Biomedical Technologies Inc.

Denver, CO, United States

Biomedical Technologies Inc.

Denver, CO, United States
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Molinari F.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Zeng G.,Mayo Medical School | Suri J.S.,Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Suri J.S.,Idaho State University
IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control | Year: 2010

The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery is a widely used clinical marker of severe cardiovascular diseases. IMT is usually manually measured on longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. Many computer-based techniques for IMT measurement have been proposed to overcome the limits of manual segmentation. Most of these, however, require a certain degree of user interaction. In this paper we describe a new, completely automated layer extraction technique (named CALEXia) for the segmentation and IMT measurement of the carotid wall in ultrasound images. CALEXia is based on an integrated approach consisting of feature extraction, line fitting, and classification that enables the automated tracing of the carotid adventitial walls. IMT is then measured by relying on a fuzzy K-means classifier. We tested CALEXia on a database of 200 images. We compared CALEXia's performance with those of a previously developed methodology that was based on signal analysis (CULEXsa). Three trained operators manually segmented the images and the average profiles were considered as the ground truth. The average error from CALEXia for lumen-intima (LI) and media- adventitia (MA) interface tracings were 1.46 ± 1.51 pixel (0.091 ± 0.093 mm) and 0.40 ± 0.87 pixel (0.025 ± 0.055 mm), respectively. The corresponding errors for CULEXsa were 0.55 ± 0.51 pixels (0.035 ± 0.032 mm) and 0.59 ± 0.46 pixels (0.037 ± 0.029 mm). The IMT measurement error was equal to 0.87 ± 0.56 pixel (0.054 ± 0.035 mm) for CALEXia and 0.12 ± 0.14 pixel (0.01 ± 0.01 mm) for CULEXsa. Thus, CALEXia showed limited performance in segmenting the LI interface, but outperformed CULEXsa in the MA interface and in the number of images correctly processed (190 for CALEXia and 184 for CULEXsa). Based upon two complementary strategies, we anticipate fusing them for further IMT improvements. © 2010 IEEE.


Molinari F.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Zeng G.,Mayo Medical School | Suri J.S.,Idaho State University | Suri J.S.,Biomedical Technologies Inc.
Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine | Year: 2010

Last 10 years have witnessed the growth of many computer applications for the segmentation of the vessel wall in ultrasound imaging. Epidemiological studies showed that the thickness of the major arteries is an early and effective marker of onset of cardiovascular diseases. Ultrasound imaging, being real-time, economic, reliable, safe, and now seems to become a standard in vascular assessment methodology.This review is an attempt to discuss the most performing methodologies that have been developed so far to perform computer-based segmentation and intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement of the carotid arteries in ultrasound images. First we will present the rationale and the clinical relevance of computer-based measurements in clinical practice, followed by the challenges that one has to face when approaching the segmentation of ultrasound vascular images.The core of the paper is the presentation, discussion, benchmarking and evaluation of different segmentation techniques, including: edge-detection, active contours, dynamic programming, local statistics, Hough transform, statistical modeling, and integration of these approaches. Also, we will discuss and compare the different performance metrics that have been proposed and used to perform the validation. Best performing user-dependent techniques show an average IMT measurement error of about 1 μm when compared to human tracings [57], whereas completely automated techniques show errors of about 10 μm.The review ends with a discussion about the current standards in carotid wall segmentation and in an overview of the future perspectives, which may include the adoption of advanced and intelligent strategies to let the computer technique measure the IMT in the image portion where measurement is more reliable. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Molinari F.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Zeng G.,Clemson University | Suri J.S.,Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Suri J.S.,Idaho State University
Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine | Year: 2010

Objective. Most of the algorithms for the segmentation of the common carotid artery (CCA) wall require human interaction to locate the vessel in the ultrasound image. The aim of this article is to show an accurate algorithm for the computer-based automated tracing of the CCA in longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images. Methods. Two hundred images (100 normal CCAs, 50 CCAs with an increased intima-media thickness, 30 with fibrous plaques, and 20 with anechoic plaques) were processed to delineate the region of interest containing the CCA. The strategy is an integrated approach (carotid artery layer extraction using an integrated approach [CALEXia]) consisting of geometric feature extraction, line fitting, and classification. The output of the algorithm is the tracings of the proximal and distal adventitia layers. Performance of the algorithm was validated against human tracings considered the ground truth. Results. The mean distance errors ± SD using this integrated approach were 1.05 ± 1.04 pixels (0.07 ± 0.07 mm) for proximal or near adventitia and 2.68 ± 3.94 pixels (0.17 ± 0.24 mm) for distal or far adventitia. Sixteen of 200 images were not perfectly traced because of the presence of both plaques and blood backscattering. The computational cost ensures the possibility for near real-time detection. Conclusions. Although the CALEXia algorithm automatically detects the CCA, it is also robust and validated over a large database. This can constitute a general basis for a completely automated segmentation procedure widely applicable to other anatomies. © 2010 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.


Patent
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2014-03-25

A method of controlling an ultrasonic motor coupled to a motor driver circuit, comprises receiving a temperature signal representing the temperature of the ultrasonic motor, receiving a position signal output by a first encoder representing the position of the ultrasonic motor, calculating an error between the position of the ultrasonic motor represented by the position signal and a target position, calculating a control signal based on the temperature of the ultrasonic motor represented by the temperature signal and the calculated error, and sending the control signal to the motor driver circuit to control the ultrasonic motor.


Trademark
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2013-01-08

Computer programs for use in medical image analysis, diagnosis, and treatment, namely, software for processing digital images of the anatomy for analysis, diagnosis and treatment, and software for processing digital images of the anatomy to add additional visual elements to the digital images for enhanced analysis, diagnosis and treatment; computer software for creating searchable medical diagnosis and treatment databases; computer software for enabling access to searchable medical diagnosis and treatment databases via a global data network.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will establish an aquaculture facility to breed and maintain laboratory reared populations of cephalopods. Marine Biomedical Technologies (MBT) is uniquely prepared to overcome the obstacles involved in successfully raising large laboratory populations of healthy cephalopods, and make these animals available to researchers and educators. The specific objectives are to establish laboratory breeding colonies of three species of cuttlefish and one species of squid, evaluate the effectiveness of visual cues placed in breeding tanks to induce early reproductive behavior in cuttlefish and squid, and to investigate the effects of an administered hormone precursor supplement on fecundity, individual growth, and mating frequency of cuttlefish and squid.

The broader/commercial impacts of this research are to create the availability of a critical resource to ensure that research involving cephalopods can be conducted, can be accomplished faster, at less cost, with greater reliability, and to the direct benefit of society. In conjunction with Colleges and Universities, MBT will provide a fertile training ground to educate state-of-the art environmental scientists that will have a working knowledge of alternative model species, their husbandry, and the bench methods necessary to address environmental health questions through the application of such models. Finally, establishing a facility to breed and maintain captive stocks of cephalopods will result in a reduction of harvested animals from the natural environment. This will directly help in maintaining the stability and health of the marine ecosystem.


Trademark
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2012-07-10

Computer programs for use in medical image analysis, diagnosis, and treatment, namely, software for processing digital images of the anatomy for analysis, diagnosis and treatment, and software for processing digital images of the anatomy to add additional visual elements to the digital images for enhanced analysis, diagnosis and treatment; computer software for creating searchable medical diagnosis and treatment databases.


Trademark
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2012-10-30

Personal health device, namely, a generator of gaseous water molecules for heating and hydrating mammalian airways.


Trademark
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2012-04-10

Computer programs for use in medical image analysis, diagnosis, and treatment, namely, software for processing digital images of the anatomy for analysis, diagnosis and treatment, and software for processing digital images of the anatomy to add additional visual elements to the digital images for enhanced analysis, diagnosis and treatment; computer software for creating searchable medical diagnosis and treatment databases.


Trademark
Biomedical Technologies Inc. | Date: 2012-07-24

Computer programs for use in medical image analysis, diagnosis, and treatment, namely, software for processing digital images of the anatomy for analysis, diagnosis and treatment, and software for processing digital images of the anatomy to add additional visual elements to the digital images for enhanced analysis, diagnosis and treatment; computer software for creating searchable medical diagnosis and treatment databases.

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