Storrs Mansfield, CT, United States
Storrs Mansfield, CT, United States

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Vaddiraju S.,University of Connecticut | Vaddiraju S.,Biorasis Inc. | Tomazos I.,Biorasis Inc. | Burgess D.J.,University of Connecticut | And 2 more authors.
Biosensors and Bioelectronics | Year: 2010

The development of implantable biosensors for continuous monitoring of metabolites is an area of sustained scientific and technological interests. On the other hand, nanotechnology, a discipline which deals with the properties of materials at the nanoscale, is developing as a potent tool to enhance the performance of these biosensors. This article reviews the current state of implantable biosensors, highlighting the synergy between nanotechnology and sensor performance. Emphasis is placed on the electrochemical method of detection in light of its widespread usage and substantial nanotechnology based improvements in various aspects of electrochemical biosensor performance. Finally, issues regarding toxicity and biocompatibility of nanomaterials, along with future prospects for the application of nanotechnology in implantable biosensors, are discussed. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.


Patent
Biorasis Inc. and University of Connecticut | Date: 2012-08-15

Disclosed herein is a device comprising a biosensor having disposed upon it a coating; the coating comprising a polymer matrix; where the polymer matrix is operative to facilitate the inwards and outwards diffusion of analytes and byproducts to and from the sensing element of the biosensor; and a sacrificial moiety; the sacrificial moiety being dispersed in the polymer matrix, where the sacrificial moiety erodes with time and increases the porosity of the polymer matrix thus offsetting decreases in analyte permeability as a result of biofouling.


Trademark
Biorasis Inc. and Consulting Inc. | Date: 2014-12-15

Blood glucose meter.


A methodology used to pinpoint the location of an implantable biomedical sensing device is provided and is carried out by integrating miniaturized magnets, or materials with magnetic properties into the implantable bio-sensing chip to detect the position of the implant by sensing the induced magnetic field via an external communication unit. Presented here are various configurations in which magnetic positional detection can be carried out. The positional information collected from these detection motifs can be used to provide feedback to the user about alignment status as well as activate a self-alignment methodology. With respect to the former, based on the positional information received the user manually adjusts the location of the external communicator into place to align with the implantable platform. In the latter scenario, various configurations allow the wireless powering and communication components on the proximity communicator to automatically find and align with the implantable biomedical sensing chip.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.12K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Over the past five years Biorasis Inc has been developing a totally implantable biosensor platform x x mm capable of continuously monitoring glucose The underlying principle in developing this miniaturized sensor hinges on extreme miniaturization utilizing light both as a powering source and a communication link Such implant size reduction results in minimal tissue damage during implantation The localized release of various tissue response modifiers has also afforded effective inflammation control and fibrosis suppression needed for long term sensor functionality The sensing element of this platform is based on a novel layer device architecture that yields high performance in terms of selectivity linearity response time and sensitivity In vivo studies have indicated an aggregate mean absolute relative difference MARD value of between our sensor measured glucose levels and reference standards over a period of days While this is already comparable to the transcutaneous sensors currently in market our analysis has shown that the sensor MARD values can be further lowered to if one takes into consideration the variability within the sensing element to permeability changes that affect the diffusion of glucose and other co substrates Objective Hypothesis Correlating the response of the glucose sensing element to the permeability changes for glucose and other co substrates can substantially improve sensor accuracy with MARD values down to for both hypo and hyperglycemic regions over extended periods of time months Study Design This Phase I study will be focused on proof of concept demonstration of the fully integrated device for month in normal and diabetic rats For this our current prototype device will be outfitted with a new electronic chip comprising of two additional potentiostats and sensor select circuitry along with the three sensing elements Furthermore wafer level integration and packaging of the micro optoelectronic components and sensing elements will be carried out for in vivo studies and validation Relevance In view of the growing number of diabetics worldwide there is a tremendous need for devices that provide accurate detection of glucose levels In lieu of the difficulties associated with glucose monitoring using non invasive methods extreme miniaturization of a totally implantable device together with assured accuracy and long term operation present a viable alternative The proposed multi sensing element platform addresses miniaturization and accurate glucose readings In addition the wireless communication and prolonged lifetime render it an effective device for diabetic care as well as a powerful tool for metabolite monitoring in pre clinical animal research PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE The increasing occurrence of diabetes ca and million diabetic patients in US and rest of the world respectively poses a serious health problem especially considering the complications arising from renal failure amputations and other serious conditions The development of a continuous glucose monitoring system will provide the necessary warning to prevent hypo and hyper glycemic events as well as to minimize fluctuations in glucose levels that would otherwise lead to many debilitating complications associated with diabetes In addition the high measurement fidelity afforded by this device will allow safe and accurate glucose sensing that can advance the efforts to realize an artificial pancreas


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a wireless, needle implantable miniaturized (0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm) sensor for continuous glucose monitoring, with provisions for internal self-calibration without the need for frequent, external fingerpricking. The proposed internal self-calibration is enabled through the use of novel pulse-mode sensor operation which quantifies sensitivity drifts internally. Pulsed-mode operation also results in improved power management as well as long sensor lifetime. Biocompatible coatings release various tissue response modifiers to control tissue inflammation. The device can be inserted under the skin and similarly removed via a needle, thus avoiding surgical implantation/removal. Phase-I seeks to develop the internal self-calibration routines and demonstrate proof-of-concept ex vivo. Phase II will focus on extensive in vivo studies thereby facilitating commercialization.

The broader/commercial impacts of this research are enormous considering that there is an urgent need for continuous glucose monitoring devices in view of the growing number of diabetics. Implantable glucose sensors that afford minimal user intervention present a viable alternative, although their user-independent nature is often undermined by necessity for frequent external calibration by finger-pricking. The proposed project will result in a truly user-independent operation of implantable glucose sensors. In addition, the proposed internal calibration methodology is universal to all biosensors used for metabolic monitoring, rendering competitive market edge and job creation. The project will be performed in the Technology Incubation Program (TIP), at University of Connecticut. This industrial/academic collaboration provides training for the graduate and undergraduate students in the field ofbiosensors.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a wireless, needle implantable miniaturized (0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm) sensor for continuous glucose monitoring, with provisions for internal self-calibration without the need for frequent, external fingerpricking. The proposed internal self-calibration is enabled through the use of novel pulse-mode sensor operation which quantifies sensitivity drifts internally. Pulsed-mode operation also results in improved power management as well as long sensor lifetime. Biocompatible coatings release various tissue response modifiers to control tissue inflammation. The device can be inserted under the skin and similarly removed via a needle, thus avoiding surgical implantation/removal. Phase-I seeks to develop the internal self-calibration routines and demonstrate proof-of-concept ex vivo. Phase II will focus on extensive in vivo studies thereby facilitating commercialization. The broader/commercial impacts of this research are enormous considering that there is an urgent need for continuous glucose monitoring devices in view of the growing number of diabetics. Implantable glucose sensors that afford minimal user intervention present a viable alternative, although their "user-independent" nature is often undermined by necessity for frequent external calibration by finger-pricking. The proposed project will result in a truly "user-independent" operation of implantable glucose sensors. In addition, the proposed internal calibration methodology is universal to all biosensors used for metabolic monitoring, rendering competitive market edge and job creation. The project will be performed in the Technology Incubation Program (TIP), at University of Connecticut. This industrial/academic collaboration provides training for the graduate and undergraduate students in the field ofbiosensors.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 696.40K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to develop a wireless, needle implantable miniaturized (0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm) sensor for continuous glucose monitoring, with provisions for internal self-calibration that ultimately eliminates the need for frequent, external finger-pricking. As part of Phase I project, the internal calibration routine has been developed and its ?proof-of-concept? has been demonstrated on an implantable glucose sensor unit operating in porcine serum for a period of 3 weeks. Along these lines, a proximity communicator (wrist-watch like unit) has also been developed which is in operable communication with the implantable unit. Phase II aims to further enhance the reliability of this calibration routine by demonstrating its efficacy in an in vivo environment (rat model) along with advancement of the proximity communicator unit in order to establish a two-way communication with a smartphone capable of real time data processing and implementation of the internal calibration routine. At the end of Phase-II, the completion of developmental activities for the self-calibrating glucose monitoring platform is envisioned, thereby, bringing it a step closer to commercialization in the pre-clinical animal research market (first market of Biorasis Inc.)

The broader/commercial impacts of this project are enormous considering that there is an urgent need for continuous glucose monitoring devices in view of the growing number of diabetic patients. Implantable glucose sensors that afford minimal user intervention present a viable alternative, although their ?user-independent? nature is often undermined by the need for frequent external calibration via painful finger-pricking. The proposed project will result in a truly ?user-independent? operation of implantable glucose sensors. The successful implementation of such an advanced glucose monitoring technology, which can also be adapted for the management of other disorders (such as obesity and cardiovascular complications) will pave way for new jobs in our Stare of Connecticut and neighboring regions in the sectors medical devices, wireless communication and biosensors. The project will be performed in the University of Connecticut (UConn) Technology Incubation Program (TIP) in partnership with UConn collaborators. This industrial/academic collaboration provides training for the graduate and undergraduate students in the field of biosensors, optical powering, chip design and wireless data communication and will motivate them to US industrial competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 486.41K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to develop a wireless, needle implantable miniaturized (0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm) sensor for continuous glucose monitoring, with provisions for internal self-calibration that ultimately eliminates the need for frequent, external finger-pricking. As part of Phase I project, the internal calibration routine has been developed and its ?proof-of-concept? has been demonstrated on an implantable glucose sensor unit operating in porcine serum for a period of 3 weeks. Along these lines, a proximity communicator (wrist-watch like unit) has also been developed which is in operable communication with the implantable unit. Phase II aims to further enhance the reliability of this calibration routine by demonstrating its efficacy in an in vivo environment (rat model) along with advancement of the proximity communicator unit in order to establish a two-way communication with a smartphone capable of real time data processing and implementation of the internal calibration routine. At the end of Phase-II, the completion of developmental activities for the self-calibrating glucose monitoring platform is envisioned, thereby, bringing it a step closer to commercialization in the pre-clinical animal research market (first market of Biorasis Inc.) The broader/commercial impacts of this project are enormous considering that there is an urgent need for continuous glucose monitoring devices in view of the growing number of diabetic patients. Implantable glucose sensors that afford minimal user intervention present a viable alternative, although their ?user-independent? nature is often undermined by the need for frequent external calibration via painful finger-pricking. The proposed project will result in a truly ?user-independent? operation of implantable glucose sensors. The successful implementation of such an advanced glucose monitoring technology, which can also be adapted for the management of other disorders (such as obesity and cardiovascular complications) will pave way for new jobs in our Stare of Connecticut and neighboring regions in the sectors medical devices, wireless communication and biosensors. The project will be performed in the University of Connecticut (UConn) Technology Incubation Program (TIP) in partnership with UConn collaborators. This industrial/academic collaboration provides training for the graduate and undergraduate students in the field of biosensors, optical powering, chip design and wireless data communication and will motivate them to US industrial competitiveness.

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