Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory

Laboratory, Taiwan

Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory

Laboratory, Taiwan
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Jiang P.-S.,Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory | Drake P.,Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory | Cho H.-J.,Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory | Kao C.-H.,Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | Year: 2012

Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd 3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd 001Fe 0.99O 4 to Gd 0.04Fe 2.96O 4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12nm and 33nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg ?1 [Fe] for the Gd 0.03Fe 2.97O 4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe 3O 4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd 0.02Fe 0.98O 4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd 0.02Fe 0.98O 1 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.


PubMed | Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology | Year: 2012

Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment.

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