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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

Overviews of the use of cleanerfish in Scotland, Norway, Iceland, the Faroes and Ireland made for a fascinating first afternoon of the inaugural International Cleaner Fish Summit, which kicked off in Glasgow today (May 8th). The first day consisted of a national overview of the developments in cleanerfish deployment by a key player from each of the five countries represented. While each representative gave their own unique perspective – based on their own experiences and the factors governing their relevant nations – a number of common themes emerged. One was the importance of ensuring that those working at sites containing cleanerfish were supportive of the idea. Cleanerfish can cause a great deal of extra work for site staff, but “as soon as they see the cleanerfish are working the site managers are hooked,” reflected Chris Hempleman from Scottish Sea Farms, who spoke about how the industry was evolving in Scotland. Another was the need to only use farmed cleanerfish in the long run. In Ireland, where cleanerfish have only been deployed since late 2015, all the wrasse used by the country’s largest producer are still wild-caught, but 100% of the lumpsuckers are now farmed. Elsewhere, the trend also seems to be moving in the right direction – in Scotland companies such as Scottish Sea Farms “now have the confidence and the capacity to stock purely farmed wrasse at some sites,” Chris Hempleman reflected. Meanwhile, in Norway, 57% of the 26.4 million cleanerfish (wrasse and lumpsuckers) deployed in 2015 were farmed, up from 16% of the 16.2 million cleanerfish deployed in 2013, according to Olav Breck, from Marine Harvest Norway. “We need to move towards using entirely farmed, vaccinated cleanerfish,” he argued. A third theme was the need for more cleanerfish to be produced. Every year Norway alone requires over 40 million cleanerfish to cope with the 400 million smolts stocked annually, according to Olav Breck. “It’s all about numbers, no company has enough cleanerfish at the moment,” added Chris Hempleman. Looking ahead, the need to improve survival rates of cleanerfish was seen as a further goal – not only by improving husbandry techniques, feeds and vaccines for cleanerfish species but also, in the longer run, by the development of selective breeding programmes. “Give us 15 years – ie five generations of cleanerfish – to bring down the mortality rate. It’s a new species and will take time,” argued Dr Jonas Jonasson, CEO of StofnFiskur, who spoke about cleanerfish production in Iceland. "But the key is to have a plan in place to demonstrate that they’re improving,” he added. Other challenges discussed were unique to individual countries – Ireland hasn’t had access to any licenced cleanerfish vaccines since 2015 revealed Sandra Schlittenhardt of Marine Harvest; while legislation in the Faroes means that they have no domestic cleanerfish farms in operation, but instead need to import all their lumpfish from producers in Iceland, such as StofnFiskur, explained Kirstin Eliasen of Fiskaaling. The event is taking place at the Technology & Innovation Centre, and is co-hosted by the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC) in partnership with the Norwegian Seafood Research Fund (FHF). Reflecting on the event, Heather Jones, CEO of SAIC, said: “Greater sea lice control has been one of our priorities since day one, as has sharing the insights gleaned from SAIC-supported projects with the wider Scottish aquaculture sector. So to see our industry and academic partners exchange the knowledge being gained with their industry and international peers is a truly landmark moment.” A range of partners from participating countries – including gold partners Scottish Sea Farms; silver partners BioMar and StofnFiskur; and bronze partners AquaGen, EWOS, HiddenFjord, Patogen and Skretting – helped to make the not-for-profit event possible. Meanwhile, exhibitors include Aquality, JETE Innovation, OK Marine, Pacific Trading and Skjerneset fisk AS.


LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio has announced the top five leading vendors in their recent global aquatic feed ingredients and products market report. This research report also lists 43 other prominent vendors that are expected to impact the market during the forecast period. The growth momentum of the global aquatic feed ingredients and products market is expected to accelerate at a CAGR of over 11% during the forecast period. The robust growth of the global aquaculture market is mainly attributed to the rising global population and the decline of the captured fish industry. Globalization has provided a favorable environment for the growth of the aquaculture market with the improvement of logistics systems and trade facilitation. The growth of the retail sector is also driving the market. While the aquatic feed products market in developed countries and some developing countries such as China and Brazil is at a relatively mature stage, there is ample space for manufacturers to explore the potential markets in APAC. “With an expanding target population base and a relative awareness of aquatic feed products, the markets in fast-growing countries such as China, India, Malaysia, and Indonesia and relatively matured markets such as Japan and South Korea in APAC present a considerable growth opportunity for players,” says Poonam Saini, a lead retail goods and services research analyst from Technavio. Looking for more information on this market? Request a free sample report Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report including the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more. ADDCON claims to be the leader in the aquaculture and fisheries industry and offers organic acids and salts to promote the growth of fishes. The company specializes in stabilizing and preserving agents for fishes. ADDCON offers a wide range of products that improve storage facilities in an economical way. Alltech develops and commercializes natural supplements for the food and feed industry. It offers natural products, technical information, and solutions to producers for agronomic and horticultural issues. It also produces spirits and beers; and provides education services, including graduate development programs for students. BioMar Group operates in the aquaculture industry. Its business segment comprises feed products for salmon and trout species in Norway, the UK, and Chile. The company offers feed materials for trout, eel, sea bass, and sea bream in Europe and feed for shrimp and tilapia fish species for South and Central America. Cargill offers food, agriculture, financial, and industrial products and services worldwide. After acquiring EWOS in October 2015, Cargill has become one of the largest global suppliers of aquatic feed, with 38 specialized production facilities and more than 2,000 employees in 20 countries. Cargill, through its products, promotes productivity, manages risks, and supports its customers' brand image. Cermaq is an international fish farming group and a provider of salmonid species. It is involved in the breeding, on-growing, processing, sale, and distribution of salmon. The company mills salmon and trout food in Norway, the UK, Canada, and Chile, and raises fish in the UK, Canada, and Chile. Become a Technavio Insights member and access all three of these reports for a fraction of their original cost. As a Technavio Insights member, you will have immediate access to new reports as they’re published in addition to all 6,000+ existing reports covering segments like luggage, retail systems, and pet supplies. This subscription nets you thousands in savings, while staying connected to Technavio’s constant transforming research library, helping you make informed business decisions more efficiently. Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, re-sellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.fishupdate.com

DANISH feed group BioMar is launching a high performing range for tilapia and African catfish, increasing its presence in the African market. The continent has huge demands for more food, which could be partly fulfilled by aquaculture, said BioMar’s Ole Christensen. ‘BioMar Group has ambitious targets and initiatives for shaping an efficient and sustainable global aquaculture in collaboration with the entire aquaculture value chain.’ African catfish and tilapia farming has increased in recent years, and BioMar has served this market from France with starter and grower diets. Now, as farms become increasingly intensive, BioMar is targeting broodstock diets, with a new feed range aimed at all tilapia and catfish farmers in Africa. The company has drawn on expertise from its global R&D, in collaboration with its unit in Costa Rica – where tilapia is also popular – to develop its new feeds. ‘The goal of broodstock feed EFICO Genio 838F is to increase reproduction capacity,’ said Michel Autin, technical director of BioMar EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa). ‘The vitamin mix and levels are fine tuned to promote an increase in the number of females actively spawning. ‘Our newly developed broodstock feed has a formulation that includes the necessary protein and vitamin balances, which contributes to increased spawning frequency, hatchability, and survival of fry.’ The EFICO Genio 838F includes the probiotic Bactocell and immune modulating ingredients similar to BioMar’s EFICO Genio broodstock feeds for trout, sea bass and sea bream to improve survival and boost the immune system. ‘These efforts have been of great value to the development of the feeds offered by BioMar for warm freshwater fish like tilapia and African catfish,’ said Autin. ‘And now we can, for the first time, provide a broodstock diet that is specialised for warm freshwater fish whose natural diet is largely plant based.’ African aquaculture production is expanding in various ways and into various species, and the markets served by BioMar are not limited to tilapia and catfish. ‘We have for many years also supplied feed to a growing number of sea bass and sea bream farms based in Northern African countries,’ said Ole Christensen. ‘We aim to add value to African aquaculture production.’


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

A new range of high performance tilapia and African catfish feeds has been launched BioMar – a sign of the growing importance and sophistication of the aquaculture sector in Africa. Africa is a continent with huge demands for more food, produced in a responsible and sustainable way. “We believe that aquaculture is one of the answers to this demand”, said Ole Christensen, Vice President for BioMar’s EMEA division. “BioMar Group has ambitious targets and initiatives for shaping an efficient and sustainable global aquaculture in collaboration with the entire aquaculture value chain.” In recent years, the growth of African catfish and tilapia farming has increased, particularly in the African markets. As farms become increasingly intensive, the need for a diet targeted for broodstock has grown. To meet this demand, BioMar France is now expanding its product range to cover all nutritional needs of these species at all stages of their life cycle by introducing broodstock feed type EFICO Genio 838F, available for all tilapia and African catfish farmers in Africa and other markets served by BioMar’s EMEA division. As in Africa, tilapia is also a popular aquaculture species in Central America. Cross-utilising knowledge and expertise in aquafeed across borders and continents is one of BioMar’s important strengths, and it was central in developing BioMar’s feed range for tilapia. Global R&D at BioMar has in close collaboration with our unit in Costa Rica carried out research on this species and developed high value feed types, which have been fine-tuned by working in close collaboration with an intensive tilapia farm. “The goal of broodstock feed EFICO Genio 838F is to increase reproduction capacity,” said Michel Autin, Technical Director of BioMar EMEA. “The vitamin mix and levels are fine-tuned to promote an increase in the number of females actively spawning. Our newly developed broodstock feed has a formulation that includes the necessary protein and vitamin balances, which contributes to increased spawning frequency, hatchability, and survival of fry.” The EFICO Genio 838F includes the probiotic Bactocell and immune modulating ingredients similar to BioMar’s EFICO Genio broodstock feeds for trout, sea bass and sea bream to improve survival and boost the immune system. “These efforts have been of great value to the development of the feeds offered by BioMar for warm freshwater fish like tilapia and African catfish,” said Michel Autin. “And now we can, for the first time, provide a broodstock diet that is specialized for warm freshwater fish whose natural diet is largely plant based.” African aquaculture production is expanding in various ways and into various species. “We have for many years also supplied feed to a growing number of sea bass and sea bream farms based in northern African countries. We aim to add value to African aquaculture production. We listen to and react based on the needs of our customers as we want to act as a locally responsive, agile, and specialized aquaculture feed provider, building our efforts on the four fundamental pillars: Innovation, Performance, Sustainability, and Cooperation,” Ole Christensen concluded.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Danish feed firm BioMar Group is launching a "complete, high-performing range" for tilapia and African catfish, for African markets, it has announced. “We believe that aquaculture is one of the answers to this demand”, said Ole Christensen, vice president for BioMar’s EMEA division. “BioMar has ambitious targets and initiatives for shaping efficient and sustainable global aquaculture in collaboration with the entire aquaculture value chain.” In recent years, the growth of African catfish and tilapia farming has increased, particularly in the African markets, said the firm. For many years, BioMar has served the African markets from France by offering starter and grower diets for these species. As farms become increasingly intensive, the need for a diet targeted for broodstock has grown, it said. To meet this demand, BioMar France has now expanded its product range to cover all nutritional needs of these species at all stages of their life cycle, by introducing broodstock feed type EFICO Genio 838F, available for all tilapia and African catfish farmers in Africa and other markets served by BioMar’s EMEA division. As in Africa, tilapia is also a popular aquaculture species in Central America. Cross-utilizing knowledge and expertise in aquafeed across borders and continents is one of BioMar’s important strengths, it said, and it was central in developing BioMar’s feed range for tilapia. "Global R&D at BioMar has, in close collaboration with our unit in Costa Rica, carried out research on this species and developed high value feed types, which have been fine-tuned by working in close collaboration with an intensive tilapia farm." Now, for the first time, BioMar can provide a broodstock diet that is specialized for warm freshwater fish whose natural diet is largely plant based, noted Michel Autin, technical director of BioMar EMEA. The markets served by BioMar are not limited to tilapia and catfish, the firm added. “We have for many years also supplied feed to a growing number of seabass and sea bream farms based in Northern African countries."


Company says it's now the first net fish producer in Chile by using BioMar algae-based feed.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Danish feed group BioMar Group has reported a strong improvement in its revenue for Q1 2017, driven by an increase in salmon feed sales. All three geographical regions for salmon farming – Norway, Scotland and Chile – saw stronger sales, leading to a 24% lift in feed volumes sold. Sale especially in the 'salmon north' region soared, from DKK 680 million to DKK 1.04 billion. Overall volume sales rose from 166,000 metric tons to 205,000t. In the EMEA division, an increase in volumes sold from the factory in Denmark was offset by a slight drop in sales in Greece, according to BioMar's parent, Schouw & Co. This meant revenues for the quarter were up 30% year-on-year, to DKK 1.99bn ($293 million). Foreign exchange developments and prices of raw materials had only a moderate impact in the first quarter, allowing earnings before interest and tax (ebit) to more than double y-o-y, to DKK 51m. “We have across the divisions seen very good results from our efficiency improvement programs and our margin management,” said BioMar CEO Carlos Diaz. “But most important we have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end-consumer.” BioMar’s working capital fell from DKK 782m at March 31 2016 to DKK 514m in 2017. The large reduction was mainly due to an increase in supplier credit, achieved through a focused effort and greater use of supply chain financing, said Schouw. BioMar is consistently strengthening its market-driven approach, it said, and over the past several years, the company has succeeded in optimizing its product range, introducing various functional types of feed with a value-adding effect for customers. It is gradually winning back the volumes lost in Chile due to the severe algal blooms of early 2016. “The current attractive settlement prices coupled with generally good fish farming conditions provide a strong platform for growth in the salmon division, but as always market concerns are focused on regulation and the effects it could have on the potential for growth,” wrote Schouw. At the recent Seafood Expo Global in Brussels BioMar announced a future cooperation with Leroy Seafood Group and TerraVia would aim to ensure that all salmon farmed by Leroy will benefit from a sustainable, high level of omega 3-DHA in the feed, partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. Meanwhile, in the EMEA region, BioMar expects improvements to continue as the division strengthens its platform for growth by addressing new markets, and now having production facilities in Turkey. The new factory in Turkey, built in association with Turkish company Sagun Group, began commercial production in Q3 2016. After a slow start, production is now improving by the month, and the market is developing favorably, said Schouw. In China, BioMar is constructing a new fish feed factory in Wuxi near Shanghai in a joint venture with Chinese partner Tongwei Co. The factory, which is expected to open in the second half of 2017, will have a capacity of about 50,000t. The new factory joint venture will complement Tongwei’s current production by focusing on feed for high-value fish farming, utilizing “BioMar's special expertise in this area”, and “will strengthen BioMar’s position in the Chinese market”. In November 2016, the Chinese joint venture acquired fish feed producer Haiwei and its factory near Hong Kong. The transaction should help accelerate market penetration and generate higher sales in 2017. In March 2017 BioMar announced an almost DKK 300m investment in a new feed factory in Australia. The project is currently awaiting approval from the Australian authorities, and the new facility is expected to be ready by the end of 2019. With an annual capacity of about 110,000t of fish feed, the new factory will be a significant factor in BioMar's global expansion, it said. BioMar expects to increase volumes sold in 2017, mainly through added sales of salmon feed, it said. As a result, the company is guiding for a substantial revenue increase in 2017 over 2016, and given the prospects of moderate increases in raw materials prices, BioMar expects to generate revenue of not less than DKK 9.4bn in 2017. “We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts,” said Diaz. “We hope very soon other species could join this trend.” “We are confident that we are well prepared for the enhancing the efficiency and sustainability of the industry.” The 2016 ebit included positive effects of significant income flows relating to special circumstances that cannot be expected to occur again to the same extent in 2017 noted Shouw. But, on the other hand, “the anticipated volume increase and the generally good economic conditions for fish farming drive expectations of higher core earnings”. Against this background, BioMar continues to expect ebit in the DKK 510m-550m range for 2017.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

A 30 percent increase in salmon feed sales has helped deliver improved profits for the BioMar Group in Q1. All three country units in the Group’s salmon division – Norway, UK and Chile – performed better than in the first quarter of 2016, while product innovations were continuing apace too. Compared to Q1 2016 the group's overall volume of feeds sold increased from 166,000 to 205,000 tonnes, revenue increased from DKK 1532 million to 1996 million, while EBIT rose from DKK 22 million to 51.5 million. “We have across the divisions seen very good results from our efficiency improvement programs and our margin management. But most important we have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end-consumer”, explains Carlos Diaz, CEO of BioMar Group. At the Seafood Expo in Brussel last week BioMar Group announced that a future cooperation with Lerøy Seafood Group and TerraVia is going to ensure that all salmon farmed by Lerøy will benefit from a sustainable high level of Omega 3-DHA in the feed partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. “In BioMar Group we are continuously working to take the next steps in innovating aquaculture. To us novel oils and product with a measured sustainability profile is not a future vision. It is a reality! We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts. We hope very soon other species could join this trend. We live our purpose, and our guiding principles are innovation, sustainability, cooperation and performance, so the initiatives launched with our customers around the globe are in line with our strategy. We are confident that we are well prepared for the enhancing the efficiency and sustainability of the industry,” explains Diaz. Together with the launch of new products, BioMar Group has also launched the construction of a new feed factory in Australia, establishing a solid platform for close cooperation with the customers in the region. “We have during 2016 and the first part of 2017 been cooperating across the company improving and developing our new units in Turkey and China. We will continue this effort while investing resources in building up a new business unit in Australia. These expansions are in line with our strategy into new species and markets,” Diaz concludes.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fishupdate.com

DANISH feed company BioMar delivered a strong first quarter in both volume and profit, driven particularly by the salmon sector, the company announced today. In the salmon division the sales volume was almost 30 per cent higher than the same quarter last year, with all three country units in the division – Norway, UK and Chile – performing better. ‘We have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry, as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end consumer,’ said Carlos Diaz, BioMar CEO. At the Seafood Expo in Brussel last week BioMar announced that a future cooperation with Lerøy Seafood and TerraVia will ensure that all Lerøy salmon will benefit from a high level of omega-3 DHA in the feed partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. ‘In BioMar Group we are continuously working to take the next steps in innovating aquaculture. To us novel oils and product with a measured sustainability profile is not a future vision. It is a reality,’ said Diaz. ‘We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts. We hope very soon other species could join this trend.’ As well as launching new products, BioMar has begun the construction of a new feed factory in Australia, establishing a solid platform for close cooperation with the customers in the region. ‘We have during 2016 and the first part of 2017 been cooperating across the company, improving and developing our new units in Turkey and China,’ said Diaz. ‘We will continue this effort while investing resources in building up a new business unit in Australia. These expansions are in line with our strategy into new species and markets.’


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: phys.org

The group has published their findings in a study today in the Journal of Fish Diseases, including data showing that a simple measurement procedure could be used to detect Atlantic salmon infected with salmonid alpha virus, which causes pancreas disease. Pancreas disease – which is not an issue for product consumption and is harmless to humans – can cause significant losses in farmed Atlantic salmon due to morbidity, mortality and reduced production. The researchers found that salmon with pancreas disease had a major change in the proteins present in the blood, and further to that, that these protein changes could be detected using a simple procedure. The test, called a selective precipitation reaction (SPR), has been patented by the team and could potentially be developed into a rapid analysis system allowing the disease to be diagnosed much earlier than is currently possible. This would mean that the test could be applied at a fish farm, allowing for quick diagnosis of the disease and early treatment. Current testing requires sample submissions being sent to laboratories, a process that can take several days before results are available. Professor David Eckersall, Professor of Veterinary Biochemistry and leader of the research team at the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, said: "The serendipitous discovery of the SPR has allowed a potentially powerful diagnostic test to be developed that could have significant applications in the future. "This collaborative study, funded by a BBSRC CASE PhD studentship for our colleague Mark Braceland and supported by the aquaculture industry, has made a major contribution to the health and welfare of salmon. If this SPR test can be applied to other diseases and species of fish then the benefit will be even greater. This is an excellent example of the benefit of academia-industry links supported by the BBSRC CASE studentship scheme." Pancreas disease can, according to Aunsmo et al (2012), cause a loss of up to £1.43m for a single fish farm, so early detection is a vital component of the health care of salmon in aquaculture. The SPR test may also be useful in detecting other salmon diseases, or even diseases in other fish. Dr Mark Braceland, who now is in Prince Edward Island (Canada) at the Center for Aquaculture Technologies, said: "One of the persistent challenges faced by the industry is monitoring of stocks and defining what healthy stocks are. Marine aquaculture is a very unique and relatively new form of livestock culture, and as such, diagnostic and prognostic tools available for this industry are lacking. "The SPR has some great potential in complementing pathogen screening by allowing the industry to identify clinical stages of disease process, thus giving valuable information for health practitioners. I also see it as a valuable tool for establishing the efficacy of treatment and disease prevention technologies and hope it shall be utilized in this way in the future." Dr John Tinsley of BioMar Ltd said: "The collaboration with Professor Eckersall and the University of Glasgow has been a great success and we would like it to continue. The project not only developed a highly applicable diagnostic test for the industry, but produced numerous peer reviewed articles and advanced our knowledge of fish health and welfare." Dr Dave Cockerill (MRCVS) of Marine Harvest (Scotland) Ltd said: "SPR gives us an opportunity to put in place an early warning system for detection of significant pathology in fish. In particular it appears to be a non-specific indicator of this type of disease and this sets it apart from other diagnostic tools which test for specific known disease agents. SPR could become the early indicator that further specific investigation is required." More information: 'Selective Precipitation Reaction: A Novel Diagnostic Test for Tissue Pathology in Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar, infected with Salmonid Alpha-Virus,' Journal of Fish Diseases

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