Biomedical Research & Analysis Laboratory

Jacksonville, FL, United States

Biomedical Research & Analysis Laboratory

Jacksonville, FL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Maser R.E.,University of Delaware | Maser R.E.,Diabetes and Metabolic Research Center | James Lenhard M.,Diabetes and Metabolic Research Center | James Lenhard M.,Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Center | And 2 more authors.
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2017

Osteopontin (OPN) and clusterin are secreted glycoproteins potentially associated with nerve function. Sudomotor dysfunction is associated with the development of foot ulcerations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential relationship of OPN and clusterin with sudomotor function (i.e., autonomic nerves that control sweating) in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sudomotor function was assessed using SUDOSCAN® which measures electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of the hands and feet. Demographics (e.g., age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI)), HbA1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, creatinine, OPN, and clusterin were also determined for the participants. Fifty individuals with T2DM (age = 59±11 years; 23/27 male/female; 13 African Americans) participated in this study. Lower ESC for the hands and feet were observed in African Americans versus Caucasians/Asians (p < 0.05). No significant ESC differences were observed for good [HbA1c <7%] versus poor [HbA1c ≥7%] glycemic control. With regard to gender, ESC values were lower for the hands for females (p < 0.05). In linear regression with ESC for the hands or feet as the dependent variable, increased OPN levels, but not clusterin, were independently associated with reduced sudomotor function while adjusting for age, gender, race, BMI, and glycemic control (ESC hands model R2 = 0.504, p < 0.001; ESC feet model R2 = 0.534, p < 0.001). The association between OPN and reduced sudomotor function found in our study warrants further investigation to delineate the underlying mechanisms and determine if OPN is neuroprotective, involved in the pathogenesis of sudomotor dysfunction, or simply a bystander. © 2017 Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l.


PubMed | University of Delaware, Biomedical Research & Analysis Laboratory and Diabetes and Metabolic Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of diabetes and its complications | Year: 2016

Osteopontin (OPN) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) are bone metabolism biomarkers potentially associated with nerve function. We evaluated the association of cardiovascular autonomic nerve function, OPN, and OPG in 50 individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).RR-variation during deep breathing (i.e., mean circular resultant (MCR) and expiration/inspiration (E/I) ratio) was used to assess parasympathetic nerve function. Participants demographics, HbA1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), BMI, HOMA-IR, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine, OPN, and OPG were determined.Using stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with MCR or E/I ratio as the dependent variable, OPN was independently associated with reduced autonomic function. A previous report showed a significant association of cardiovascular autonomic function with age, 25(OH)D insufficiency, and the interaction of age25(OH)D insufficiency. Here we report a novel association for OPN and its interaction with age indicating that for those who are younger, elevated OPN levels are related to a greater loss of autonomic function (MCR model R2=0.598, p<0.001; E/I model R2=0.594, p<0.001).Our results suggest that OPN is associated with reduced parasympathetic function, particularly in younger individuals with T2DM. Further studies are needed to determine if OPN is neuroprotective, involved in the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, or a bystander.

Loading Biomedical Research & Analysis Laboratory collaborators
Loading Biomedical Research & Analysis Laboratory collaborators