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The present invention relates to inventive novel industrialized method for preparing purified extract containing more abundant active ingredients such as catalpol derivatives from the extract of Pseudolysimachion rotundum var subintegrum than that prepared by the conventional preparation method disclosed in the prior art and the therapeutics or functional health food comprising the purified extract for treating and preventing inflammatory, allergic or asthmatic disease. The purified extract showed more potent anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy and anti-asthma activity than that prepared by the conventional preparation method disclosed in the prior art through various in vivo tests such as inhibition test on the reproduction of eosinophil, the release of immunoglobulin and inflammatory chemokines in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid as well as the suppression of airway hyperresponsiveness and goblet cell hyperplasia in a OVA-sensitized/challenged mouse model.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Helen Torley, M.B, Ch.B., came across an interesting statistic last year. Out of the 44 publicly traded biotech companies in the thriving life science hub of San Diego, there was only one female CEO: her. The report, released in 2016 by UK-based executive recruitment firm Liftstream, found that only 2 percent of biotech companies in San Diego have a female CEO, while the national average is between 7 and 9 percent. Since taking the reins as CEO of Halozyme Therapeutics three years ago, Torley knew from first-hand experience that the gender balance was skewed, as she was often one of only a few women among 50 men at CEO networking events. However to find out that the numbers were quite so low was “certainly a surprise,” she told Bioscience Technology. That trend in biotech is not exclusive to the CEO role, though. A new study this year from Liftstream of 177 biotechs that went public from 2012 through 2015 found that women held only 10 percent of board positions. One positive note was that nearly 58 percent of the studied boards had a woman on them, which is up from 48 percent reported in Lifstream’s 2014 survey. The new report also found that gender diversity at the leadership level is associated with business advantages. Companies that had at least one female board member saw an average share price increase of 19 percent, while those with all-male board members showed a 9 percent decrease. So why are women being underrepresented in the top levels of biotech organizations? Torley, who has become more interested in and vocal about this topic since seeing recent statistics, broke this question down into three parts: When it comes to the first factor, Torley does not think it is a matter of under training. “If you look at the graduates of all the major business schools, 40 percent of Columbia, Harvard, MIT are women,” she said. “So certainly we’re getting business-trained women.” The same goes for the percentage of women graduating with STEM degrees, which is rising all the time, Torley, who first started out as a physician training in rheumatology, said. As for the pipeline of women, Torley referenced a 2016 McKinsey & Company study about the state of women in corporate America. “What we see is that women, in general, are less likely to be promoted, less likely to get developmental opportunities, and less likely to have meaningful interactions with senior management or have a sponsor for their career,” she said. The concept of sponsorship, which will be discussed later, is very important to Torley. Women drop off at every promotional level, according the McKinsey report, with the percentage getting lower and lower at each higher rung of the corporate ladder. For first time CEO’s, the majority come from what in biotech is called a line function position, where they’re in a role such as the head or VP of a business unit, Torley said. At senior levels, studies show that women often shift from line to staff roles, such as in human resources or finance. By the time they reach the SVP level, women hold only 20 percent of line roles, which hurts their chances of getting a CEO position, the McKinsey report found. “So women are not moving up the chain and being given the types of jobs you need to have to prepare you to be a CEO,” Torley said. While Torley said women are obviously making progress in getting to higher levels, she noted there is certainly data to suggest an unconscious bias can be at play during the selection process where companies don’t develop a diverse candidate pool or choose a male over a female. Also, from her own experience, though not while at Halozyme, she said she has seen unconscious bias at play and been in “plenty of discussions” where a promotion is on the table and people in the room discussing candidates would say things like ‘well she won’t be able to move she’s got young children’ or ‘I know her husband and he’s got a great job so they won’t move,’ or even worry that a female candidate could become pregnant. It’s very important that filters aren’t on, and companies should understand that in today’s world work life balance issues are just as important for males as females, she noted. The good news, Torley said, is that all of these issues can be addressed with attention and effort. “It’s a multifactorial situation, and there’s room for improvement at every step.” One important aspect of career development that many women lack is a sponsor.  Women tend to have mentors, which are great and can give advice and guidance, but as a general rule, Torley said, mentors are not in a position to specifically advance a woman’s career. In contrast, men tend to have a network that includes sponsorship—a person who is actively engaged in helping them find jobs and provide opportunities. It is only in retrospect that Torley realized how important sponsors were to her success and advancement, and that she was extremely fortunate to have numerous ones as her career progressed. For example, when she was up for a big promotion early in her career as a rheumatologist, she admits she may not have been the most scientifically qualified but the head consultant sponsored her to be the person he wanted in that role. Then, when she moved to Novartis to head up ongoing phase 3 studies, she wanted to switch from the medical side of the company to marketing and business. She tried for a year, but no one listened to her until a new head of marketing came in. When Torley asked to be moved, he decided to take a chance on her and the next day she found herself heading up a launch. Later, Torley had the same experience at Amgen, where she was working on the rheumatoid arthritis drug Enbrel. The head of sales and marketing came into her office and asked if she wanted to head up a business unit, and that opportunity helped her make the difficult transition to enter into a line leadership function that helped prepare her for her future as a CEO. Torley credits having these sponsors who were willing to take a chance on her. “I was probably at 80 percent of the qualifications, but they said ‘I think she’s got the potential, let me sponsor her in this role, support her and help her to be successful.” Unfortunately, women don’t have sponsors as often as men.


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Paris-based Nanobiotix is a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company that is spearheading efforts to harness physics rather than biology, as a way to destroy cancer cells. Founded in 2003 by CEO Laurent Levy, Ph.D., as a spin-off the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo, the company's novel approach uses nanoparticles to boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and, potentially, immunotherapies. Levy, who has been working in the nanotechnology field for two decades, spoke to Bioscience Technology about the company’s lead product NBTXR3, and how it can enhance radiotherapy for a number of indications currently in clinical trials. The company’s first foray is into radiotherapy, also known as radiation therapy, and was chosen for a few reasons, Levy said.  For one, it is one of the most widely used treatments in oncology, with 60 percent of all cancer patients receiving radiotherapy during treatment. Secondly, it is a patient population that are usually untapped by the pharmaceutical or biotech companies, so there is a widely open market with a patient population that does not have many treatment opportunities outside of radiotherapy.  Finally, when a physician wants to eradicate a tumor with radiation, the x-ray beam also has to go through healthy tissue too, often causing damage, which limits the dose that can be delivered. “So the key question is, how can we improve the dose within the tumor, without increasing the dose in surrounding healthy tissue?” Levy said. “We have developed a technology exactly to answer this question.” Based on nanotechnology, the company developed an inorganic, crystalline nanoparticle that is 50 nanometers, made with hafnium oxide. This particular material was chosen because it is a highly dense material that has the ability to absorb x-rays. Also, the material is super inert, Levy explained, so it’s able to optimize the benefit/risk ratio for patients.  The benefit being the amount of x-ray absorption, and minimizing the risk by having an inert material with low toxicity. “So the goal of the company is really to try to transform today’s radiotherapy into nanoradiotherapy,” Levy said. “To make it more efficient and less toxic.” The company now has a pipeline of seven indications ongoing, including its most clinically advanced which is a Phase 2/3 in soft tissue sarcoma ongoing in Europe and Asia.  They also have two different clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients and one in prostate cancer patients running in the U.S., as well as early clinical trials in liver cancers. Nanobiotix plans to present data from it's European Phase 1/2 head and neck cancer trial at the American Sociatey of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in June. Levy said that the company has such a wide pipeline because the product has a physical mode of action and potentially could be applied across oncology. The only change to current patient flow is that patients receive a one-time injection of the nanoparticle, directly into the tumor one day before the first session of radiotherapy. Once the nanoparticles enter tumor cells, they are activated by standard dose of radiation and release a tremendous amount of energy that destroys cancer cells, while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues, which only receive the same dose of radiation as is standard in radiotherapy. The soft-tissue sarcoma trial is a two-arm trial involving 156 patients, with half receiving radiotherapy alone, and half receiving radiotherapy plus Nanobiotix’s nanoparticles. At the end of March the Independent Data Monitoring Committee recommended a continuation of the Phase 2/3 trial after completing an interim evaluation of the trial, based on an analysis of the results of two-thirds, or 104 patients. The primary endpoint in the prospective, randomized, multi-center, open label and active controlled study is the complete pathological response rate. Secondary endpoints include the objective response rate by MRI imaging, evaluation of safety profile, and tumor volume changes. A full data analysis is expected by the end of 2017, and NBTXR3 could obtain European market approval later this year. While the company has not disclosed plans for its pathway in the U.S. market, Levy said the company also has one Investigational New Drug application open in the U.S., and its goal is to move forward in the U.S., along with Europe, once it sees more data from its head and neck cancer trial. Levy believes their novel approach has the potential to impact many cancers. “From our perspective, we think that the beauty of nanotechnology is that you bring a completely different mode of action into the oncology field,” he said. With a biological approach, Levy said, one could take hundreds of cancer cells, some of which will be destroyed by chemo, some that will not be destroyed at all because they don’t express the right receptor, and some that will start dying but will then develop some resistance and regrow again. “When you use physics, you bring something that a cancer cell cannot resist,” he said. Coming up, Nanobiotix hopes to present more data by mid-year supporting an approach to use their lead product in combination with immuno-oncology drugs.


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Clinical-stage microbiome company, Rebiotix Inc., announced positive top line results from it’s prospective, multicenter, open-label, controlled Phase 2 study for the prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff). The broad spectrum microbiota drug, RBX2660, had a success rate of 78.8 percent for the primary efficacy endpoint of preventing C. diff recurrence, compared to a historical control of 51.8 percent, the company reported. Results evaluated responses from 132 patients who received two doses of the drug, which is meant to rehabilitate the gut microbiome and end the cycle of C. diff recurrence, compared to a 110 antibiotic only treated historical controls over an eight week period.  Patients that received RBX2660, received one dose the first day, and a second one week later. The study was meant to test safety and efficacy, and Rebiotix reported that the therapy was generally well-tolerated. The most common side effects were gastrointestinal events, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain and constipation. The Food and Drug Administration granted the drug Orphan Drug status, Fast Track status and Breakthrough Therapy Designation for the prevention of recurrent C. diff infection. In an interview with Bioscience Technology in February, Rebiotix CEO, Lee Jones said that the company anticipates enrollment of a Phase 3 trial to begin in June. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated there about 29,000 deaths associated with C.diff infections a year, and termed it an urgent public health threat. Antibiotics are the current standard of care, but the infection returns in about 25 percent of patients, and the risk of recurrence continues to grow every time the infection comes back. In 2014 Rebiotix raised $25 million in series B round fundraising, and hopes to close on series C funding in 2017, Lee said.


The present invention relates to novel pterocarpan compound or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof and a composition for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disease or complications thereof comprising the same as an active ingredient. The novel pterocarpan compound of the present invention isolated from soybean leaves inhibits -glucosidase activity and hACAT activity, and suppresses LDL-oxidation efficiently. Therefore, the compound of the present invention not only can be effectively used for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disease or complications thereof but also can be effectively used as an anti-oxidative composition owing to its excellent anti-oxidative activity.


Patent
Bioscience Technology | Date: 2013-09-16

Provided are a complex microbial flora, an application thereof in preparing a textile fabric, a cellulose for use as an additive, and a biological bacterial solution pulp, and a method for using the complex microbial flora. The complex microbial flora comprises Bacillus sp. of deposit number CGMCC No. 5971, Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, Acinetobacter Iwoffi of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975. The method provided comprises: formulation of a bacterial solution, processing of raw materials, and preparation or pulping of the fiber. In one embodiment, the invention generally includes at least one Bacillus. Sp. under CGMCC Deposit No. 5971 alone or in the presence of other microorganisms as a complex microbial flora, and their applications thereof.


Patent
Bioscience Technology | Date: 2013-09-16

Provided are a complex microbial flora, an application thereof in preparing a textile fabric, a cellulose for use as an additive, and a biological bacterial solution pulp, and a method for using the complex microbial flora. The complex microbial flora comprises Bacillus sp. of deposit number CGMCC No. 5971, Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, Acinetobacter Iwoffii of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975. The method provided comprises: formulation of a bacterial solution, processing of raw materials, and preparation or pulping of the fiber. In one embodiment, the invention generally includes at least one Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975, either alone or in the presence of other microorganisms as a complex microbial flora, and their applications thereof.


Patent
Bioscience Technology | Date: 2013-09-16

Provided are a complex microbial flora, an application thereof in preparing a textile fabric, a cellulose for use as an additive, and a biological bacterial solution pulp, and a method for using the complex microbial flora. The complex microbial flora comprises Bacillus sp. of deposit number CGMCC No. 5971, Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, Acinetobacter lwoffii of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975. The method provided comprises: formulation of a bacterial solution, processing of raw materials, and preparation or pulping of the fiber. In one embodiment, the invention generally includes at least one Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, either alone or in the presence of other microorganisms as a complex microbial flora, and their applications thereof.


Patent
Bioscience Technology | Date: 2013-09-16

Provided are a complex microbial flora, an application thereof in preparing a textile fabric, a cellulose for use as an additive, and a biological bacterial solution pulp, and a method for using the complex microbial flora. The complex microbial flora comprises Bacillus sp. of deposit number CGMCC No. 5971, Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, Acinetobacter lwoffii of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975. The method provided comprises: formulation of a bacterial solution, processing of raw materials, and preparation or pulping of the fiber. In one embodiment, the invention generally includes at least one Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, either alone or in the presence of other microorganisms as a complex microbial flora, and their applications thereof.


Patent
Bioscience Technology | Date: 2013-09-16

Provided are a complex microbial flora, an application thereof in preparing a textile fabric, a cellulose for use as an additive, and a biological bacterial solution pulp, and a method for using the complex microbial flora. The complex microbial flora comprises Bacillus sp. of deposit number CGMCC No. 5971, Rheinheimera tangshanensis of deposit number CGMCC No. 5972, Acinetobacter lwoffii of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, Pseudomonas fluorescens of deposit number CGMCC No. 5974, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus of deposit number CGMCC No. 5975. The method provided comprises: formulation of a bacterial solution, processing of raw materials, and preparation or pulping of the fiber. In one embodiment, the invention generally includes at least one Acinetobacter lwoffii of deposit number CGMCC No. 5973, either alone or in the presence of other microorganisms as a complex microbial flora, and their applications thereof.

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