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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fishupdate.com

DANISH feed company BioMar delivered a strong first quarter in both volume and profit, driven particularly by the salmon sector, the company announced today. In the salmon division the sales volume was almost 30 per cent higher than the same quarter last year, with all three country units in the division – Norway, UK and Chile – performing better. ‘We have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry, as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end consumer,’ said Carlos Diaz, BioMar CEO. At the Seafood Expo in Brussel last week BioMar announced that a future cooperation with Lerøy Seafood and TerraVia will ensure that all Lerøy salmon will benefit from a high level of omega-3 DHA in the feed partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. ‘In BioMar Group we are continuously working to take the next steps in innovating aquaculture. To us novel oils and product with a measured sustainability profile is not a future vision. It is a reality,’ said Diaz. ‘We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts. We hope very soon other species could join this trend.’ As well as launching new products, BioMar has begun the construction of a new feed factory in Australia, establishing a solid platform for close cooperation with the customers in the region. ‘We have during 2016 and the first part of 2017 been cooperating across the company, improving and developing our new units in Turkey and China,’ said Diaz. ‘We will continue this effort while investing resources in building up a new business unit in Australia. These expansions are in line with our strategy into new species and markets.’


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

A 30 percent increase in salmon feed sales has helped deliver improved profits for the BioMar Group in Q1. All three country units in the Group’s salmon division – Norway, UK and Chile – performed better than in the first quarter of 2016, while product innovations were continuing apace too. Compared to Q1 2016 the group's overall volume of feeds sold increased from 166,000 to 205,000 tonnes, revenue increased from DKK 1532 million to 1996 million, while EBIT rose from DKK 22 million to 51.5 million. “We have across the divisions seen very good results from our efficiency improvement programs and our margin management. But most important we have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end-consumer”, explains Carlos Diaz, CEO of BioMar Group. At the Seafood Expo in Brussel last week BioMar Group announced that a future cooperation with Lerøy Seafood Group and TerraVia is going to ensure that all salmon farmed by Lerøy will benefit from a sustainable high level of Omega 3-DHA in the feed partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. “In BioMar Group we are continuously working to take the next steps in innovating aquaculture. To us novel oils and product with a measured sustainability profile is not a future vision. It is a reality! We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts. We hope very soon other species could join this trend. We live our purpose, and our guiding principles are innovation, sustainability, cooperation and performance, so the initiatives launched with our customers around the globe are in line with our strategy. We are confident that we are well prepared for the enhancing the efficiency and sustainability of the industry,” explains Diaz. Together with the launch of new products, BioMar Group has also launched the construction of a new feed factory in Australia, establishing a solid platform for close cooperation with the customers in the region. “We have during 2016 and the first part of 2017 been cooperating across the company improving and developing our new units in Turkey and China. We will continue this effort while investing resources in building up a new business unit in Australia. These expansions are in line with our strategy into new species and markets,” Diaz concludes.


Company says it's now the first net fish producer in Chile by using BioMar algae-based feed.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Danish feed group BioMar Group has reported a strong improvement in its revenue for Q1 2017, driven by an increase in salmon feed sales. All three geographical regions for salmon farming – Norway, Scotland and Chile – saw stronger sales, leading to a 24% lift in feed volumes sold. Sale especially in the 'salmon north' region soared, from DKK 680 million to DKK 1.04 billion. Overall volume sales rose from 166,000 metric tons to 205,000t. In the EMEA division, an increase in volumes sold from the factory in Denmark was offset by a slight drop in sales in Greece, according to BioMar's parent, Schouw & Co. This meant revenues for the quarter were up 30% year-on-year, to DKK 1.99bn ($293 million). Foreign exchange developments and prices of raw materials had only a moderate impact in the first quarter, allowing earnings before interest and tax (ebit) to more than double y-o-y, to DKK 51m. “We have across the divisions seen very good results from our efficiency improvement programs and our margin management,” said BioMar CEO Carlos Diaz. “But most important we have been able to be at the market at the right time with new product concepts targeted at strengthening the sustainability of the industry as well as the quality and health dimension of the products delivered to the end-consumer.” BioMar’s working capital fell from DKK 782m at March 31 2016 to DKK 514m in 2017. The large reduction was mainly due to an increase in supplier credit, achieved through a focused effort and greater use of supply chain financing, said Schouw. BioMar is consistently strengthening its market-driven approach, it said, and over the past several years, the company has succeeded in optimizing its product range, introducing various functional types of feed with a value-adding effect for customers. It is gradually winning back the volumes lost in Chile due to the severe algal blooms of early 2016. “The current attractive settlement prices coupled with generally good fish farming conditions provide a strong platform for growth in the salmon division, but as always market concerns are focused on regulation and the effects it could have on the potential for growth,” wrote Schouw. At the recent Seafood Expo Global in Brussels BioMar announced a future cooperation with Leroy Seafood Group and TerraVia would aim to ensure that all salmon farmed by Leroy will benefit from a sustainable, high level of omega 3-DHA in the feed, partly deriving from the microalgae ingredient, AlgaPrime. Meanwhile, in the EMEA region, BioMar expects improvements to continue as the division strengthens its platform for growth by addressing new markets, and now having production facilities in Turkey. The new factory in Turkey, built in association with Turkish company Sagun Group, began commercial production in Q3 2016. After a slow start, production is now improving by the month, and the market is developing favorably, said Schouw. In China, BioMar is constructing a new fish feed factory in Wuxi near Shanghai in a joint venture with Chinese partner Tongwei Co. The factory, which is expected to open in the second half of 2017, will have a capacity of about 50,000t. The new factory joint venture will complement Tongwei’s current production by focusing on feed for high-value fish farming, utilizing “BioMar's special expertise in this area”, and “will strengthen BioMar’s position in the Chinese market”. In November 2016, the Chinese joint venture acquired fish feed producer Haiwei and its factory near Hong Kong. The transaction should help accelerate market penetration and generate higher sales in 2017. In March 2017 BioMar announced an almost DKK 300m investment in a new feed factory in Australia. The project is currently awaiting approval from the Australian authorities, and the new facility is expected to be ready by the end of 2019. With an annual capacity of about 110,000t of fish feed, the new factory will be a significant factor in BioMar's global expansion, it said. BioMar expects to increase volumes sold in 2017, mainly through added sales of salmon feed, it said. As a result, the company is guiding for a substantial revenue increase in 2017 over 2016, and given the prospects of moderate increases in raw materials prices, BioMar expects to generate revenue of not less than DKK 9.4bn in 2017. “We have right now a range of salmon customers delivering new product value propositions based upon our feed concepts,” said Diaz. “We hope very soon other species could join this trend.” “We are confident that we are well prepared for the enhancing the efficiency and sustainability of the industry.” The 2016 ebit included positive effects of significant income flows relating to special circumstances that cannot be expected to occur again to the same extent in 2017 noted Shouw. But, on the other hand, “the anticipated volume increase and the generally good economic conditions for fish farming drive expectations of higher core earnings”. Against this background, BioMar continues to expect ebit in the DKK 510m-550m range for 2017.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: phys.org

The group has published their findings in a study today in the Journal of Fish Diseases, including data showing that a simple measurement procedure could be used to detect Atlantic salmon infected with salmonid alpha virus, which causes pancreas disease. Pancreas disease – which is not an issue for product consumption and is harmless to humans – can cause significant losses in farmed Atlantic salmon due to morbidity, mortality and reduced production. The researchers found that salmon with pancreas disease had a major change in the proteins present in the blood, and further to that, that these protein changes could be detected using a simple procedure. The test, called a selective precipitation reaction (SPR), has been patented by the team and could potentially be developed into a rapid analysis system allowing the disease to be diagnosed much earlier than is currently possible. This would mean that the test could be applied at a fish farm, allowing for quick diagnosis of the disease and early treatment. Current testing requires sample submissions being sent to laboratories, a process that can take several days before results are available. Professor David Eckersall, Professor of Veterinary Biochemistry and leader of the research team at the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, said: "The serendipitous discovery of the SPR has allowed a potentially powerful diagnostic test to be developed that could have significant applications in the future. "This collaborative study, funded by a BBSRC CASE PhD studentship for our colleague Mark Braceland and supported by the aquaculture industry, has made a major contribution to the health and welfare of salmon. If this SPR test can be applied to other diseases and species of fish then the benefit will be even greater. This is an excellent example of the benefit of academia-industry links supported by the BBSRC CASE studentship scheme." Pancreas disease can, according to Aunsmo et al (2012), cause a loss of up to £1.43m for a single fish farm, so early detection is a vital component of the health care of salmon in aquaculture. The SPR test may also be useful in detecting other salmon diseases, or even diseases in other fish. Dr Mark Braceland, who now is in Prince Edward Island (Canada) at the Center for Aquaculture Technologies, said: "One of the persistent challenges faced by the industry is monitoring of stocks and defining what healthy stocks are. Marine aquaculture is a very unique and relatively new form of livestock culture, and as such, diagnostic and prognostic tools available for this industry are lacking. "The SPR has some great potential in complementing pathogen screening by allowing the industry to identify clinical stages of disease process, thus giving valuable information for health practitioners. I also see it as a valuable tool for establishing the efficacy of treatment and disease prevention technologies and hope it shall be utilized in this way in the future." Dr John Tinsley of BioMar Ltd said: "The collaboration with Professor Eckersall and the University of Glasgow has been a great success and we would like it to continue. The project not only developed a highly applicable diagnostic test for the industry, but produced numerous peer reviewed articles and advanced our knowledge of fish health and welfare." Dr Dave Cockerill (MRCVS) of Marine Harvest (Scotland) Ltd said: "SPR gives us an opportunity to put in place an early warning system for detection of significant pathology in fish. In particular it appears to be a non-specific indicator of this type of disease and this sets it apart from other diagnostic tools which test for specific known disease agents. SPR could become the early indicator that further specific investigation is required." More information: 'Selective Precipitation Reaction: A Novel Diagnostic Test for Tissue Pathology in Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar, infected with Salmonid Alpha-Virus,' Journal of Fish Diseases


Tacchi L.,University of Aberdeen | Secombes C.J.,University of Aberdeen | Bickerdike R.,BioMar Ltd | Adler M.A.,BioMar Ltd | And 3 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2012

Background: Aquaculture of piscivorous fish is in continual expansion resulting in a global requirement to reduce the dependence on wild caught fish for generation of fishmeal and fish oil. Plant proteins represent a suitable protein alternative to fish meal and are increasingly being used in fish feed. In this study, we examined the transcriptional response of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to a high marine protein (MP) or low fishmeal, higher plant protein replacement diet (PP), formulated to the same nutritional specification within previously determined acceptable maximum levels of individual plant feed materials.Results: After 77 days of feeding the fish in both groups doubled in weight, however neither growth performance, feed efficiency, condition factor nor organ indices were significantly different. Assessment of histopathological changes in the heart, intestine or liver did not reveal any negative effects of the PP diet. Transcriptomic analysis was performed in mid intestine, liver and skeletal muscle, using an Atlantic salmon oligonucleotide microarray (Salar_2, Agilent 4x44K). The dietary comparison revealed large alteration in gene expression in all the tissues studied between fish on the two diets. Gene ontology analysis showed, in the mid intestine of fish fed PP, higher expression of genes involved in enteritis, protein and energy metabolism, mitochondrial activity/kinases and transport, and a lower expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis compared to fish fed MP. The liver of fish fed PP showed a lower expression of immune response genes but a higher expression of cell proliferation and apoptosis processes that may lead to cell reorganization in this tissue. The skeletal muscle of fish fed PP vs MP was characterized by a suppression of processes including immune response, energy and protein metabolism, cell proliferation and apoptosis which may reflect a more energy efficient tissue.Conclusions: The PP diet resulted in significant effects on transcription in all the 3 tissues studied. Despite of these alterations, we demonstrated that high level of plant derived proteins in a salmon diet allowed fish to grow with equal efficiency as those on a high marine protein diet, and with no difference in biometric quality parameters. © 2012 Tacchi et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Tacchi L.,University of Aberdeen | Bickerdike R.,BioMar Ltd | Douglas A.,University of Aberdeen | Secombes C.J.,University of Aberdeen | Martin S.A.M.,University of Aberdeen
Fish and Shellfish Immunology | Year: 2011

Functional feeds are diets that have positive effects on both health and growth promoting performance of the animals ingesting them, by supplying additional compounds above and beyond the basic nutritional requirements for animal growth alone. The most common additives used in aquaculture diets are probiotics, prebiotics, immunostimulants, vitamins and nucleotides. Inclusion of these components to fish diets can increase feed conversion efficiency and growth, as well as having positive effects on the fish immune system. This review discusses the results from previous studies on fish nutrition and includes a novel genomic approach, using microarray analysis, to elucidate nutritional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed a newly developed functional feed health premix diet. The transcriptome analysis demonstrated that compared to the standard diet feeding with the functional feed had significant effects on biological processes in the liver. This resulted in a reduction of the expression of genes related to protein turnover, reduced circulating plasma proteins and a down regulation of genes involved in the immune response. These results suggest that the functional feed may infer a decrease in whole body metabolic demands, suppressing both protein turnover and whole body oxygen demand, as well as down regulating several genes involved in the innate immune system. Together these changes appear to result in less energy wastage in fish and an enhanced growth and performance. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Tacchi L.,University of Aberdeen | Bickerdike R.,BioMar Ltd | Secombes C.J.,University of Aberdeen | Martin S.A.M.,University of Aberdeen
Marine Biotechnology | Year: 2012

The selection of proteins destined for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is coordinated by E3 ubiquitin ligases (E3Ub). One group of E3Ubs is described as muscle-specific RING finger (MuRF) molecules. In mammals, these proteins are believed to be central to targetting of muscle proteins for degradation during physiological perturbations such as starvation and inflammatory responses. In fish, the diversity of MuRF sequences is unexplored as is the expression of their mRNAs. In this study, three MuRF1 cDNAs, denoted as MuRF1a, MuRF1b, and MuRF1c, and a single MuRF2 were identified and characterized in Atlantic salmon. The MuRF1 sequences are highly conserved and encode predicted proteins of 349, 350, and 353 amino acids, whereas MuRF2 encodes a longer protein of 462 amino acids. The evolutionary relationship of these sequences with other fish and mammalian molecules shows that MuRF1a and 1b may have arisen from a recent salmonid duplication. The mRNA of MuRFs was expressed in multiple tissues, with highest abundance in white muscle tissue followed by the heart. The expression of MuRFs was modulated after both starvation and immune challenge. Starvation increased expression of all MuRF mRNAs in white muscle, with the greatest increase found in MuRF1a. A proinflammatory stimulation increased expression of MuRF mRNA in muscle and other tissues indicating a role of these proteins in protein degradation during inflammation. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Ekmann K.S.,Technical University of Denmark | Dalsgaard J.,Technical University of Denmark | Holm J.,BioMar A S | Campbell P.J.,BioMar Ltd | Skov P.V.,Technical University of Denmark
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2013

The effects of replacing a digestible energy source from fat (fish oil) with carbohydrate (wheat starch) on performance, glycogenesis and de novo lipogenesis was examined in triplicate groups of juvenile gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), fed four extruded experimental diets. In order to trace the metabolic fate of dietary starch, 0·7 % wheat starch was replaced with isotope-labelled starch (>98 % 13C). Fish were fed the experimental diets for three consecutive 10 d periods, and isotope ratio MS was applied to quantify 13C enrichment of liver and whole-body glycogen and lipid pools over the three feeding periods. Glycogenesis originating from dietary starch accounted for up to 68·8 and 38·8 % of the liver and whole-body glycogen pools, respectively, while up to 16·7 % of the liver lipid could be attributed to dietary starch. Between 5 and 8 % of dietary starch carbon was recovered in whole-body lipid, and estimated deposition rates of de novo synthesised lipid originating from starch ranged from 18·7 to 123·7 mg/kg biomass per d. Dietary treatments did not significantly affect growth, feed performance or body composition of the fish, while the hepatosomatic index and glycogen content of whole fish and livers correlated directly with dietary starch inclusion level. The study suggests that gilthead sea bream efficiently synthesises glycogen from both dietary starch and endogenous sources. In contrast, lipogenesis from carbon derived from starch seems to play a minor role in overall lipid synthesis and deposition under the specified experimental conditions. © 2012 The Authors.


Penn M.H.,Aquaculture Protein Center a CoE | Bendiksen E.A.,BioMar AS | Campbell P.,BioMar Ltd | Krogdahl A.S.,Aquaculture Protein Center a CoE
Aquaculture | Year: 2011

The current study investigated the effects of pea protein concentrate, soy protein concentrate and corn gluten, either singly at high inclusion, or in combination, each at lower inclusion, in diets for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Growth performance, nutrient digestibility, intestinal brush border enzyme activity, and intestinal histology were studied in an 8-week feeding trial. Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (2.36kg initial weight) were kept in sea water at winter temperature. Five diets were tested, including a control diet based on fish meal (FM diet; 250gkg-1 fishmeal) and four low fishmeal (100gkg-1) diets: a diet containing 350gkg-1 pea protein concentrate (PPC diet), a diet containing 300gkg-1 soy protein concentrate (SPC diet), a diet containing 300gkg-1 corn gluten (CG diet) and a combination diet containing 130gkg-1 pea protein concentrate, 105gkg-1 soy protein concentrate and 105gkg-1 corn gluten (CMB diet). Fish fed CG and PPC diets showed lower SGR than fish fed the FM diet and there was a trend (P<0.09) towards a higher feed conversion (FCR) in the fish receiving the CG and PPC diets. Apparent fat digestibility was lower in fish fed SPC, PPC and CMB diets compared to FM. No difference in apparent crude protein digestibility was observed. Feeding the PPC diet resulted in reduced relative weight and inflammation in the distal intestine similar to those described for soy enteritis. Additionally, fish fed the PPC diet had reduced brush border enzyme activities in the distal intestine and increased trypsin activity in the digesta from the distal intestine region. In conclusion, pea protein concentrate at high inclusion was shown to induce an enteropathy in the distal intestine of Atlantic salmon and caution should be used when including it in formulated feeds for Atlantic salmon. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

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