analytes by replacing the sensing molecules. Thus, the proposed technology can be used as a sensing platform in biopharmaceutical manufacturing or in medical diagnostics, food processing, and water quality.

This project will demonstrate the feasibility of adapting newly discovered affinity ligands for bioprocess sensing; thereby obtaining the first in-situ biosensor that can be used to monitor the concentration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during manufacturing in real time. This biosensor will be based on a novel magnetically transduced stimuli-responsive hydrogel containing affinity ligands that target mAbs. This antibody sensor will be integrated into an existing in-situ bioreactor sensor array capable of monitoring other key parameters: pH, osmolality, glucose, and lactate. Thus, the proposed sensor array will be a powerful tool to advance process analytics and biomanufacturing. Product feasibility will be demonstrated via three objectives: 1) Synthesize a novel magnetically transduced stimuli-responsive hydrogel containing affinity ligands that specifically bind to mAbs. 2) Incorporate the hydrogel of objective 1 into a sensor suitable for monitoring the concentration of mAbs in cell culture media in the concentration range relevant to biomanufacturing. 3) Integrate the antibody sensor into an existing sensor array and demonstrate its performance under typical antibody manufacturing conditions. This adaptable technology can be leveraged towards a number of protein targets; thus the proposed project represents a transformative approach that will advance scientific knowledge of biosensing across a multitude of applications.


Patent
Biosensors | Date: 2016-02-23

Solutions for non-invasively monitoring blood metabolite levels of a patient are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes: repeatedly measuring a plurality of electromagnetic impedance readings with a sensor array from: an epidermis layer of a patient and one of a dermis layer or a subcutaneous layer of the patient, until a difference between the readings exceeds a threshold; calculating an impedance value representing the difference using an equivalent circuit model and individual adjustment factor data representative of a physiological characteristic of the patient; and determining a blood metabolite level of the patient from the impedance value and a blood metabolite level algorithm, the blood metabolite level algorithm including blood metabolite level data versus electromagnetic impedance data value correspondence of the patient.

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