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Mostafalu P.,Tufts University | Amugothu S.,Carnegie Mellon University | Tamayol A.,Biomaterials Innovation Research Center | Bagherifard S.,Biomaterials Innovation Research Center | And 4 more authors.
IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference: Engineering for Healthy Minds and Able Bodies, BioCAS 2015 - Proceedings | Year: 2015

Topical drug delivery is a preferred choice to improve the healing process of the chronic wound. However, one of the challenge in topical drug delivery is to find a feasible method to control the drug release in real-Time. To achieve this goal, we created a localized smart flexible bandage containing thermo-responsive drug loaded microparticles encapsulated inside a hydrogel. A flexible heater is in contact with the hydrogel patch. A series of off-The-shelf electronics components including driver of the heater, microcontroller, a wireless radios are assembled in a compact package, and used to control the heater and drug release wirelessly. Paper presents the design and experimental results. © 2015 IEEE.


News Article | March 18, 2016
Site: phys.org

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed hardware and software to remotely monitor and control devices that mimic the human physiological system. Devices known as organs-on-chips allow researchers to test drug compounds and predict physiological responses with high accuracy in a laboratory setting. But monitoring the results of such experiments from a conventional desktop computer has several limitations, especially when results must be monitored over the course of hours, days or even weeks. Google Glass, one of the newest forms of wearable technology, offers researchers a hands-free and flexible monitoring system. To make Google Glass work for their purposes, Zhang et al. custom developed hardware and software that takes advantage of voice control command ("ok glass") and other features in order to not only monitor but also remotely control their liver- and heart-on-a-chip systems. Using valves remotely activated by the Glass, the team introduced pharmaceutical compounds on liver organoids and collected the results. Their results appear this week in Scientific Reports. "We believe such a platform has widespread applications in biomedicine, and may be further expanded to health care settings where remote monitoring and control could make things safer and more efficient," said senior author Ali Khademhosseini, PhD, Director of the Biomaterials Innovation Research Center at BWH. "This may be of particular importance in cases where experimental conditions threaten human life - such as work involving highly pathogenic bacteria or viruses or radioactive compounds," said leading author, Shrike Zhang, PhD, also of BWH's Biomedical Division. Explore further: Researchers use synthetic silicate to stimulate stem cells into bone cells More information: Yu Shrike Zhang et al. Google Glass-Directed Monitoring and Control of Microfluidic Biosensors and Actuators, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep22237


News Article | March 22, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Brigham and Women's Hospital investigators have developed hardware and software to remotely monitor and control devices that mimic the human physiological system. Devices known as organs-on-chips allow researchers to test drug compounds and predict physiological responses with high accuracy in a laboratory setting. But monitoring the results of such experiments from a conventional desktop computer has several limitations, especially when results must be monitored over the course of hours, days or even weeks. Google Glass, one of the newest forms of wearable technology, offers researchers a hands-free and flexible monitoring system. To make Google Glass work for their purposes, Zhang et al. custom developed hardware and software that takes advantage of voice control command (“ok glass”) and other features in order to not only monitor but also remotely control their liver- and heart-on-a-chip systems. Using valves remotely activated by the Glass, the team introduced pharmaceutical compounds on liver organoids and collected the results. Their results appear in Scientific Reports. “We believe such a platform has widespread applications in biomedicine, and may be further expanded to health care settings where remote monitoring and control could make things safer and more efficient,” said senior author Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D., Director of the Biomaterials Innovation Research Center at BWH. “This may be of particular importance in cases where experimental conditions threaten human life—such as work involving highly pathogenic bacteria or viruses or radioactive compounds,” said leading author, Shrike Zhang, PhD, also of BWH’s Biomedical Division. Citation: Zhang et al. “Google Glass-Directed Monitoring and Control of Microfluidic Biosensors and Actuators” Scientific Reports DOI: 10.1038/srep22237


News Article | March 16, 2016
Site: phys.org

An image of a calcified human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque using density-dependent color scanning electron microscopy (DDC-SEM) Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and MIT have combined an innovative microscopy technique with a methodology for building inexpensive mini-microscopes, allowing them to capture images at a resolution that, until now, has only been possible with benchtop microscopes that are orders of magnitude higher in cost. Details about the hybrid technique, known as Expansion Mini-Microscopy (ExMM), are published this week in Scientific Reports. The new work takes advantage of an expansion microscopy method recently developed by a group led by Edward Boyden, PhD, of the MIT Media Lab and McGovern Institute, and colleagues that uses a swellable gel to physically grow a specimen up to approximately 4.5 times its original dimensions. Bioengineers from BWH led by Ali Khademhosseini, PhD, director of the Biomaterials Innovation Research Center have recently built mini-microscopes from a webcam and off-the-shelf components, including fluorescence capacity with adjustable magnifications that cost as low as a few to a few tens of dollars per piece. However, the resolution of the images available using these mini-microscopes has been limited. Now, by integrating this approach with physical expansion of the samples, researchers have achieved a resolution comparable to the resolution previously attainable only by conventional benchtop microscopes. As a proof of concept, the team put ExMM to the test by magnifying bacteria. They see wide-ranging applications for their technique, including use in developing countries for point-of-care diagnosis. "We anticipate that our ExMM technology is likely to find widespread applications in low-cost, high-resolution imaging of biological and medical samples, potentially replacing the benchtop microscope in many cases where portability is a priority, such as in research and health care scenarios in undeveloped countries or remote places," said Khademhosseini. "The beauty of the ExMM technology lies in its simplicity—by combining physical and optical magnifications, high performance is achievable at a low cost. It's a 'best of both worlds' technology, in a way, utilizing the best features of inexpensive chemicals and inexpensive optics," said Boyden. "The further advancement of the technology, through the development of cheap and simple ExMM detection kits and the algorithms associated with imaging processing, will allow streamlined sample preparation, imaging and analysis," said co-first author, Shrike Zhang, PhD, of BWH's Biomedical Division. Jae-Byum Chang, PhD, of the Boyden lab at MIT is also a co-first author of the study. Explore further: Team enlarges brain samples, making them easier to image More information: Yu Shrike Zhang et al. Hybrid Microscopy: Enabling Inexpensive High-Performance Imaging through Combined Physical and Optical Magnifications, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep22691

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