Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation

Baton Rouge, LA, United States

Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation

Baton Rouge, LA, United States
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Silva A.M.,University of Lisbon | Fields D.A.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Heymsfield S.B.,Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation | Sardinha L.B.,University of Lisbon
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2011

Silva, AM, Fields, DA, Heymsfield, SB, and Sardinha, LB. Relationship between changes in total-body water and fluid distribution with maximal forearm strength in elite judo athletes. J Strength Cond Res 25(9): 2488-2495, 2011-Among judo athletes, strong grip strength is crucial for performing offensive and defensive maneuvers that rely predominantly on forearm maximal strength (FMS). The study aims were to evaluate changes in total-body water (TBW) and its compartments (extracellular water [ECW] and intracellular water [ICW]) and their relationship with loss of FMS in elite judo athletes. At baseline (weight stability), 27 male elite athletes were evaluated (age: 23.2 ± 2.8 years) and again evaluated 1-3 days before competition. Athletes were free to gain or lose weight based upon their specific competition needs. Using dilution techniques (deuterium and bromide), TBW and ECW were estimated, and ICW was calculated (ICW = TBW 2 ECW). Fat, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue (LST) were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Handgrip was used to assess FMS. Using a reduction of 2% as a representative outcome for decreased FMS, 10 athletes were identified as having lost FMS, whereas 17 changed <2% or gained. Comparison of means and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results from baseline to before competition indicated that those who lost ≥2% of FMS significantly decreased TBW and ICW by 22.7 ± 3.0 and 24.4 ± 4.2%, respectively. The groups differed in ICW changes (24.4 ± 4.2 vs. 1.9 ± 6.1%), respectively, for those who lost FMS by ≥2%. The ICW changes, but not in TBW or ECW, significantly predicted the risk of losing FMS (β = 0.206; p = 0.027), even adjusting for weight and arm LST changes. These findings indicated that reductions in ICW increased the risk of losing grip strength in elite judo athletes. © 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Greenway F.L.,Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation
Obesity Surgery | Year: 2011

Background: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining acceptance among bariatric surgeons as a viable option for treating morbidly obese patients. We describe results of a single surgeon's experience with LSG in a community practice revealing a low complication rate and describing the surgical technique. Methods: LSG was performed in 529 consecutive patients from December 2006 to March 2010. A technique is described where all operations were performed with attention to avoiding strictures at the incisura angularis and stapling close to the esophagus at the angle of His. No operations performed used buttressing material or over-sewing of the staple line. A retrospective chart review and e-mail survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of complications and weight loss. Results: Follow-up data was collected on 490 of the 529 (92.6%) patients at 6 weeks. A total complication rate of 3.2% and a 1.7% 30-day readmission rate were observed. No leaks occurred in any of the 529 patients, and one death (0.19%) was observed. The most common complications were nausea and vomiting with dehydration and venous thrombosis. The percentages of excess weight loss were 42.36, 65.92, 66.11, and 64.42 with a follow-up of 71%, 68%, 63%, and 49% at 6 months, 1 year, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Conclusion: The LSG can be performed in a community practice with a low complication rate. Surgeons performing LSG should strive to minimize the risk of creating strictures at the incisura angularis and stapling near the esophagus at the angle of His. © 2010 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.

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