Biopolis SL

Paterna, Spain

Biopolis SL

Paterna, Spain

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.4-02 | Award Amount: 9.94M | Year: 2012

SYNPOL aims to propel the sustainable production of new biopolymers from feedstock. SYNPOL will thereto establish a platform that integrates biopolymer production through modern processing technologies, with bacterial fermentation of syngas, and the pyrolysis of highly complex biowaste (e.g., municipal, commercial, sludge, agricultural). The R&D activities will focus on the integration of innovative physico-chemical, biochemical, downstream and synthetic technologies to produce a wide range of new biopolymers. The integration will engage novel and mutually synergistic production methods as well as the assessment of the environmental benefits and drawbacks. This integrative platform will be revolutionary in its implementation of novel microwave pyrolytic treatments together with systems-biology defined highly efficient and physiologically balanced recombinant bacteria. The latter will produce biopolymer building-blocks and polyhydroxyalkanoates that will serve to synthesize novel bio-based plastic prototypes by chemical and enzymatic catalysis. Thus, the SYNPOL platform will empower the treatment and recycling of complex biological and chemical wastes and raw materials in a single integrated process. The knowledge generated through this innovative biotechnological approach will not only benefit the environmental management of terrestrial wastes, but also reduce the harmful environmental impact of petrochemical plastics. This project offers a timely strategic action that will enable the EU to lead worldwide the syngas fermentation technology for waste revalorisation and sustainable biopolymer production.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.3-04 | Award Amount: 11.20M | Year: 2013

The INDOX proposal on industrial oxidoreductases aims to provide relevant industrial case stories to demonstrate the efficacy of optimized biocatalysts on targeted reactions, and to establish the processes scalability, sustainability and cost-efficiency versus chemical conversion processes. The chemical industry (specialties excluded) is not yet embracing enzymatic oxidation reactions to a significant extent primarily due to lack of biocatalysts with the required selectivity, availability and compatibility with the rigorous process conditions. Selected industrial oxidation and oxyfunctionalization target reactions form the basis for the INDOX screening and optimization of new biocatalysts, including: i) Intermediates for agrochemicals/APIs; ii) Polymer precursors and functionalized polymers; and iii) Intermediates for dye-stuffs. The project flow comprises: i) Recovery of selective biocatalysts from the groups of heme-peroxidases/peroxygenases, flavo-oxidases and copper-oxidoreductases from fungal genomes and other sources; ii) Improvement of their oxidative activity and stability by protein engineering (using rational design, directed evolution and hybrid approaches combined with computational calculations) to fulfill the operational and catalytic conditions required by the chemical industry; and iii) Optimization of reaction conditions and reactor configurations (including immobilization technologies and new enzymatic cascade reactions). Finally the cost efficiency compared to chemical processing will be evaluated. The INDOX approach is supported by a highly-specialized consortium of SMEs, large companies and research/academic institutions. Production of the new optimized biocatalysts and their introduction into the chemical market will take advantage from the participation of the world-leading company in the sector of industrial enzymes, together with several chemical companies willing to implement the new medium- and large-scale biotransformation processes.


Healthspan (the life period when one is generally healthy and free from serious disease) depends on nature (genetic make-up) and nurture (environmental influences, from the earliest stages of development throughout life). Genetic studies increasingly reveal mutations and polymorphisms that may affect healthspan. Similarly, claims abound about lifestyle modifications or treatments improving healthspan. In both cases, rigorous testing is hampered by the long lifespan of model organisms like mice (let alone humans) and the difficulty of introducing genetic changes to examine the phenotype of the altered genome. We will develop C. elegans as a healthspan model. Already validated extensively as an ageing model, this organism can be readily modified genetically, and effects of environmental manipulations on healthspan can be measured in days or weeks. Once validated as a healthspan model, it can be used for an initial assessment of preventive and therapeutic measures for humans, as well as for risk identification and the initial evaluation of potential biomarkers. It will also prove useful to study interactions between genetic and various environmental factors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.6-01 | Award Amount: 2.57M | Year: 2013

CARODEL aims to valorise the results from the previous FP7 COLORSPORE project, in which initial isolation and characterization work was performed on Bacillus strains producing gastric-stable carotenoids. As the stability in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), antioxidant activity and bioavailability of particular Bacillus carotenoids was shown to be higher than those of common dietary carotenoids, the conclusions from COLORSPORE provided strong and compelling reasons to support further development and commercialisation of these bacteria-derived carotenoids. CARODEL will therefore focus on the development of an efficient oral delivery strategy of such highly active carotenoids, in combination with evaluation of potential direct health-beneficial (probiotic) activity of the Bacillus delivery vehicle, with the ultimate aim to improve biomarkers associated with (the prevention of) cardiovascular disease (CVD). The relevance of using carotenoids for CVD prevention was recently shown by a positive EFSA opinion on the use of tomato lycopene for maintenance of a healthy blood flow. In practice, effective delivery of the carotenoids to the human body will be compared upon administration as i) vegetative Bacillus cells, ii) Bacillus spores or iii) extracted carotenoids. In parallel, the ability of the Bacillus strain to exert bona fide effects (i.e., effects on the host microbiota, metabolism and immunity) will be investigated using in vitro gut models and in vivo rat studies. Based on this, the best delivery strategy will be selected and validated in a human study, in which carotenoid bioavailability will be validated as well as endpoints related to CVD biomarkers and potential probiotic activity. In combination with a full safety assessment, a proof-of-concept production strategy and development of a business plan, the scientific evidence compiled in this project will provide a framework for efficient further commercialisation of a well-documented Bacillus carotenoid product


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 5.28M | Year: 2013

The major bottleneck for plant biomass processing is fiber saccharification: the conversion of cell wall lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars (en route to production of value-added chemicals like second generation biofuels). Some microbes enhance this step by using natural self-assembling proteinaceous nanocatalists known as cellulosomes. CellulosomePlus targets rational design of optimized cellulosomes to overcome this problem.This would allow efficient production of biofuels from low-value raw materials like inedible parts of plants and industrial residues (which are all renewable, sustainable and inexpensive). First we propose to characterize the physicochemical and structural properties (including mechanostability) as well as interactions of enzymes and scaffolds from natural cellulosomes and non-cellulosomal components. In parallel, we will characterize a suitable residual substrate from municipal waste (organic fraction of municipal solid waste) and develop improved assays to reliably follow cellulosomal enzymatic activity. The acquired knowledge will be complemented with rapid computational modelling at the atomic and supramolecular levels for testing and predictions. Experimental and theoretical knowledge will be then integrated to design improved cellulosomes (with high-selectivity, activity and cost-effectiveness). Further improvement will be obtained by iteration using high throughput screening of components. The improved cellulosomes generated through this innovative multidisciplinary approach represent a step towards green chemistry since they are biodegradable proteinaceous materials and therefore by-products and/or wastes are minimized due to the high enzymatic selectivity. Finally, the production of the optimized cellulosomes (and the process involved) will be scaled up to preindustrial scale to demonstrate their viable commercial production. These results will be patented and a roadmap will be drawn up towards future standardization.


Patent
Biopolis S.L. and Complutense University of Madrid | Date: 2015-05-27

The invention relates to a method for producing 2,3-butanediol using improved strains of Raoultella planticola, and to novel mutant strains obtained by random mutagenesis from the bacterial species Raoultella planticola CECT843, that can be used in the industrial production of 2,3-butanediol from glycerol. The invention preferably relates to the Raoultella planticola strains designated IA1 and IIIA3 and deposited in the Spanish Type Culture Collection (CECT) under deposit number CECT8158 (corresponding to the strain designated IA1) and deposit number CECT8159 (corresponding to the strain designated IIIA3). The invention also relates to a method for producing 2,3-butanediol from glycerol by means of a biotechnological process using the novel strains of the invention.


The invention is applicable within the food and pharmaceutical industry. More specifically, it relates to a novel strain of the species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 8145, the cell components, metabolites and secreted molecules thereof, which, incorporated into food and/or pharmaceutical formulations, can be used in the treatment and/or prevention of excess weight and obesity and related diseases such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, glycemia, inflammation, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypercholesterolemia, hormonal alterations, infertility, etc.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BIOTEC-02-2016 | Award Amount: 6.43M | Year: 2017

Municipal solids waste (MSW) are collected by municipalities and represents more than 500 kg/capita (EU-27 average), 300 million tonnes overall every year in the EU-32. Currently, approximately 50% of this volume is landfilled. More than 1.3 million tonnes of Marine rest raw material (MRRM) are generated in Europe each year. Some countries, such as Norway and Denmark, have traditionally for animal feed. It will therefore be a challenge for the industry to develop methods to turn fish viscera and skin, currently considered as undesirable raw materials for hydrolysis and human consumption, into profitable products. DAFIA will exploit MSW and MRRM as feedstocks for high value products. The parallel exploitation of the two feedstocks may create synergies. This expertise will be utilised in process development from MSW, while at the same time, new added-value products may be identified from both feed stocks. The main objective of the DAFIA project is to explore the conversion routes of municipal solid waste (MSW), and marine rest raw-materials (MRRM) from the fish processing industries, to obtain high added value products, i.e. flame retardants, edible/barrier coatings and chemical building blocks (dicarboxylic acids and diamine) to produce polyamides and polyesters for a wide range industrial applications. Different value-chains and products will be selected and explored based on the potential commercial value and the technical feasibility including new microbial strains and processes for conversion of major feedstock fractions, enzymatic and chemical modifications of components isolated from the feedstock or produced in microbial processes. Up to four cost-effective molecule groups suitable for the final selected applications will be targeted (nucleic acids, dicarboxylic acids, diamines and gelatine), & two value-chains (MSW & MRRM) will be evaluated at pilot scale to reach TRL5.


The present invention relates to a strain of the species Caulobacter segnis with deposit number DSM29236, which having the capacity to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from lactose. Therefore, the present invention also contemplates the use of said strain for the production of PHA, and a method for producing PHA which comprises cultivating the said strain in aerobic conditions in presence of at least 10% oxygen saturation and wherein the culture medium comprises a solution of lactose, glucose and/or galactose, a phosphorus source and an inorganic nitrogen source.


The invention is applicable within the food and pharmaceutical industry. More specifically, it relates to a novel strain of the species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 8145, the cell components, metabolites and secreted molecules thereof, which, incorporated into food and/or pharmaceutical formulations, can be used in the treatment and/or prevention of excess weight and obesity and related diseases such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, glycemia, inflammation, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypercholesterolemia, hormonal alterations, infertility, etc.

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