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Hesterman J.Y.,Bioscan Inc. | Caucci L.,University of Arizona | Kupinski M.A.,University of Arizona | Barrett H.H.,University of Arizona | Furenlid L.R.,University of Arizona
IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science | Year: 2010

A fast search algorithm capable of operating in multi-dimensional spaces is introduced. As a sample application, we demonstrate its utility in the 2D and 3D maximum-likelihood position-estimation problem that arises in the processing of PMT signals to derive interaction locations in compact gamma cameras. We demonstrate that the algorithm can be parallelized in pipelines, and thereby efficiently implemented in specialized hardware, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). A 2D implementation of the algorithm is achieved in Cell/BE processors, resulting in processing speeds above one million events per second, which is a 20 × increase in speed over a conventional desktop machine. Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used for a 3D application of the algorithm, resulting in processing speeds of nearly 250,000 events per second which is a 250 × increase in speed over a conventional desktop machine. These implementations indicate the viability of the algorithm for use in real-time imaging applications. © 2010 IEEE.


Hu J.,Bioscan Inc. | Zhang X.-E.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Virology
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology | Year: 2011

China has become the country with the largest diabetes mellitus population in the world since the 1990s. About 100 million diabetes cases have been diagnosed since 2008. Handheld blood glucose meters and test strips are urgently needed for daily patient measurement. The glucose monitor with a screen-printed carbon-based glucose electrode has been in commercial production since 1994. Since then, approximately 20 companies have been involved in manufacturing and marketing meters and test strips in China. The current market and production volume and updates on technology issues are discussed in this article. © Diabetes Technology Society.


Trademark
Bioscan Inc. | Date: 2012-11-13

Grooming tools for animals incorporating light therapy.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.68K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall goal of this application is to develop a quantitative in-vivo small animal imaging system for fluorescent reporter probes that fuses fluorescence light emitting computed tomography (FLECT) with X- ray computed tomography (CT). The proposed dual-modality imaging system will not only provide a research tool for better understanding of biological function and processes on a cellular or molecular level in-vivo, but will also aid the development of new drug therapies and accelerate their translation into the clinic. Conventional imaging methods only provide two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence surface images and, hence, do not reveal the actual spatial location and concentration of the targeted reporter system. Furthermore, current fluorescence tomography (FT) systems are still in a developing stage and suffer from several limitations. First, these FT systems assume optically uniform tissue models that, consequently, prohibit the accurate quantification of the reporterprobe's location and concentration. Second, neither planar fluorescence imaging nor FT provides any anatomical information. Hence, the reconstructed reporter probe location cannot be localized relative to the animal's anatomy. The proposed FLECT/CT systemwill overcome these limitations in two ways. First, we will leverage the anatomical information gained from CT with its high spatial resolution and assign optical properties to various segmented organs. These non-uniform optical property maps will in turnimprove quantitative fluorescence image reconstruction leading to accurate images about the reporter probe's actual spatial location and concentration. Second, structural images from CT will provide the anatomical information that is necessary for co-locating the fluorescent reporter probe to the animal's anatomy. In Phase 1, we will perform numerical simulations and tissue phantom experiments that will provide a proof of principle for the proposed FLECT/CT system. We will demonstrate that (1) applying non-uniform optical property maps to FLECT reconstructions makes quantitative tomographic imaging of reporter probes feasible and (2) spatial maps of organs with largely varying optical properties can be segmented from CT images. In Phase 2, a commercial grade FLECT/CT system will be developed where the optical and X-ray components share the same rotating gantry. We will develop fully automated image segmentation methods and different techniques for assigning optical parameters to segmented organs. The opticalparameters will be determined by (1) optical tomography in a reduced parameter space, (2) from known (oxy-)hemoglobin concentrations in different tissue types, or from (3) optical parameter databases of prior experiments. Last, the performance of the FLECT/CT system will be evaluated in small animal imaging experiments. Once completed, our FLECT/CT system will provide a powerful tool for research of cancer, neurological pathologies, and cardiovascular disease. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed development of a combined fluorescence tomography and X-ray CT imaging system for small animals will reconstruct and display the three-dimensional in-vivo distribution of fluorescent reporter probes for studying molecular processes in a living biological system. The combination of fluorescence tomography with X-ray CT will significantly improve the image quality of fluorescence tomographic images and will co-register them to structural CT images showing the animal's anatomy. Therefore, the proposed imaging system would not only be of great significance for better understanding biological processes and pathological function in living small animals on a cellular and molecular level, but would also aid the development of new drug therapies and accelerate their translation into the clinic.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 102.65K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall goal of this application is to develop a quantitative in-vivo small animal imaging system for fluorescent reporter probes that fuses fluorescence light emitting computed tomography (FLECT) with X- ray computed tomography (CT). The proposed dual-modality imaging system will not only provide a research tool for better understanding of biological function and processes on a cellular or molecular level in-vivo, but will also aid the development of new drug therapies and accelerate their translation into the clinic. Conventional imaging methods only provide two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence surface images and, hence, do not reveal the actual spatial location and concentration of the targeted reporter system. Furthermore, current fluorescence tomography (FT) systems are still in a developing stage and suffer from several limitations. First, these FT systems assume optically uniform tissue models that, consequently, prohibit the accurate quantification of the reporter probe's location and concentration. Second, neither planar fluorescence imaging nor FT provides any anatomical information. Hence, the reconstructed reporter probe location cannot be localized relative to the animal's anatomy. The proposed FLECT/CT system will overcome these limitations in two ways. First, we will leverage the anatomical information gained from CT with its high spatial resolution and assign optical properties to various segmented organs. These non-uniform optical property maps will in turn improve quantitative fluorescence image reconstruction leading to accurate images about the reporter probe's actual spatial location and concentration. Second, structural images from CT will provide the anatomical information that is necessary for co-locating the fluorescent reporter probe to the animal's anatomy. In Phase 1, we will perform numerical simulations and tissue phantom experiments that will provide a proof of principle for the proposed FLECT/CT system. We will demonstrate that (1) applying non-uniform optical property maps to FLECT reconstructions makes quantitative tomographic imaging of reporter probes feasible and (2) spatial maps of organs with largely varying optical properties can be segmented from CT images. In Phase 2, a commercial grade FLECT/CT system will be developed where the optical and X-ray components share the same rotating gantry. We will develop fully automated image segmentation methods and different techniques for assigning optical parameters to segmented organs. The optical parameters will be determined by (1) optical tomography in a reduced parameter space, (2) from known (oxy-)hemoglobin concentrations in different tissue types, or from (3) optical parameter databases of prior experiments. Last, the performance of the FLECT/CT system will be evaluated in small animal imaging experiments. Once completed, our FLECT/CT system will provide a powerful tool for research of cancer, neurological pathologies, and cardiovascular disease. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed development of a combined fluorescence tomography and X-ray CT imaging system for small animals will reconstruct and display the three-dimensional in-vivo distribution of fluorescent reporter probes for studying molecular processes in a living biological system. The combination of fluorescence tomography with X-ray CT will significantly improve the image quality of fluorescence tomographic images and will co-register them to structural CT images showing the animal's anatomy. Therefore, the proposed imaging system would not only be of great significance for better understanding biological processes and pathological function in living small animals on a cellular and molecular level, but would also aid the development of new drug therapies and accelerate their translation into the clinic.


Trademark
Bioscan Inc. | Date: 2011-03-15

Medical research devices, namely, computers, gamma cameras, collimators, aperture plates, and computer software, all sold together as a unit for use in high resolution, high sensitivity tomographic image processing and imaging in the field of nuclear medicine.


Trademark
Square 1 Bank and Bioscan Inc. | Date: 2010-09-21

Medical research devices in the field of nuclear medicine, namely, computers, gamma imagers, aperture plates, and computer software, all sold together as a unit for use in high resolution, high sensitivity positron emission tomographic image processing and anatomical imaging to determine the relative location of biomarkers in tomographic images.


Trademark
Bioscan Inc. | Date: 2010-09-21

DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC APPARATUS FOR ANIMAL, INCLUDING HUMAN, USE, NAMELY, ENERGY-GENERATING EQUIPMENT, FOR HEALING BONE AND TISSUE LESIONS.


Trademark
Bioscan Inc. | Date: 2012-12-27

Therapeutic apparatus which uses light for healing bone and tissue lesions for humans and animals.

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