Porto Alegre, Brazil
Porto Alegre, Brazil

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Chao Y.-K.,Chang Gung Memorial Hospital | Liu K.-S.,Chang Gung Memorial Hospital | Liu K.-S.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Wang Y.-C.,Chang Gung University | And 2 more authors.
Chest | Year: 2013

Background: Self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) are effective in the palliation of malignant airway obstruction. Tumor ingrowth, however, frequently occurs because of a shortage of effective local therapy. Additionally, SEMSs are frequently associated with problems of fracture, migration, and difficult removals. Our goal was to develop a novel bioabsorbable stent with cisplatin elution to circumvent such problems. Methods: Biodegradable stents made of polycaprolactone were fabricated by a laboratory-made, microinjection molding machine. In vitro mechanical strength of the stents was compared with the strength of Ultraflex SEMSs. Polylactide-polyglycolide copolymer and cisplatin were coated onto the surfaces of the stents. Elution method and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used to examine the in vitro cisplatin release characteristics. In vivo, the stents were surgically implanted into the cervical trachea of 15 New Zealand white rabbits. Bronchoscopic examination was performed weekly (1 to approximately 5 weeks) before killing. Cisplatin concentrations in trachea, lung, and blood were analyzed by HPLC. Histologic examination was also performed. Results: The biodegradable stent exhibited mechanical strength comparable to the strength of Ultraflex SEMSs and provided a steady release of cisplatin for > 4 weeks in vitro. The in vivo study showed sustained cisplatin levels in rabbit trachea for > 5 weeks with a minimum drug level in blood. Histologic examination showed an intact ciliated epithelium and marked leukocyte infiltration in the submucosa of the stented area. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the biodegradable stents provided physical properties comparable to the properties of SEMSs and a sustained release of cisplatin for > 5 weeks, which showed great potential in the treatment of malignant airway obstruction. © 2013 American College of Chest Physicians.


Domingues J.A.,University of Campinas | Cherutti G.,University of Campinas | Motta A.C.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Hausen M.A.,Federal University of São Carlos | And 5 more authors.
Artificial Organs | Year: 2016

Several materials are commercially available as substitutes for skin. However, new strategies are needed to improve the treatment of skin wounds. In this study, we developed and characterized a new device consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and collagen associated with mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue. To develop the bilaminar device, we initially obtained a membrane of PLGA by dissolving the copolymer in chloroform and then produced a collagen type I scaffold by freeze-drying. The materials were characterized physically by gel permeation chromatography, scanning electron microscopy, and mass loss. Biological activity was assessed by cell proliferation assay. A preliminary study in vivo was performed with a pig model in which tissue regeneration was assessed macroscopically and histologically, the commercial device Integra being used as a control. The PLGA/collagen bilaminar material was porous, hydrolytically degradable, and compatible with skin growth. The polymer complex allowed cell adhesion and proliferation, making it a potentially useful cell carrier. In addition, the transparency of the material allowed monitoring of the lesion when the dressings were changed. Xenogeneic mesenchymal cells cultured on the device (PLGA/collagen/ASC) showed a reduced granulomatous reaction to bovine collagen, down-regulation of α-SMA, enhancement in the number of neoformed blood vessels, and collagen organization as compared with normal skin; the device was superior to other materials tested (PLGA/collagen and Integra) in its ability to stimulate the formation of new cutaneous tissue. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Federal University of São Carlos, Biomaterials Laboratory and University of Campinas
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Artificial organs | Year: 2016

Several materials are commercially available as substitutes for skin. However, new strategies are needed to improve the treatment of skin wounds. In this study, we developed and characterized a new device consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and collagen associated with mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue. To develop the bilaminar device, we initially obtained a membrane of PLGA by dissolving the copolymer in chloroform and then produced a collagen type I scaffold by freeze-drying. The materials were characterized physically by gel permeation chromatography, scanning electron microscopy, and mass loss. Biological activity was assessed by cell proliferation assay. A preliminary study in vivo was performed with a pig model in which tissue regeneration was assessed macroscopically and histologically, the commercial device Integra being used as a control. The PLGA/collagen bilaminar material was porous, hydrolytically degradable, and compatible with skin growth. The polymer complex allowed cell adhesion and proliferation, making it a potentially useful cell carrier. In addition, the transparency of the material allowed monitoring of the lesion when the dressings were changed. Xenogeneic mesenchymal cells cultured on the device (PLGA/collagen/ASC) showed a reduced granulomatous reaction to bovine collagen, down-regulation of -SMA, enhancement in the number of neoformed blood vessels, and collagen organization as compared with normal skin; the device was superior to other materials tested (PLGA/collagen and Integra) in its ability to stimulate the formation of new cutaneous tissue.


Ribeiro G.B.M.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Trommer R.M.,Ceramic Materials Laboratory | Dos Santos L.A.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Bergmann C.P.,Ceramic Materials Laboratory
Materials Letters | Year: 2011

The production of ceramic scaffolds by a novel method was reported in this work. The method comprised the mixture of colloidal silica and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) powder, where paraffin microspheres were further added to provide the porosity in the scaffold after firing. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed that the paraffin was completely degraded before 550 °C, where the heat treatment at 1100 °C was enough to remove the paraffin and provide porosity and mechanical strength. The scaffold had an open porosity, but with poor pore interconnection. The density of the scaffold was 1.11±0.03 g/cm 3 with a porosity of 64.98±1.1%, and the compression strength was 5.02±1.2 MPa. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Jung W.S.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Kang J.H.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Chu H.S.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Choi I.S.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Cho K.M.,Biomaterials Laboratory
Metabolic Engineering | Year: 2014

3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is a renewable-based platform chemical which may be used to produce a wide range of chemicals including acrylic acid, 1,3-propanediol, and acrylamide. Commercialization of microbial 3-HP production from glycerol, which is produced inexpensively as a by-product of biodiesel production, could be expedited when global biodiesel production increases significantly. For enhancing 3-HP production, this study aimed to investigate metabolic engineering strategies towards eliminating by-products of 3-HP as well as optimizing the glycerol metabolism. The removal of genes involved in the generation of major by-products of 3-HP including acetate and 1,3-propanediol increased both 3-HP production level (28.1. g/L) and its average yield (0.217. g/g). Optimization of l-arabinose inducible expression of glycerol kinase GlpK, which catalyzes the conversion of glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate, was also made to increase the metabolic flow from glycerol to 3-HP. To activate the whole glycerol metabolism towards 3-HP, the regulatory factor repressing the utilization of glycerol in Escherichia coli, encoded by glpR was eliminated by knocking-out in its chromosomal DNA. The resulting strain showed a significant improvement in the glycerol utilization rate as well as 3-HP titer (40.5. g/L). The transcriptional analysis of glpR deletion mutant revealed the poor expression of glycerol facilitator GlpF, which is involved in glycerol transport in the cell. Additional expression of glpF in the glpR deletion mutant successfully led to an increase in 3-HP production (42.1. g/L) and an average yield (0.268. g/g). © 2014.


Kohan N.J.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Via B.K.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Via B.K.,Auburn University | Taylor S.E.,Auburn University
BioResources | Year: 2012

Wood strands either prepared in the laboratory or from a manufacturing plant were assessed for their ultimate tensile strength, tensile MOE, bending strength, and bending stiffness, and then near infrared spectroscopy was utilized for prediction. The ability to predict ultimate tensile strength and stiffness was generally weaker than bending strength and stiffness, perhaps due to the homogeneous distribution of stresses that occur within the strand during 3-point bending. Prediction of ultimate tensile strength and elasticity of plant based strands were generally weak due to imperfections in the strands that originate during biomass breakdown; however, for laboratory strands, prediction of tensile strength and stiffness was moderate/better. The modulus of elasticity for strands under bending exhibited the strongest correlation (R2 = 0.76). Principal component loadings were assessed, and it was found that the cellulose crystalline- and semi-crystalline-associated wavelengths were most important in predicting the stiffness for both tensile and bending forces; however, the influence of lignin-associated wavelengths increased in importance when predicting bending strength, and it was hypothesized that this was attributable to the plastic response of lignin above the proportional limit in the stress-to-strain curve. This study demonstrates the potential of near infrared spectroscopy to monitor the biomass quality prior to composite manufacture.


Elias C.N.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Fernandes D.J.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Resende C.R.S.,Biomaterials Laboratory | Roestel J.,Conexao Sistemas de Protese
Dental Materials | Year: 2015

Objective Commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V (Ti G5) alloy have limitations for biomedical application, due to lower mechanical strength and the possibility of ion release, respectively. The purpose of this work was to compare the properties of a modified cp Ti grade 4 (Ti G4 Hard) with those of available cp Ti and Ti G5 alloys. Methods Bars, discs and dental implants made with Ti G2, G4, G5 and G4 Hard were used. Mechanical tests (tension, compression, hardness and torque) and roughness measurements were performed. Clinical trials were used to evaluate the biological behavior of dental implants made with Ti G4 Hard and Ti G4. Results The results of the mechanical tests showed that the mechanical strength of modified Ti G4 is higher than that of Ti G2, G4 and G5. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that modified Ti G4 after etching has better surface morphological features than conventional cp Ti and Ti G5. The clinical performances of Ti G4 and Ti G4 Hard were similar. Significance The improvement of the mechanical properties of modified Ti G4 means that Ti G5 can be safely replaced by Ti G4 Hard without compromising the fracture resistance, with the advantage of not releasing toxic ions. © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Conexao Sistemas de Protese and Biomaterials Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Dental materials : official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials | Year: 2015

Commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V (Ti G5) alloy have limitations for biomedical application, due to lower mechanical strength and the possibility of ion release, respectively. The purpose of this work was to compare the properties of a modified cp Ti grade 4 (Ti G4 Hard) with those of available cp Ti and Ti G5 alloys.Bars, discs and dental implants made with Ti G2, G4, G5 and G4 Hard were used. Mechanical tests (tension, compression, hardness and torque) and roughness measurements were performed. Clinical trials were used to evaluate the biological behavior of dental implants made with Ti G4 Hard and Ti G4.The results of the mechanical tests showed that the mechanical strength of modified Ti G4 is higher than that of Ti G2, G4 and G5. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that modified Ti G4 after etching has better surface morphological features than conventional cp Ti and Ti G5. The clinical performances of Ti G4 and Ti G4 Hard were similar.The improvement of the mechanical properties of modified Ti G4 means that Ti G5 can be safely replaced by Ti G4 Hard without compromising the fracture resistance, with the advantage of not releasing toxic ions.

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